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By PETER SCHMUCK | July 15, 2007
News item: Troy Ellerman, the lawyer who leaked BALCO grand jury testimony to two Bay Area reporters, has been sentenced to 2 1/2 years in jail. My take: That would be 26 months more than Victor Conte, the admitted ringleader of one of the most notorious drug scandals in the history of professional sports. In some strange parallel legal universe, I'm sure this makes perfect sense. News item: In a related development, New York Yankees first baseman Jason Giambi met with baseball steroids investigator George Mitchell and his staff Friday, but little was revealed publicly about the interview.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | July 15, 2007
News item: Troy Ellerman, the lawyer who leaked BALCO grand jury testimony to two Bay Area reporters, has been sentenced to 2 1/2 years in jail. My take: That would be 26 months more than Victor Conte, the admitted ringleader of one of the most notorious drug scandals in the history of professional sports. In some strange parallel legal universe, I'm sure this makes perfect sense. News item: In a related development, New York Yankees first baseman Jason Giambi met with baseball steroids investigator George Mitchell and his staff Friday, but little was revealed publicly about the interview.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - Steroids experts say federal prosecutors missed an opportunity to learn more about what slugger Barry Bonds did and didn't do - and perhaps strike a memorable blow against steroid use - by failing to proceed with a trial in the case of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, or BALCO. Now, the experts suggest, Bonds might as well wear a question mark on his back instead of No. 25. "The whole BALCO thing leaves us in a very unsatisfied situation," said Gary Wadler, a New York University medical professor and an expert on drugs in sports.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 18, 2007
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The news that a Colorado attorney could get two years in prison for leaking grand jury testimony in the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative investigation might be the final proof that we now live in the sports version of Bizarro World. Troy Ellerman also might be subject to a $250,000 fine for obstruction of justice for providing information to reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams, while the main culprits in the case have so far been sentenced to a total of seven months in prison.
SPORTS
February 22, 2006
If Barry Bonds doesn't break Hank Aaron's record this season, should he come back next year? Barry Bonds should be man enough to admit using drugs to get where he is. Retire and leave the record to Hank Aaron, who did it without help. David Reeves Forest Hill With the taint of steroids in his history, Barry Bonds breaking any record is almost laughable at this point. I don't think he should even come back this year. Nancy Cantville Eldersburg He will always have the BALCO thing beside the record.
SPORTS
By David Wharton, Alan Abrahamson and Tim Reiterman and David Wharton, Alan Abrahamson and Tim Reiterman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - Not long ago, Marion Jones was a darling of the American sports scene, a powerful sprinter with explosive strides, a blur going down the track. Now she cuts a starkly different figure, a woman standing her ground against speculation about steroids and questions from anti-doping authorities. With the clock ticking down to the Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, and her ex-husband talking to investigators, Jones faces the specter of charges that could ban her from the games.
SPORTS
By John Jeansonne and John Jeansonne,NEWSDAY | May 21, 2004
NEW YORK - Olympic anti-doping officials believe that evidence apart from conventional drug tests not only can be used to bar athletes from this summer's games in Athens, Greece, but also can withstand threats of legal action in U.S. courts. Wednesday's Olympic suspension of Kelli White, the reigning women's world champion in the 100 and 200 meters, was based on her admission - after confronted with documents produced in the BALCO probe - that she used performance-enhancing drugs. But even without the confessions of athletes - something that's usually unheard of - the U.S. Olympic Committee and U.S. Anti-Doping Agency are moving ahead with an effort to ensure only "clean" athletes compete in Athens by pursuing "non-analytical positives."
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - Barry Bonds won his record seventh Most Valuable Player award yesterday, putting him back in another batter's box, where the national media peppered him with questions about the steroid controversy that surrounded his 2004 season. This is what it's come to for Bonds. No other baseball player has won more than three MVP awards, and at age 40, Bonds just claimed his fourth consecutive National League MVP award for the San Francisco Giants. Yet, Bonds' afternoon conference call with reporters included as many questions about the BALCO steroid controversy as it did questions about his place in history.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2004
NEW YORK - Meet the Press wasn't just a Sunday staple for politicians yesterday, as Marion Jones and Michael Phelps received radically different receptions at the U.S. Olympic Committee's Media Summit. Jones, the track and field star of the 2000 Olympics, was grilled about the BALCO steroids scandal and the perception that she is a cheat. She threatened legal action if the USOC attempts to keep her out of the Olympics. Phelps, conversely, did not face one question about drugs. A year removed from Towson High, Phelps is a fresh-faced swimming sensation who is expected to do big things at this summer's games in Athens, Greece.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 29, 2004
Barry Bonds is one angry hombre. He arrived at spring training to find there are people - even fellow players - who believe that he might have achieved his Michelin Man physique with something other than whey protein shakes and an intense workout regimen. Never mind that his personal trainer was indicted recently for distributing steroids to high-profile athletes. Never mind that he has bulked up so radically over the past 10 years that he came under suspicion of steroid use long before his name appeared on the witness list in the BALCO grand jury investigation.
