Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBald
IN THE NEWS

Bald

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
The newlyweds, a pair of bald eagles, found a dream house for the 1994 nesting season: a tall tree on the southern tip of Kent Island with a breathtaking view of the Chesapeake Bay.No sooner had the female settled down on her eggs when -- there goes the neighborhood! A construction crew began clearing land for a new house barely 100 yards away, part of a residential development planned for years.Bald eagles have flown back from the brink of extinction, as federal wildlife officials announced last week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Will it be Scout? Sioux? Vega? The first bald eagle to land at Baltimore's zoo in a decade is finishing a mandatory quarantine and preparing to meet visitors for the first time later this month. But first, the female bald eagle needs a name. Zoo keepers at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore have come up with five possibilities and want the public's help picking one through an online poll. The eagle, which came from the National Aviary in Pittsburgh, currently has just a species name - Haliaeetus leucocephalus, which in Latin means "sea eagle with white head.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
For the first time on record, bald eagles are nesting in Howard County, giving local bird watchers plenty of opportunity to spot a bird near extinction in 1973 because of the pesticide DDT.In the Triadelphia Watershed, a thin strip of forest following the Patuxent River and sandwiched between the suburbs of Baltimore and Washington, two adult eagles have built a nest and raised five offspring in three years."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
The Maryland Zoo is calling all birds of a feather to help name its new bald eagle. The contest, which opened on Independence Day and runs through July 14, is asking the public to name its newest avian resident, a female eagle found in North Carolina in 2009 that is estimated to be about 5-years-old. Though efforts were made to rehabilitate the bird, it was determined that she wouldn't be likely to survive if released back into the wild, according to the zoo's website. The zoo's staff previously selected five finalists: Annie (for gunfighter Annie Oakley)
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2003
Gary M. Bald, head of the FBI's Baltimore office for the past 14 months, has been promoted to the agency's third-highest anti-terrorism post at headquarters in Washington. Jennifer Smith Love, one of Bald's assistants, has been named acting special agent in charge in Baltimore until a permanent replacement is found. Bald, a 26-year FBI veteran, started his new job yesterday as inspector-deputy assistant director of the FBI's counterterrorism division. He was appointed Thursday. "It's one of those things when the director calls, you're here," Bald said, reflecting on how quickly the change in jobs occurred.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2002
Gary M. Bald, a 25-year FBI veteran who oversaw the investigation of a rogue Boston agent who protected gangster informants from prosecution, has been tapped to head the FBI's Maryland-Delaware office, the bureau said yesterday. Bald, 48, is a Maryland native but has never worked from the FBI's Baltimore office. As special agent in charge, he will oversee more than 300 employees, including 200 special agents. He is expected to begin work in Baltimore next week. Bald was not available to comment yesterday.
NEWS
By Robert F. Worth and Robert F. Worth,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2002
NEW YORK - It was a hot day to learn how to fly. But two of the four baby bald eagles that were brought to Inwood Hill Park on June 20 were doing just that, having been released from their treehouse cage. "They're doing fine," Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe said at what he called a "coming-out party" to report on the eagles' progress not far from their leafy aerie at the northern tip of Manhattan. The eaglets, which were taken from nests in the wilds of Wisconsin, are the first to grow up in New York City since the 19th century, Parks Department officials said.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | March 5, 2008
Severna Park's Brad Bald, a 6-foot-8, 215-pound senior center and an Archbishop Spalding transfer, emerged as the Anne Arundel County public schools league's top big man this season. Averaging 17.7 points and 12.8 rebounds with 18 double doubles, Bald scored in double digits in every game this season and turned the Falcons (15-7) into a contender for the 4A East region. He and his brother, junior Brendan Bald, who is averaging 11.9 points, transferred together at the end of last year to Severna Park and had an immediate impact.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1998
It was a beautiful day to fly; the air was still and undisturbed beneath scalloped clouds.H97-99 rattled in the carry box. He was home: He could smell it; he wanted out. The moment the gate was lifted he hobbled onto the grass in that awkward way of great birds when aground, mightily annoyed. He wasted no time, he was up into the pearl sky beating toward the gray line of Port Deposit across the river, then turning sharply west. Within 15 seconds he was out of sight.How disappointing. There had been little time to regard the bald eagle's flight.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
Seven young bald eagles mired in a sludge pond at a Charles County gravel quarry prompted a dramatic helicopter rescue yesterday by state and federal wildlife workers. Three of the eagles died and the other four were taken to the Baltimore Zoo hospital last night for emergency veterinary care. Rescuers revived the injured eagles by scraping mud from their nostrils, said John Porcari, spokesman for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The three that died appeared to have suffocated, he said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Maryland Natural Resources Police are investigating the killing of two bald eagles in Montgomery County over the past week. The first was shot with a rifle at about 3 p.m. on Christmas Day while feeding on a deer carcass in a field that adjoins Georgia Avenue and Bordley Road in Brookville, according to a police news release. Then, on Saturday morning, another eagle was found wounded by a bird shot near a residence on Deakins Lane in Darnestown, the release said. The bird later died of its injuries.
