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Bald Eagles

NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
Who has been poisoning bald eagles on Maryland's Eastern Shore? An 18-month investigation into four poisoned birds - one of which died - has hit a dead end, and federal authorities announced a $2,500 reward yesterday for additional information. "We suspect, because of what our lab results have told us, that they were poisoned with a pesticide," said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent Bryce Findley. "Unfortunately, our investigation has stalled out at this point. We have explored several avenues, and thus far we have not found the perpetrator."
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
Biologists are trying to determine what killed a bald eagle found yesterday in Crownsville. The eagle was discovered about 6 a.m. in the front yard of a home in the 1100 block of St. Stephens Church Road, said John Surrick, a Department of Natural Resources spokesman. A DNR officer gave the bird to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is conducting an investigation of the eagle's death. The cause was not immediately apparent. "There were no visible signs of any injury," said Chris Brong, a special agent for the Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | September 3, 1998
ALBANY, N.Y. - New York bald eagles are soaring again.To the list of wildlife comeback successes in New York topped off by the white-tail deer, wild turkey and striped bass, add our national bird. But do so quietly, and still with fingers crossed.Bald eagles were close to extinction here 20 years ago. There was only one native adult breeding pair left in New York state in 1976, in the Montezuma refuge near Syracuse, when the state began an ambitious, $500,000 resettlement program of eaglets from Alaska.
NEWS
By Zanto Peabody and Zanto Peabody,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
The first two hours on Triadelphia Reservoir were deja vu for Raymond Hohl, trolling the banks of the reservoir for bald eagles and issuing his stock warning, "We probably won't see them."Hohl, a law enforcement officer who monitors wildlife around the reservoir, had been charged more than once with leading visitors on ill-timed quests to find Howard County's only nesting pair of eagles. On this 92-degree day in July, both logic and the patrol boat, which had to have a leaky replacement fuel tank repaired, pointed to another futile search.
SPORTS
By Daniel Popper and The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
As a senior at Poly in 2009, Antoine Goodson was a star quarterback garnering legitimate interest from Division I football programs, including Maryland, Georgia Tech and West Virginia. In his first two games that season, Goodson accounted for 635 total yards and eight touchdowns. But his dream turned into a nightmare less than a month into the season when he suffered a dislocated throwing shoulder; Goodson would eventually need surgery to repair ligament damage. After the injuries, not a single Division I program remained interested in him as a quarterback.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
OXON HILL - Like a lot of people, it seems, bald eagles enjoy watching construction work. Defying biologists' expectations, a pair of the threatened species has built a home here on the Maryland shore of the Potomac River, in the very midst of the construction of the new $2.5 billion Woodrow Wilson Bridge. The noise and commotion do not bother the birds. In fact, they seem to like it. The eagles spend their days watching hundreds of workers labor over the new bridge, thousands of cars and trucks zoom (or inch)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ronald Hube and Ronald Hube,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2005
While zipping through the Eastern Shore city of Cambridge on the way to the ocean, most folks have no idea that just to the south are tidal marshes so scenic and vast that they have been dubbed the "Everglades of Maryland." Indeed, southern Dorchester County looks more like Florida than the Mid-Atlantic. And like the Sunshine State, the region is home to a high concentration of nesting bald eagles, which will be celebrated Saturday during the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge's popular eagle festival.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
A new bald eagle has taken up residence at the Baltimore Zoo. It's a majestic bird found in a place not usually associated with such creatures: Halethorpe, a community crisscrossed by rail lines and highways. State wildlife officials captured the male eagle, which has an injured wing, in a stretch of parkland near an interstate in southwest Baltimore County. The bird was taken to the zoo, which is designated as the area's first-aid center for eagles and falcons. The timing couldn't have been better.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | January 9, 2006
The Conowingo Dam is a magnet for eagle-watchers. Here, as the waters of the Susquehanna River surge through the gates of the 4,500-foot-long dam, anywhere from a half-dozen to 40 bald eagles can be seen perched on electrical transmission towers, soaring overhead and swooping into the frothing current for a meal. Getting the perfect shot with that digital camera, however, is a little harder. Bob Dorsch of Newark, Del., recently was explaining the nature-themed few days he had in store for grandsons Benjamin Dorsch, 9, and Cameron Dorsch, 6, when an eagle suddenly flew overhead.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | July 4, 2001
Proud Patriot The bald eagle was chosen on June 20, 1782, as the emblem of the United States of America because of its strength and majestic looks. The image of the eagle can be seen on all gold coins, the silver dollar, half dollars and quarters. What's for Dinner? Bald eagles live along the coastline and near water, so their diet is mostly fish. Do you know? How fast can an eagle fly? Answer: Some migrating eagles can catch columns of rising air and reach speeds of 30 miles per hour!
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