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By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
Baseball fans of the late 20th century can find souvenirs of xTC their favorite team in variety and abundance, almost anywhere in the country.A hundred years ago, it was very different.According to Joe Bosley, an expert on old baseball memorabilia, "Much of the [19th century] stuff you see is from tobacco products." The first baseball cards were produced by Old Judge in the late 1880s as "a gimmick to get you to buy tobacco."There are team and individual photographs -- taken in studios. Items such as pins were usually only produced in championship years.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 9, 1994
The workbench was piled with things that needed fixing, but I had a more pressing duty. I had to go out in the alley and teach the kids the fine points of the game some call base runners.It is a simple game. Two players stand at bases about 60 feet apart and toss a ball back and forth. A third player, the runner, waits for the opportune moment to race from one base to the other without being tagged out by the player catching the ball. Our crew used a tennis ball instead of a baseball because the ball has been known to land on a runner, or the family car, instead of a baseball glove.
NEWS
By Jon Nargolis | September 7, 1993
WERE it an isolated incident, it would be foolish to make much of the latest outrage visited on William Joseph Buckner.But it was only one outrage among many, against Buckner and others. Something unhealthy is going on here.A few weeks ago, after almost seven years -- seven years! -- of being taunted by strangers, Buckner finally snapped and laid hands on someone, though without hurting him. Later he said that because of the recurring harassment he might have to move out of New England.And just what was it that Buckner did to deserve this regular mistreatment by people who never met him?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 8, 1993
Let's take as our proposition the following: You've bitten into this All-Star Game stuff totally, you can't wait for the game, and, in the meantime, you want more baseball, baseball, baseball, baseball. So off you go to the local vid parlor. What to rent?Try one of these."The Natural," Baltimorean Barry Levinson's upbeat rendering of Bernard Malamud's luminous and tragic first novel that drew its inspiration from Sir Thomas Malory's "Le Morte d'Arthur" and "Casey at the Bat." But . . . do you think Hollywood is going to let mighty Redford strike out?
NEWS
April 3, 1993
Along with the cry "Play ball!" comes the shout "Park here!" As Oriole Park at Camden Yards prepares to welcome baseball fans back for its second season, transit and traffic officials again gird for fans on their way to the ballpark. A year ago they faced the prospect with hope tinged by trepidation. With a season's experience behind them, they rely less on hope but still admit to a bit of trepidation.The first season at Camden Yards was a stupendous success from almost every viewpoint -- other than a pennant.
NEWS
March 5, 1993
CHOMPING at the bit for Opening Day to arrive? Here's an offbeat tidbit from writer Alice Rindler Shapin in Endless Vacation magazine:"Spring! And my 9-year-old son, Scott, bursts forth with his annual rendition of 'Take Me Out to the Ball Game,' followed by a chorus of 'Please, Please, Pleeease!'"Lucky for him, Washington, D.C. . . . [is] smack in the middle of baseball territory. Of course, I'm not talking about the majors -- Washington hasn't had its own team since the Senators left at the end of the 1971 season.
NEWS
By Steve McKerrow | July 13, 1992
PLAY BALL!Actually, the All-Star Game is not until tomorrow night. But tonight's television can get you in the mood.And the pick of the lineup may be "When It Was a Game II," at 10 o'clock on premium cable's HBO, an equally sweet sequel to last year's documentary chronicling the early years of professional baseball through grainy old film and still photos.This one, as viewers are told up front, includes footage from 8mm and 16mm home movies, most of it in color and shot by ballplayers and fans from the 1930s through the '50s.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writers | May 8, 1992
A neighborhood Wiffle ball game turned ugly yesterday after a group of teens attacked another group of young people in the Nottingham section of Ferndale.Police said twin brothers Jeff and Wilmer Forloines, both 21, of Pampano Drive, were assaulted by a group of six or more youths at about 4:40 p.m. after an argument about who could play in the game.Sgt. James R. Moore said county police have identified six teens in connection with the attack and expect to make arrests within the next few days.
NEWS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,Staff writer | January 12, 1992
Every high school basketball coach dreams of going to school one dayand learning that a 6-foot, 10-inch all-star-quality player has transferred in.It's a rare situation. But it happened at Hammond Highin 1982 when Terry and Perry Dozier, nicknamed the Twin Towers, transferred there and brought the Bears their only state title (1983) andonly two county titles in 1982 and 1983.This season brings no 6-10 transfers, but there are an unprecedented 11 transfers in the county, seven of them good enough to start.
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