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By Louise Vest | August 26, 2011
100 Years Ago Preachin' and a play In the bulletin section of the Times: "Emory M.E. church Sunday school 8:30 a.m. Preaching 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. by Rev. W.A. Koontz. There will be no services except Sunday school at Providence on Sunday afternoon. Preaching at 8 p.m. Song service at 7:30 p.m. The entertaining Comedy Drama, 'Diamonds and Hearts,' will be given by the Rockland Dramatic club in the large dining room of the Howard House Ellicott City Friday night, September first at 8 P..M.
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FEATURES
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Will it be Scout? Sioux? Vega? The first bald eagle to land at Baltimore's zoo in a decade is finishing a mandatory quarantine and preparing to meet visitors for the first time later this month. But first, the female bald eagle needs a name. Zoo keepers at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore have come up with five possibilities and want the public's help picking one through an online poll. The eagle, which came from the National Aviary in Pittsburgh, currently has just a species name - Haliaeetus leucocephalus, which in Latin means "sea eagle with white head.
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NEWS
March 20, 2012
I was disturbed by your article about the Arapaho tribe seeking to claim more bald eagles for use in their religious ceremonies ("Arapaho tribe looks to claim more bald eagles," March 18). The tribe displays no religiosity or spirituality with this senseless superstition that does nothing but destroy innocent life. Once again, this is cruelty cloaked in religion. Joyce Robinson, Glen Burnie
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
The Maryland Zoo is calling all birds of a feather to help name its new bald eagle. The contest, which opened on Independence Day and runs through July 14, is asking the public to name its newest avian resident, a female eagle found in North Carolina in 2009 that is estimated to be about 5-years-old. Though efforts were made to rehabilitate the bird, it was determined that she wouldn't be likely to survive if released back into the wild, according to the zoo's website. The zoo's staff previously selected five finalists: Annie (for gunfighter Annie Oakley)
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Federal wildlife officials are offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the conviction of the person who killed a pair of bald eagles in Talbot County last Monday. The carcasses were found by a resident near the intersection of Kitty's Corner and State Road 328, just south of Tuckahoe Creek. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials believe the eagles were the victims of secondary poisoning after feeding on a dead fox. Bald eagles are no longer listed under the Endangered Species Act, but they are federally protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Maximum fines under these acts are $100,000 and $15,000 respectively, with possible imprisonment up to one year.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
Bald eagles have returned in strong numbers to Aberdeen Proving Ground this winter. Warm weather along the Atlantic seaboard last winter kept them from flying south to APG.Army and state biologists conducting an annual aerial survey saw 64 adult and 48 immature bald eagles last Sunday at APG, the state's premier roosting site for the endangered national symbol.The increase over last year -- when only 65 bald eagles and one golden eagle were spotted -- marks a resurgent trend in the base's bird population since the eagle counts began in 1979.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | February 10, 1991
Last year, 263 bald eagles were counted in Maryland's midwinter survey at Aberdeen Proving Grounds near the head of Chesapeake Bay and at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge. This year, the January survey turned up 115 bald eagles and two golden eagles.Glenn Therres, supervisor of nongame and urban wildlife for the Department of Natural Resources, said, however, that the lower count does not mean Maryland's portion of the endangered bald eagle population is in further jeopardy.
NEWS
By Joel McCord | June 7, 1991
The bald eagle was mad. Hunkered down in a corner of a stable at the Baltimore Zoo's animal hospital, the bird glared at anyone who had the temerity to peer through the bars.It wasn't bad enough that her left wing was broken, or that she has been cooped up in the zoo hospital for a month, or that her feathers had been clipped. But someone had dragged the national symbol out and posed her for pictures a few minutes ago. And she was mad."They don't like to be handled," said Dr. Michael Cranfield, the zoo's chief veterinarian.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | July 29, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Upset by a jury's decision? Don't appeal. Don't call Stephen L. Miles. Just make like the U.S. men's Olympic volleyball team, and shave your head.In our litigious society, we would all go bald.That's what the volleyball players are, bald eagles upholding the grand tradition of protest on which this nation is founded.They have a point, but yesterday they nearly lost their heads as well as their hair, narrowly defeating Canada, 3-2, with a 16-14 victory in the final game.
NEWS
By Scott Harper and Scott Harper,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 19, 2002
PORTSMOUTH, Va. - Wildlife biologists are baffled and intrigued by two incidents captured on videotape at a bald eagle nest in Portsmouth - an eagle parent attacks, kills, then eats its two scrawny young. "We've never seen anything like this," said Bryan Watts, director of the Center for Conservation Biology at the College of William and Mary, which was monitoring the nest with a 24-hour camera. Watts and colleague Mitchell Byrd, a renowned eagle expert in Virginia, contacted other scientists after viewing the footage and found that cannibalism among the nation's signature bird has never been documented or even suspected.
