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Balancing Act

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NEWS
January 10, 2014
There's a simple rule of economics: Raise wages and fewer people will have jobs. A little overtime here and there is better than a person with full benefits, etc. The issue of the minimum wage needs prudent and careful consideration, especially when President Barack Obama and his crew have done nothing to create the so-called shovel ready jobs ( "The agenda," Jan. 8). Remember, the Maryland General Assembly is composed of lawyers, not business people. F. Cordell - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The Ravens are approaching the time when they'll need to focus on getting backup running back Bernard Pierce the bulk of the workload in advance of starter Ray Rice's two-game suspension. The balancing act between how the Ravens should divide carries between Pierce and Rice is expected to become more of a hot-button issue heading into their third preseason game next week against the Washington Redskins. The third preseason game is when the Ravens traditionally play the starters into the third quarter since they won't play in the fourth and final preseason game prior to the start of the regular season.
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NEWS
April 22, 2013
In Baltimore County, like much of Maryland, tax revenues have flat-lined. State aid for such things as road resurfacing is not much better. County workers won't be receiving cost-of-living increases for the fifth year in a row. Yet amid all this austerity, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz last week proposed a budget that finances new schools and retrofits many others with air conditioning. There are millions of dollars for new school security systems, for a new family resource center on the east side of the county and for new technology for police.
NEWS
By Isaac Howley | June 25, 2014
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on the harms of smoking, which launched anti-tobacco public health efforts that have saved an estimated 8 million American lives. We are today a far more educated public when it comes to the dangers of cigarette use. Yet a bill in the Maryland House of Delegates that would treat e-cigarettes like normal cigarettes, and thus ban their use in public buildings, was roundly defeated this year. The bill didn't even make it out of committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
When Robert Muraine is performing the intricate, rhythmic, robotic form of dance known as popping, it's easy to imagine that every single part of his body — including the vertebrae in his spinal column — has a mind of its own. When a finger insistently taps his temple, Muraine seems as surprised as anyone when his head moves jerkily towards the ground while the rest of his body remains proudly upright. In the summer of 2008, Muraine, now 23, became a pop culture phenomenon when he auditioned for Fox's blockbuster reality television show, "So You Think You Can Dance?"
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | January 28, 1994
PRESIDENT Clinton's State of the Union address won high praise among viewers for eloquence and resolve. But it is also instructive to review the speech as a strategic document.Mr. Clinton's themes offered a delicate balancing act -- between a traditional Democratic blue-collar base and a worried middle class, New Democrats and New Dealers, budget balancers and big spenders. Consider:* Budget Bondage. Mr. Clinton's quandary is excruciating. Though the deficit has come down dramatically, polls show that voters still don't trust the administration on budget discipline.
NEWS
By Isaac Howley | June 25, 2014
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Surgeon General's report on the harms of smoking, which launched anti-tobacco public health efforts that have saved an estimated 8 million American lives. We are today a far more educated public when it comes to the dangers of cigarette use. Yet a bill in the Maryland House of Delegates that would treat e-cigarettes like normal cigarettes, and thus ban their use in public buildings, was roundly defeated this year. The bill didn't even make it out of committee.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | July 30, 2013
Forgive Buck Showalter for displaying a certain ambivalence toward Wednesday's 4 p.m. deadline for teams to make trades without passing players through waivers. There's definitely a fine line there. If you're the manager of a team that went to the playoffs last year and is currently in the second wild-card position, you don't want to be broadcasting that you're dissatisfied with anyone on your roster. So he did his best Tuesday to talk around some of the trade speculation that has attached to his team.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 2001
MOAB, Utah - Like ants on the lip of a giant bowl, swarms of tourists wait at the top of a red rock amphitheater for their turn to pose beneath towering Delicate Arch, one of the most famous landmarks crafted by Mother Nature. On most days, it is a surprisingly civilized gathering, despite the blazing desert sun. But the politeness sometimes gives way to fights that require ranger intervention. And sometimes the combatants return to the overfilled parking lot to find that someone has boxed them in. It is then that Arches National Park seems more like a theme park than a natural wonder.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 2002
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Ahmed Shahin is 28, unshaven and rarely cracks a smile. He keeps an AK-47 assault rifle strapped over his right shoulder. At first glance, he looks every bit a tough militiaman. Shahin is both a militant and a member of the Palestinian security forces. He sees no conflict in these dual roles. It is his job to protect his leaders, and, sometimes, as happened last week, it means standing with other gunmen and exchanging fire with Israeli troops. If U.S. diplomats can produce a cease-fire agreement - and it appeared yesterday that one was close - Shahin would find himself in an uncomfortable position.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Zaleski and By Andrew Zaleski | February 25, 2014
