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By Wiliam Pfaff | November 8, 1990
Paris. THE BALKAN question has been with us since the early 19th century. It is not entirely accurate to describe it as a problem of nationalism, as if nationalism were peculiar to the Balkans and there were not other peoples with a destructive conviction of their own natural superiority.The problem with the Balkans is that its nations have not yet found the fixed national boundaries which would permit nationalist passion to subside. Thus Balkan national feeling, frustrated, remains packed with resentment.
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NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2007
Chronicle in Stone Ismail Kadare Arcade Publishing / 320 pages / $25 "War," the old woman says as she points to red places on the rooster's breastbone. "War and blood." The words haunt the boy who narrates Ismail Kadare's autobiographical novel, Chronicle in Stone. They also foreshadow the plot as well as establishing the tone and background of this gem-like growing-up tale, which was first published in Albania in 1971 and first translated into English in 1987. This new English translation by David Bellos is based on Kadare's revisions to the original, which were written after he received the first Man Booker International Prize in 2005 for the body of his work.
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NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 11, 1995
MOSCOW -- Less than a week after Croatia's rout of a Serbian army, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin called yesterday for a Moscow peace summit on the Balkans but also threatened to ignore United Nations trade sanctions by coming to the aid of Serb-dominated Yugoslavia.Foreign affairs specialists said Mr. Yeltsin's combination of mediation and threats were a seat-of-the-pants effort to bolster his own image at home and Russia's image abroad and also to reassert Moscow's traditional sympathies with the Serbs.
NEWS
July 13, 2007
Time's up. Serbian politicians will never agree to an independent Kosovo. So Kosovo will just have to become independent without their consent. For eight years now, ever since the NATO air war drove Serbian forces out, Kosovo has been in limbo. The Kosovar Albanians want sovereignty, and the U.S. and the European Union - albeit with serious qualms - have decided there is no alternative. But they've been trying to jolly the Serbs along, to entice them to recognize that Kosovo is lost to them.
NEWS
By HENRY TREWHITT | May 9, 1993
Too late for many former Yugoslavs, too early for millions in many nations, show time is just ahead for the major powers. They will have sorted out whether to arm Bosnian Muslims, expanding the bloodletting, whether to try neutralizing Serbian butchers with air power, whether and with what orders to send ground troops.It is possible to write a script in which the democracies and even Russia, led by America, march decisively into Bosnia, stare down the murderers and take a bow. What a wonderful outcome!
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA and RICHARD O'MARA,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1996
"Balkan Odyssey," by David Owen. Harcourt Brace & Company. 389 pages. $25The London Conference of August 1992 was convened to end the fighting in the former Yugoslavia. There, David Owen and Cyrus Vance, Jimmy Carter's secretary of state, were commissioned by the European Community to negotiate a settlement to the conflicts. They failed.This book is Mr. Owen's account of their efforts. It is excessively detailed, mildly self-serving and sadly lacking in that delicious scathing quality common to the memoirs of English peers.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1996
The Discovery Channel's "Yugoslavia: Death of a Nation," a five-part, five-hour examination of the insane, bloody mess that's been tearing the Balkans apart for four years, was easily one the best things on television last year. A new chapter in the series airs tonight, with updates on the conflict and the hopes for a lasting peace."The City" (12: 30 p.m.-1 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Actor, dancer, singer, choreographer, director and really-tall-guy Tommy Tune does a guest turn as -- now here's a stretch!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | October 17, 1999
"The Fracture Zone," by Simon Winchester. HarperCollins. 257 pages. $23.There is precious little to like in this book, and that's a shame. Author Simon Winchester certainly is capable of better work, based on his fine previous effort, "The Professor and the Madman." But "The Fracture Zone: A Return to the Balkans" exhibits all the symptoms of a hasty idea hustled into print by a publisher determined to make a quick buck from a hot property.Shallow, incomplete and annoyingly melodramatic, Winchester purports to explain the centuries-old forces and tensions that led to this year's war in Kosovo from insights he gained during two trips to the region, one during the war and one in 1977.
NEWS
By Gregory Michaelidis | November 26, 2000
WASHINGTON -- There is an historical theory that goes something like this: Centuries never really begin and end when the calendar says they do. Rather, major shaping events come along somewhere near the start and finish to serve as psychological markers for this "alternate century." A version of this theory argues that the 20th century really began in the Balkans in 1914 with the outbreak of World War I. That said, the wave of democracy that recently swept Slobodan Milosevic from power in Yugoslavia might someday be viewed as the psychological end to the 20th century.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 16, 1993
FRANKFURT, Germany -- Quietly and with great misgivings, the U.S. military in Europe is training for the kinds of operations it could be called upon to perform in the Balkans.Air Force fighter-bomber pilots at Ramstein Air Base have been practicing bombing and missile-firing runs against field guns at the Army's training range at Grafenwoehr in northern Bavaria, in case President Clinton orders them into action against Serbian nationalist military targets in Bosnia-Herzegovina.At the same range, two Army battalions have already gone through a training course for peacekeeping missions in a mythical Balkan-like country called "Danubia."