SPORTS
March 9, 2006
A sampling of opinion from papers around the country on Barry Bonds: Lisa Olson, New York Daily News: If Barry Bonds is smart - and there's no proof he's ever been Mensa material - he wouldn't put away his blond wig and falsies just yet. If ever Bonds needed a disguise, it is now. If he cared about repairing the great damage he has done to a great game, he wouldn't dare show his freakishly massive head in any ballpark ever again. If he had any decency left in his needle-pricked behind, he would slip quietly into the shadows with all the other selfish cheats and greedy liars and never be heard from again.
SPORTS
February 22, 2006
If Barry Bonds doesn't break Hank Aaron's record this season, should he come back next year? Barry Bonds should be man enough to admit using drugs to get where he is. Retire and leave the record to Hank Aaron, who did it without help. David Reeves Forest Hill With the taint of steroids in his history, Barry Bonds breaking any record is almost laughable at this point. I don't think he should even come back this year. Nancy Cantville Eldersburg He will always have the BALCO thing beside the record.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - Steroids experts say federal prosecutors missed an opportunity to learn more about what slugger Barry Bonds did and didn't do - and perhaps strike a memorable blow against steroid use - by failing to proceed with a trial in the case of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, or BALCO. Now, the experts suggest, Bonds might as well wear a question mark on his back instead of No. 25. "The whole BALCO thing leaves us in a very unsatisfied situation," said Gary Wadler, a New York University medical professor and an expert on drugs in sports.
SPORTS
By Elliott Almond and Sean Webby and Elliott Almond and Sean Webby,SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | July 15, 2005
SAN JOSE, Calif. - BALCO Laboratories founder Victor Conte Jr. struck a deal with federal prosecutors late yesterday that includes a four-month prison term and four months of house detention in a case that sparked the biggest sports drug scandal in history, the San Jose Mercury News has learned. The case against Conte - the centerpiece of the government's internationally publicized criminal investigation into steroids - looks to be resolved with pleas to two felonies and a short stay in a minimum-security prison.
SPORTS
By Jim Baumbach and Jim Baumbach,NEWSDAY | February 11, 2005
NEW YORK - In one of the most unusual news conferences in New York Yankees history, Jason Giambi broke his silence yesterday, but he didn't say much ... including the word "steroids." Making his first public appearance since it was revealed in the San Francisco Chronicle late last year that he admitted to a federal grand jury he took steroids for three seasons, Giambi opened by apologizing to fans, teammates and the Yankees' organization. But when pressed to explain what he was sorry for, Giambi repeatedly said he was advised not to go into detail, citing his "ongoing legal matters."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 29, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - If Navy is so concerned about the size of the New Mexico defensive line, the key to victory in tomorrow's Emerald Bowl is just a few miles up the freeway. There's this lab over in Burlingame, Calif., where they can do something to level the playing field. That's not funny, of course, but the proximity of Navy's bowl game to the infamous BALCO scandal simply amplifies all that is great about the purer form of college football that is played at the military academies. The Midshipmen always look undersized and overmatched when they face a major college program, but that's because the Naval Academy is one of the few Division I institutions that still has its helmet on straight when it comes to intercollegiate athletics.
SPORTS
March 9, 2006
A sampling of opinion from papers around the country on Barry Bonds: Lisa Olson, New York Daily News: If Barry Bonds is smart - and there's no proof he's ever been Mensa material - he wouldn't put away his blond wig and falsies just yet. If ever Bonds needed a disguise, it is now. If he cared about repairing the great damage he has done to a great game, he wouldn't dare show his freakishly massive head in any ballpark ever again. If he had any decency left in his needle-pricked behind, he would slip quietly into the shadows with all the other selfish cheats and greedy liars and never be heard from again.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 18, 2007
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The news that a Colorado attorney could get two years in prison for leaking grand jury testimony in the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative investigation might be the final proof that we now live in the sports version of Bizarro World. Troy Ellerman also might be subject to a $250,000 fine for obstruction of justice for providing information to reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams, while the main culprits in the case have so far been sentenced to a total of seven months in prison.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2004
The anti-doping net that has snared some of baseball's biggest names and imperiled the careers of other athletes appears ready to drop on the one-time queen of track and field. Marion Jones, who won five medals at the 2000 Summer Games, will be investigated by a disciplinary panel, the International Olympic Committee announced yesterday. On Friday, Victor Conte told ABC's 20/20 that he watched Jones inject herself with performance-enhancing drugs produced at his Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative.
NEWS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2004
New York Yankees slugger Jason Giambi became the new face of baseball's steroid scandal yesterday, when a published report revealed his admission, in grand jury testimony, that he took steroids provided by the personal trainer of San Francisco Giants star Barry Bonds. Giambi, 33, had publicly denied using steroids, but the San Francisco Chronicle obtained his testimony in the federal inquiry in the BALCO labs case from December 2003, in which he describes using a syringe to inject human growth hormone into his stomach and testosterone into his buttocks.
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