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Bald Eagles

TRAVEL
February 7, 1999
Where eagles flyTwo locations -- one nearby and the other farther afield -- provide opportunities to see one of America's most symbolic birds, the bald eagle, in its winter habitat.Regionally, more than 100 of these birds migrate to Pennsylvania and New York during the winter to fish in the ice-free waters of the upper Delaware River. The Eagle Institute, a nonprofit organization promoting habitat conservation, offers guided field trips, children's festivals, school programs and slide presentations focused on the bald eagles.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie | May 14, 1991
FMC Corp. agreed yesterday to stop selling a crop pesticide in Maryland and nine other coastal states that has been blamed for the deaths of more than a dozen bald eagles in the Chesapeake Bay region.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency negotiated a total ban on sales, effective Sept. 1, in Maryland and other areas where there are breeding grounds and crucial habitat for bald eagles and migratory birds.The company negotiated a settlement with the EPA that calls for a three-year phasing out of the use of carbofuran granules nationwide.
NEWS
May 3, 2014
One can always hear a great "spin" in a story, particularly when the authors are activists for a cause. I refer to the commentary concerning wind turbines in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation," April 21). Authors Tom Vinson and Bruce Burcat are paid individuals whose job is to promote wind and renewable energy regardless of some factual information. First, the $200 million dollar project is a number that has somehow appeared with little actual data behind it. Sounds good though.
EXPLORE
April 26, 2013
I think people should try to conserve water and not pollute it. Water is the primary resource people and animals need to live. Only about three percent of the water on Earth is fresh and there are about seven billion people. If we're not careful, the water could go down the drain. Everyone has seen pictures of oil and other pollutants in water, but I don't think they take them seriously. In the past, DDT was a pollutant that damaged the food chain. It kept working its way upward, starting with small animals, then getting to bigger ones.
FEATURES
By Ralph Vigoda and Ralph Vigoda,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 29, 1991
CAMBRIDGE -- High overhead, in an aerial pas de deux, two large birds swayed on the air currents. I focused the binoculars to make sure.Yep. A couple of bald eagles.In a dead tree not far away, a golden eagle sat perfectly still, surveying the surroundings.Nearby, a great blue heron moved stealthily near the muddy embankment. Pausing for a second, it suddenly dipped its head and plucked a perch out of the ankle-deep -- do herons have ankles? -- water.Elsewhere, ospreys hovered, Canada geese floated, black ducks paddled and red-winged blackbirds balanced on the tips of tall grasses.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2003
A week after opening with a devastating loss at Morgan State, Towson took out its frustrations on Division II Lock Haven last night at Minnegan Field at Towson Stadium. In their first meeting, the Tigers dominated throughout, cleared their bench and romped to a 50-19 victory to end a three-game losing streak that stretched back to 2002. "I feel we had a great week of practice, prepared better and were a lot more focused for this game," Towson coach Gordy Combs said. "It was definitely a confidence booster for ourselves," added tailback Mikal Lundy, who rushed for a career-high 121 yards and scored two touchdowns.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
Baltimore County is encouraging residents to take advantage of beaches, concerts and other recreation activities close to home through a new tourism campaign. Officials launched the promotion Thursday at Marshy Point Nature Center, a 400-acre park on a peninsula that juts into the Chesapeake Bay. "We want to make it easier than ever for everyone to find lots to do right here in Baltimore County," said County Executive James T. Smith Jr., speaking from a pier while kayakers paddled on Dungee Creek.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
After his mother died suddenly 21/2 years ago, Craig Federroll, a small-business owner from Pasadena, found himself so heartsick that he couldn't sleep. He tossed and turned. His mind roamed. He decided he needed some kind of project to channel his grief. The father of two grade-schoolers, he thought of a tree fort. He'd grown up playing in them, after all, and the sawing might be good therapy. Two months later, he'd completed a structure like none his neighbors on the Magothy had ever seen: a four-story replica of a pirate ship, each level connected to the others by hatches and ladders, its crow's nest towering 40 feet above the riverbank.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1994
Our national symbol is back from the brink -- though still scarred by three centuries of abuse.Twenty-seven years after officially being declared in danger of extinction, the spunky bald eagle has recovered enough from pollution, shooting and destruction of habitat to be taken off the critical list.The move by the federal government comes just in time for the Fourth of July. And part of the Chesapeake Bay's soaring eagle )) population will be used as a prop.Mollie Beattie, director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will visit Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge tomorrow to announce plans to upgrade from "endangered" to "threatened" the bird's status across most of the nation.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
Maryland Natural Resources Police is investigating the shooting death of a bald eagle that was found Friday in Allegany County near the Pennsylvania line. The mature eagle was found by a farm caretaker along the banks of Evitts Creek, just west of Rocky Gap State Park. "It was probably sitting in a tree when it was shot in the chest," said NRP Sgt. Art Windemuth. "It couldn't have been mistaken for anything else. It had the white head and tail and golden beak and talons. It was the American symbol in full plumage.
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