NEWS
January 25, 2007
Tomorrow the Balkans come back into play. The immediate issue is the future of Kosovo, which has spent more than seven years now as an ill-defined international protectorate - to the dismay of Kosovar Albanians, who want independence, and of Serbs, who long to have the province back under their control. A larger question has to do with the continuing aftershocks from the collapse of European communism. The U.N. special envoy for Kosovo is to present his long-awaited plan for the province's future to the six-nation Contact Group tomorrow in Vienna.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | September 14, 2006
Moroccan, electronica, Klezmer, Egyptian, Romanian. Balkan Beat Box has a long, abstract list of cultural and musical influences. You can hear it on the record or see it in the wild live show. The group's next concert is tonight at Fletcher's. On the band's album, Klezmer horns pump and blare along with guitars, pounding drums, electronic samples and Middle Eastern melodies. It's more than a modern take on traditional musical styles, said band co-founder Tamir Muskat. "I really think we're twisting the whole thing up right now," he said.
NEWS
By JEFFREY FLEISHMAN and JEFFREY FLEISHMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 12, 2006
Slobodan Milosevic, the former Yugoslav leader whose sinister nationalism propelled his country into four wars and unleashed a decade of "ethnic cleansing" that cost more than 250,000 lives, was found dead in his prison cell yesterday in The Hague, where he was on trial for crimes against humanity. Guards found Milosevic, 64, dead in his bed at the United Nations detention center, the U.N. war crimes tribunal announced. He apparently died of natural causes. An autopsy was ordered. Milosevic had a history of poor health, including high blood pressure and a chronic heart condition.
NEWS
By MARK MAZZETTI and MARK MAZZETTI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- U.S. military Web sites that pay journalists to write articles and commentary supporting military activities in Europe and Africa do not violate U.S. law or Pentagon policies, a review by the Pentagon's chief investigator has concluded. But a senior Defense Department official said this week that the Web sites could still be shut down to avoid the appearance of impropriety. The Pentagon inspector general's inquiry concludes that two Web sites targeting audiences in the Balkans and in the Maghreb region of northern Africa are consistent with U.S. laws prohibiting covert propaganda, are properly identified as U.S. government products, and are maintained in close coordination with U.S. embassies abroad, according to a previously undisclosed summary of the report's findings.
NEWS
November 25, 2005
The last American war of the 20th century - the war over Kosovo - has gone unsettled. Kosovo has festered for more than six years since the actual NATO bombing campaign halted. Overseen by foreign powers, the little province is home to a host of intractable problems, rife with Muslim-Christian tensions, unable to move forward, and an obstacle to progress throughout the Balkans. Even Bosnia is moving ahead, with a new agreement on power-sharing just announced in Washington, but Kosovo is a harder case.
NEWS
By TED GALEN CARPENTER | November 6, 2005
R. Nicholas Burns, undersecretary of state for political affairs, recently put Balkan issues back on the front burner when he pressured Bosnia's Serb, Muslim and Croat leaders to replace the country's three-person, multiethnic presidency with a single president. That step is needed, he said, to create a stronger, more cohesive state. He added that there should be a firm commitment to such reforms by the time Balkan leaders visit Washington this month to mark the 10th anniversary of the Dayton accords that ended the Bosnian civil war. Dayton, Mr. Burns intoned, has served its purpose and now needs to "evolve."
NEWS
By R. C. Longworth and R. C. Longworth,Chicago Tribune | May 15, 1993
SKOPJE, Macedonia -- The prospect of sending U.S. forces to Macedonia -- as President Clinton has suggested -- raises much less anxiety here than in other places in the Balkans.But the view from here is that it may be only a matter of time before the fires of the Balkan civil war set Macedonia ablaze."And when that happens, it would mean without doubt a new Balkan war," said Risto Nikovski, Macedonia's under secretary for foreign affairs. "Bosnia is basically a civil war. Here, five or six countries would be involved.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2004
BUKAVU, Congo - One evening four months ago, a soft-spoken 18-year-old named Aziza was selling bananas in the market here when some U.N. peacekeepers summoned her to their car. Aziza went over thinking they wanted to buy fruit, but was persuaded to engage in a different kind of transaction. "They offered me love," she said, in the colloquial French spoken in this former Belgian colony. And money - just $5, but more than she would make in a month at the market. "It was done in the car, in the dark," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | September 21, 2003
I have made a habit of reviewing books written by colleagues at The Sun. Inevitably, there's the appearance of possible conflict in such cases, which is hereby acknowledged. Take that or leave it, I find it particularly gratifying when the volumes please me. And such it is with The Small Boat of Great Sorrows (Knopf, 320 pages, $24), Dan Fesperman's second novel. It is a literary thriller with historical perspective of Balkan society. It's a respectful but deeply troubled and troubling recognition of the apparently perpetual tribal hatreds among Catholic Croats, Eastern Orthodox Serbs, Muslims and any numbers of offshoots, subdivisions and outsiders.
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