SPORTS
By Daniel Popper and The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
As a senior at Poly in 2009, Antoine Goodson was a star quarterback garnering legitimate interest from Division I football programs, including Maryland, Georgia Tech and West Virginia. In his first two games that season, Goodson accounted for 635 total yards and eight touchdowns. But his dream turned into a nightmare less than a month into the season when he suffered a dislocated throwing shoulder; Goodson would eventually need surgery to repair ligament damage. After the injuries, not a single Division I program remained interested in him as a quarterback.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Federal wildlife officials are offering a $2,500 reward for information leading to the conviction of the person who killed a pair of bald eagles in Talbot County last Monday. The carcasses were found by a resident near the intersection of Kitty's Corner and State Road 328, just south of Tuckahoe Creek. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials believe the eagles were the victims of secondary poisoning after feeding on a dead fox. Bald eagles are no longer listed under the Endangered Species Act, but they are federally protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Maximum fines under these acts are $100,000 and $15,000 respectively, with possible imprisonment up to one year.
NEWS
March 20, 2012
I was disturbed by your article about the Arapaho tribe seeking to claim more bald eagles for use in their religious ceremonies ("Arapaho tribe looks to claim more bald eagles," March 18). The tribe displays no religiosity or spirituality with this senseless superstition that does nothing but destroy innocent life. Once again, this is cruelty cloaked in religion. Joyce Robinson, Glen Burnie
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2011
Maryland Natural Resources Police is investigating the shooting death of a bald eagle that was found Friday in Allegany County near the Pennsylvania line. The mature eagle was found by a farm caretaker along the banks of Evitts Creek, just west of Rocky Gap State Park. "It was probably sitting in a tree when it was shot in the chest," said NRP Sgt. Art Windemuth. "It couldn't have been mistaken for anything else. It had the white head and tail and golden beak and talons. It was the American symbol in full plumage.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | August 26, 2011
100 Years Ago Preachin' and a play In the bulletin section of the Times: "Emory M.E. church Sunday school 8:30 a.m. Preaching 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. by Rev. W.A. Koontz. There will be no services except Sunday school at Providence on Sunday afternoon. Preaching at 8 p.m. Song service at 7:30 p.m. The entertaining Comedy Drama, 'Diamonds and Hearts,' will be given by the Rockland Dramatic club in the large dining room of the Howard House Ellicott City Friday night, September first at 8 P..M.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
RAGGED POINT - The mother eagle was hissing, brandishing her talons and otherwise causing a ruckus - her way of letting Craig Koppie know she would have none of his plan to spirit one of her eaglets off to Vermont. But Koppie, an endangered species biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, would not be deterred. With help from his New England colleague, Michael Amaral, he would get the bird and two others to Vermont, the only state in the lower 48 without a breeding bald eagle population.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
ON JULY 4 of next year, if all goes as federal wildlife officials plan, the bald eagle will be celebrated as officially "recovered," a triumph for the Endangered Species Act that protected it for 33 years.So why won't Virginia ornithologist Mitchell A. Byrd, dean of the Chesapeake's eagle researchers, be cheering?His reasons are caution about eagles, but also about assuming too readily what a sustainable balance between people and the rest of nature truly requires.Byrd and his colleagues at the Center for Conservation Biology, at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, agree that the bald eagle has made an inspiring comeback.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2008
The term "male pattern baldness" is familiar to most people. But many women, too, suffer from hair loss, says Lisa Earnest Ishii, assistant professor for facial plastic and reconstructive surgery in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's department of otolaryngology and neck surgery. Everyone "sheds" or loses some hair; what do doctors consider "hair loss" that could lead to thinning of the hair or balding? In general, hair loss greater than 100 hairs a day is considered abnormal. Otherwise, it is based upon what you see: Obviously, if you start to see the scalp showing through the hair, that is abnormal.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | April 28, 2008
"Give me a head with hair, long beautiful hair ... My hair like Jesus wore it, Hallelujah, I adore it." That ode to flowing locks, from the 1968 hippie musical Hair, would not have served yesterday as a rallying cry for the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity at the Johns Hopkins University. Instead of clinging to vanity and visions of Samson-like valor, a half-dozen SigEp brothers submitted, with only minor bouts of trepidation, to a good shearing for a good cause. "It's going to be painful," said Christopher Viemeister, 20, the fraternity's philanthropy chairman, as he and his wavy brown mane prepared to go under the electric shaver.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.