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NEWS
May 24, 1993
The Sykesville Recycling Committee has recommended the town use a $13,000 state grant to purchase a high-density paper and cardboard baler.The Town Council opened two bids for the machine at its May 10 meeting. Before awarding the bid, members said they wanted to compare all the equipment specifications. They will reconsider the bids at the 7 p.m. meeting today.Max-Pak of Rainsville, Ala., offered the lower bid, $9,220 including shipping and installation. LTR Corp. of Columbia bid $14,000.
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NEWS
February 18, 1994
Sykesville residents can soon add corrugated cardboard to the recyclable materials collected at curbside once a week."It should be official after the next council meeting" on Feb. 28, said Eugene E. Johnson Jr., director of the town Public Works Department."
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
With a baler at their disposal, Sykesville officials hope to solve cardboard collection problems, save money on landfill fees and turn a profit.The Town Council decided at Monday's meeting to give the machine a trial, approving a six-month lease."
NEWS
May 26, 1993
Sykesville Town Council votes to purchase balerThe Sykesville Town Council voted to use the remaining $14,000 of a $15,000 state grant to purchase a baler for its Recycling Center.Approximately $1,000 had already been used for projects such as a campaign to boost town participation in recycling and the lease of a recycling truck.The Epco Series 2000 baler, sold and serviced at LTR Corp. in Eldersburg, can be delivered in about 30 days, said Town Manager James L. Schumacher Monday.The town had opened two bids for the machine at the May 10 meeting.
NEWS
February 11, 1993
State awards recycling grant to SykesvilleThe Maryland Department of Natural Resources has awarded a $13,073 recycling grant to the town of Sykesville."
NEWS
February 18, 1994
Sykesville residents can soon add corrugated cardboard to the recyclable materials collected at curbside once a week."It should be official after the next council meeting" on Feb. 28, said Eugene E. Johnson Jr., director of the town Public Works Department."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | April 10, 1991
"Too Loud a Solitude," by Bohumil Hrabal, translated by By Michael Henry Heim. 98 pages, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York, N.Y., $16.95.THE SPLENDID thing about fine writers is that they are inherently subversive. You suppress their books and set them to work on the railroad and they write books about closely watched trains.Make them bale paper in a basement, they write books about baling paper in a basement. Put them in jail and they become the president of your country.Bohumil Hrabal -- a great name for a writer of black humor -- had the bad luck to be born in 1914.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Contributing writer | November 18, 1990
In a back room at Klein's Super Thrift Market in Bel Air, a cardboard crusher moans, groans, whines and wheezes as it devours an endless buffet of boxes.The greasy, 30-year-old machine, which quickly flattens up to 1 ton of boxes before they are shipped to a local recycler, hardly qualifies as advanced technology.Yet county administrators are looking to such processes used by industry to play an important role in the modern-day recycling movement.Boosting recycling efforts by Harford business and industry is a critical -- if overshadowed -- aspect of the county's plan to reduce by 15 percent the garbage entering the county landfill, said Robert Donald, director of the Harford Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | February 22, 1993
Faced with a decline in the percentage of trash being recycled, Sykesville officials are considering fining nonparticipants in their curbside recycling program.The town may have to institute fines "if there is no other way to convince people to get in the habit," said Council President Kenneth W. Clark.At the council's Feb. 8 meeting, he recommended a warning system before fining residents and businesses.Town Manager James L. Schumacher said he will report to the council on other towns in the Maryland Municipal League that have mandatory fines.
NEWS
May 24, 1993
The Sykesville Recycling Committee has recommended the town use a $13,000 state grant to purchase a high-density paper and cardboard baler.The Town Council opened two bids for the machine at its May 10 meeting. Before awarding the bid, members said they wanted to compare all the equipment specifications. They will reconsider the bids at the 7 p.m. meeting today.Max-Pak of Rainsville, Ala., offered the lower bid, $9,220 including shipping and installation. LTR Corp. of Columbia bid $14,000.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
With a baler at their disposal, Sykesville officials hope to solve cardboard collection problems, save money on landfill fees and turn a profit.The Town Council decided at Monday's meeting to give the machine a trial, approving a six-month lease."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | April 10, 1991
"Too Loud a Solitude," by Bohumil Hrabal, translated by By Michael Henry Heim. 98 pages, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York, N.Y., $16.95.THE SPLENDID thing about fine writers is that they are inherently subversive. You suppress their books and set them to work on the railroad and they write books about closely watched trains.Make them bale paper in a basement, they write books about baling paper in a basement. Put them in jail and they become the president of your country.Bohumil Hrabal -- a great name for a writer of black humor -- had the bad luck to be born in 1914.
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