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NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 1998
George Balanchine, the presiding genius of 20th century ballet, was from Georgia, at that time a southern province of Russia, and his surname is a French contraction of his original name, Balanchivadze.Ballet historians don't make much of his Georgian ancestry, but when the Georgian State Dance Company performs at the Naval Academy tonight and the Kennedy Center in Washington Saturday, the connection should become clear.Until Balanchine, women in the world's ballet companies were graceful, willowy aristocrats or short, strong technicians.
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FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1997
As ballet lore has it, George Balanchine clapped his hands for attention at the end of class one day in 1934. "Mmmm," he said to his students. "I think we'll start something."That "something" was the ballet called "Serenade." As the title suggests, it's a nocturne, a song to the night, hushed and ephemeral as moonlight. It is also a masterpiece."Serenade" was the first ballet the Russian-born Balanchine made in America and also the first major abstract ballet in dance history. Intended as a teaching piece, it is today in the repertory of every major ballet company in the world.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
The dance students glide - and sometimes stumble noisily - across the gray wood floor. Their hair is pinned back in tight little buns, their toes are crammed into pointe shoes. The choreography has brought them center stage, staggered in four lines, with two girls lying on the floor in the middle. Judith Fugate stops the rehearsal. Something is wrong. It is day six, hour four of rehearsals for George Balanchine's ballet Serenade. The dancers - students at the Baltimore School for the Arts - are exhausted.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson | March 2, 1992
PRODIGAL SON: DANCING FOR BALANCHINE IN A WORLD OF PAIN AND MAGIC. By Edward Villella with Larry Kaplan. Simon & Schuster. 306 pages. $23.IT ISN'T surprising that Edward Villella's autobiography begins with this pronouncement: "By my count, this is at least the fifth book written by a New York City ballet dancer about George Balanchine."About George Balanchine.Not about Edward Villella, the brilliant dancer whose American athleticism left its imprint on 20th century ballet; whose appearances on the the Bell Telephone Hour and the Ed Sullivan Show demonstrated to a nation that men could be manly ballet dancers.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 25, 1997
Go figure: Ballet is at the same time one of the most popular high-culture art forms in America, and one of the most intimidating. Countless pleasure-loving people who go to museums or the opera without a second thought freeze up when it comes to tutu-and-leotard shows. What's the problem - or, as my New York friends say, what's not to like? The answer, so far as I can tell, is twofold: (1) Jargon. (2) "Swan Lake."Ballet talk is the worst jargon in the world, partly because it's mostly in French and partly because far too many balletomanes (that's ballet talk for dance buffs)
NEWS
January 7, 1996
Lincoln Kirstein, 88, the dance patron who in 1933 brought choreographer George Balanchine to the United States, transforming American ballet, died Friday in New York. Mr. Kirstein was introduced to Balanchine in London and persuaded him to move to the United States. They founded the School of American Ballet in 1933 and the New York City Ballet in 1948. Mr. Kirstein's books include "Lay This Laurel," which became a basis for the screenplay of the 1989 movie "Glory," and "Mosaic: Memoirs."
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 1996
Principal dancer Susan Farrell was one of a select group of women whom choreographer George Balanchine considered his muses and for whom he created ballets.Farrell is now a part of the George Balanchine Trust, which oversees the production of his dances worldwide. Most recently, she's been working with the Washington Ballet on staging Mozart's "Divertimento No. 15."Tuesday night there was an open rehearsal and performance at the Kennedy Center Terrace Theatre. While eight hand-picked dancers performed only two of the ballet's five sections, Farrell called the two movements, "Theme and Variations" and "Andante," the "heart of the ballet."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | April 29, 1994
Irish Forever, trained in Harford County by Billy Boniface, finished 10th yesterday in the English 1,000 Guineas at Newmarket Race Course in Newmarket, England.The Boniface runner is the first American-trained horse to compete in the mile-long race, which is the first of the English classics for 3-year-old fillies. Las Meninas, the winner, beat Irish Forever by eight lengths.Balanchine, trained in Dubai, of the United Arab Emirates, and flown in just for this race, finished second.
NEWS
November 25, 1994
Erick Hawkins, 85, a choreographer who danced with George Balanchine and Martha Graham and later founded his own dance company, died in New York on Wednesday of cancer. Mr. Hawkins was the first American student at George Balanchine's School of American Ballet. Mr. Hawkins and Ms. Graham married in 1948, then divorced in 1954. President Clinton awarded Mr. Hawkins the National Medal of Arts last month.David Berg, 75, leader of The Children of God, a controversial Christian sect involved in legal conflicts across the world, is dead, his followers said in London yesterday.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | March 29, 2012
Off stage, Dana Jacobson stands a stunning 5 feet 9 inches tall, with arms and legs that go on forever. When she dances, she stretches her arabesques and lengthens her high-flying leaps to look even taller, at least 7 feet from the tips of her toes to the top of her long blond hair. This gutsy original is a sensation just walking on stage. Next week, Howard County's sweetheart ballerina will be doing much more than walking when she performs with the internationally renowned New York City Ballet at the Kennedy Center, April 3-8. Catch this high-flying, just turned 20-year-old in the Gershwin class, "Who Cares?"
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