NEWS
May 3, 2014
One can always hear a great "spin" in a story, particularly when the authors are activists for a cause. I refer to the commentary concerning wind turbines in Somerset County ( "A wind-win situation," April 21). Authors Tom Vinson and Bruce Burcat are paid individuals whose job is to promote wind and renewable energy regardless of some factual information. First, the $200 million dollar project is a number that has somehow appeared with little actual data behind it. Sounds good though.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Maryland Natural Resources Police are investigating the killing of two bald eagles in Montgomery County over the past week. The first was shot with a rifle at about 3 p.m. on Christmas Day while feeding on a deer carcass in a field that adjoins Georgia Avenue and Bordley Road in Brookville, according to a police news release. Then, on Saturday morning, another eagle was found wounded by a bird shot near a residence on Deakins Lane in Darnestown, the release said. The bird later died of its injuries.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
A wind power project proposed on the lower Eastern Shore that's struggling to overcome objections from the Navy has a new, airborne worry - bald eagles. Federal wildlife biologists say the population of the once-rare national bird has grown so much that there are about 400 bald eagles along the mid-Atlantic coast, including 30 nests within 10 miles of the project in Somerset County, and three in the immediate vicinity. Declaring the area "extremely attractive" to the birds, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has warned the developer of the Great Bay wind project that it "appears to present significant risk to eagles" and urged it to scale back its plans.
EXPLORE
April 26, 2013
I think people should try to conserve water and not pollute it. Water is the primary resource people and animals need to live. Only about three percent of the water on Earth is fresh and there are about seven billion people. If we're not careful, the water could go down the drain. Everyone has seen pictures of oil and other pollutants in water, but I don't think they take them seriously. In the past, DDT was a pollutant that damaged the food chain. It kept working its way upward, starting with small animals, then getting to bigger ones.
SPORTS
By Daniel Popper and The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
As a senior at Poly in 2009, Antoine Goodson was a star quarterback garnering legitimate interest from Division I football programs, including Maryland, Georgia Tech and West Virginia. In his first two games that season, Goodson accounted for 635 total yards and eight touchdowns. But his dream turned into a nightmare less than a month into the season when he suffered a dislocated throwing shoulder; Goodson would eventually need surgery to repair ligament damage. After the injuries, not a single Division I program remained interested in him as a quarterback.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Federal wildlife officials are offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the conviction of the person who killed a pair of bald eagles in Talbot County last Monday. The carcasses were found by a resident near the intersection of Kitty's Corner and State Road 328, just south of Tuckahoe Creek. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials believe the eagles were the victims of secondary poisoning after feeding on a dead fox. Bald eagles are no longer listed under the Endangered Species Act, but they are federally protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Maximum fines under these acts are $100,000 and $15,000 respectively, with possible imprisonment up to one year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 1998
A fierce demeanor, a distinctive white head and tail, and a wingspan of up to 8 feet endow the bald eagle with a majesty that few wild animals can equal. Add to this a range restricted to North America, and it is fitting that, in 1782, this bird was adopted as the national symbol of the United States. Yet from that time forward the bald eagle has been buffeted by ill winds."He is a bird of bad moral character," Benjamin Franklin said in a 1784 letter to his daughter, referring to the eagle's occasional practice of stealing fish from the osprey.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
The bald eagle population of the Chesapeake Bay watershed has reached its highest point in decades, according to figures to be released today by the EPA's Chesapeake Bay program. The national bird remains on the endangered species list but is on its way to recovery, program spokesman Christopher Conner said yesterday. Researchers conducting an annual baywide count found a nest with a fledgling in the District of Columbia, the first time since the 1940s. The recovery can be attributed to improvements in water quality and eagle restoration efforts, said Frank Dawson, chairman of the bay program's living resources subcommittee.
NEWS
March 20, 2012
I was disturbed by your article about the Arapaho tribe seeking to claim more bald eagles for use in their religious ceremonies ("Arapaho tribe looks to claim more bald eagles," March 18). The tribe displays no religiosity or spirituality with this senseless superstition that does nothing but destroy innocent life. Once again, this is cruelty cloaked in religion. Joyce Robinson, Glen Burnie
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
Maryland Natural Resources Police is investigating the shooting death of a bald eagle that was found Friday in Allegany County near the Pennsylvania line. The mature eagle was found by a farm caretaker along the banks of Evitts Creek, just west of Rocky Gap State Park. "It was probably sitting in a tree when it was shot in the chest," said NRP Sgt. Art Windemuth. "It couldn't have been mistaken for anything else. It had the white head and tail and golden beak and talons. It was the American symbol in full plumage.
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