The pastor is not pleased. It's a Wednesday morning in mid-February, the first promise of temperatures topping 50 degrees in weeks, but it's cold and wet. An erratic trickle of people stops into the basement of the Church of the Guardian Angel at the corner of Huntingdon Avenue and West 27th Street, each one there for the same reason as the last: food. They collect white plastic bags of provisions - boxes of cereal, cans of vegetables - and head outside again, back into Baltimore's Remington neighborhood.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
There's a simple rule of economics: Raise wages and fewer people will have jobs. A little overtime here and there is better than a person with full benefits, etc. The issue of the minimum wage needs prudent and careful consideration, especially when President Barack Obama and his crew have done nothing to create the so-called shovel ready jobs ( "The agenda," Jan. 8). Remember, the Maryland General Assembly is composed of lawyers, not business people. F. Cordell - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | July 30, 2013
Forgive Buck Showalter for displaying a certain ambivalence toward Wednesday's 4 p.m. deadline for teams to make trades without passing players through waivers. There's definitely a fine line there. If you're the manager of a team that went to the playoffs last year and is currently in the second wild-card position, you don't want to be broadcasting that you're dissatisfied with anyone on your roster. So he did his best Tuesday to talk around some of the trade speculation that has attached to his team.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
One of the things I have been proudest of since starting this blog is late 2005 is that I have never written a post about having trouble writing a post. Sooner or later, every columnist or every fiction writer descends to writing about being unable to write. But last week, on days when I had nothing to say, I said nothing. I recommend the practice. I do regret, however, not having brought the word to Wordville that Stephen Fried has publicly apologized in The Atlantic for having invented the word fashionista . We all know words that we find odious, usually for what they signify, and fashionista and fashion-forward are words, and concepts, that I wouldn't touch with a bargepole.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
In Baltimore County, like much of Maryland, tax revenues have flat-lined. State aid for such things as road resurfacing is not much better. County workers won't be receiving cost-of-living increases for the fifth year in a row. Yet amid all this austerity, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz last week proposed a budget that finances new schools and retrofits many others with air conditioning. There are millions of dollars for new school security systems, for a new family resource center on the east side of the county and for new technology for police.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli, Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 13, 2012
For 10 weeks, the Frederick Keys were Dylan Bundy's stewards. The Orioles' High-A affiliate was charged with bringing along the 19-year-old's arm and delivering him to Double-A Bowie in better shape than he arrived, a transaction that is expected to be made with all stipulations met before Game 1 of the Baysox's doubleheader Tuesday. The Orioles invested more in Bundy than they have in any other pitcher, and the right-hander came to Frederick in late May after posting utterly goofy numbers during his stint in Low-A Delmarva (30 innings, no earned runs, five hits, and 40 strikeouts in eight starts)
NEWS
November 7, 1998
When President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed a new government for the District of Columbia three decades ago, he did so with balance in mind.It was understood, though unstated, that the government would be predominantly black for the first time, to replace the traditionally white District Commission that had only recently added its first black member.The president named Walter A. Washington, black, as mayor, and John Hechinger Sr., white, as City Council chairman. Sterling Tucker, black, was council vice chairman; John Nevius was the lone Republican and one of four whites on the nine-member body.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
Describing his spending plan for next year as a balancing act, Howard County schools Superintendent Michael E. Hickey formally presented his proposal for a 4.9 percent budget increase for 1997-98 to the school board last night.The $251.9 million plan -- which proposes hiring 238 new teachers and staff members and adding money for new textbooks and library books -- received general, albeit brief, praise from board members.In his 40-minute presentation, Hickey said the budget decisions reflect an attempt to strike a "reasonable balance" among a number of competing factors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Olivia Ignacio | June 26, 2012
After weeks of open auditions around the country, judges Howard Stern, Sharon Osbourne and Howie Mandel are in Las Vegas to narrow their current talent pool from over 100 to 48. Right off the bat, the judges gather the contestants in the Palazzo Hotel lobby and announce they have already sorted them into groups: the judges' favorites, the standbys and those who are definitely advancing to the next round. The judges' favorites will perform in Las Vegas for a chance to advance to the next stage.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
The deadline for registering at the early rate for the American Copy Editors Society's national conference in New Orleans has been extended until February 8. That would be tomorrow.  There is nowhere else that you will find as thoroughgoing an exploration of the craft of editing, with as many experiences practitioners. Alex Cruden's exploration of how readers actually read headlines has exploded many presuppositions. Bill Connolly's "Jimmy's World" has demonstrated how close reading and determined editing could have avoided a major scandal.
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