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By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
He recently won a precedent-setting war-crimes conviction. But as former Carroll County State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman begins his third year as a United Nations prosecutor in Kosovo, he finds as much meaning - and a reason to hope for better times in the dangerous Balkans - in a case involving a single homicide. A Serb woman had been beaten to death at the door of her bustling apartment building, but his investigation stalled when no one would acknowledge having seen anything. Then about a year later, an ethnic Albanian woman named the killer: an Albanian man who hated Serbs and wanted the victim's apartment.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2003
He recently won a precedent-setting war-crimes conviction. But as former Carroll County State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman begins his third year as a United Nations prosecutor in Kosovo, he finds as much meaning - and a reason to hope for better times in the dangerous Balkans - in a case involving a single homicide. A Serb woman had been beaten to death at the door of her bustling apartment building, but his investigation stalled when no one would acknowledge having seen anything. Then about a year later, an ethnic Albanian woman named the killer: an Albanian man who hated Serbs and wanted the victim's apartment.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
BELGRADE, Serbia-Montenegro - A day after Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic was gunned down, the government announced yesterday that it had arrested or detained 58 people in connection with the assassination, including two men believed to have been involved in some of the worst atrocities of the Balkan civil wars. Acting Prime Minister Nebojsa Covic said a successor to Djindjic would be nominated Sunday. After a day of intensive manhunts under a government-declared state of emergency, police said 56 people had been detained on suspicion of conspiring in Wednesday's sharpshooter ambush on Djindjic, who was shot as he walked into his office building.
NEWS
January 1, 2003
THERE'S A certain kind of Democrat who wants to have nothing whatsoever to do with Bill Clinton. Al Gore and a few more recent candidates come to mind - but just look where it got them. It only goes to show that ingratitude is its own reward, or something like that. Here's a different take on the former president: In the heart of Pristina, the capital of Kosovo, there is a 40-foot-tall portrait of Bill Clinton, and it overlooks Bill Clinton Boulevard. In Kosovo, they haven't forgotten the man who drove out the Serbs, and they're not ashamed to say so. Theirs is a country - let's face it - where the heroically named avenues were once dominated by huge portraits of steely-eyed Yugoslav Communists or an idealized and granite-jawed Vladimir Lenin, so they know something about gigantic art in the public service, but now they've got Bill, as twinkly-eyed and as round-jawed and, yes, as unideal as they come.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 2002
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Former Bosnian Serb President Biljana Plavsic, the first Balkan political leader to plead guilty to war crimes charges, faced justice, history and her country's collective denial in yesterday's opening of her extraordinary three-day sentencing hearing. An academic and politician who incited ethnic hatred, consorted with warlords and earned the nickname the Iron Lady of the Balkans, Plavsic was a key public figure during the violent unraveling of Yugoslavia in the 1990s.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley expressed strong opposition yesterday to a City Council reform proposal, claiming single-member districts will lead to less minority representation and a fragmentation of city politics. "Single-member districts would be Balkanizing and polarizing ... and make the council much more vulnerable to narrow special interests," said O'Malley, who stood beside Council President Sheila Dixon and other council members at a news conference in City Hall. A representative of a citizens group pushing to shrink the council from 19 to 15 members accused the mayor of playing on baseless racial fears to save the jobs of his council allies.
NEWS
By Ben Piven and Ben Piven,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2002
Sitting among an alert crowd of fellow young adults from the Balkans, Victoria Daskalova gazes critically at Ana Vojinic-Tunic during a debate over the value of requiring children to wear school uniforms. "We believe in freedom of expression and don't think school uniforms are necessary," Vojinic-Tunic argues. After analyzing both sides, Daskalova soon concludes that Vojinic-Tunic's speech does not match a previous one by Katya Georgieva of the team arguing in favor of uniforms. A group of four attentive Macedonians disagrees, saying that Vojinic-Tunic's side was far more persuasive.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
Martti Ahtisaari has inspected weapons dumps in Ireland and brokered peace in Kosovo. But now the former president of Finland faces what in some ways will be his most enduring challenge yet: how to help the young people of the Balkans build a future. As chairman of the Global Action Council of the International Youth Foundation, Ahtisaari is trying to solve the problems of youth around the world. But the anger, hatred and deep-seated ethnic conflict in the Balkans have left young people - many of whom have lived through the violence - especially vulnerable, lacking education, homes and hope.
NEWS
February 26, 2002
FOR THE SAKE of argument, let's forget for a moment about achieving justice. From a strictly practical point of view, will the war-crimes trial of Slobodan Milosevic make things worse in the Balkans? Plenty of Serbs think so. And, with the trial barely two weeks old, so do a growing number of those who worry that reconciliation may never gain a foothold in the former Yugoslavia. Their reasoning goes like this: Mr. Milosevic is doing a surprisingly effective job of defending himself, skillfully playing into Serbs' resentments and fears that the whole world is against them.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
LOOK AT THE MAP BELOW. And after you uncross your eyes, get used to those winding, wriggling shapes. If Gov. Parris N. Glendening has his way, this is how Marylanders will be represented in the next 10 Congresses. Any number of its appalling features should push this proposal back to square one. Take the 3rd District, for example. It snakes through and around Baltimore, Baltimore County and Anne Arundel County neighborhoods that have little in common outside of their strategic and political value.
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