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Balance The Budget

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NEWS
By David Nitkin, Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn and David Nitkin, Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2003
IS THE 2003 General Assembly prepared to make history? Maryland lawmakers have a long tradition of getting their work done on time and going home. Only once since 1917, when the state constitution was amended to include a balanced-budget provision, has the Assembly failed to pass a spending plan during its 90-day session. The year was 1992, and William Donald Schaefer was governor, R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. was House speaker and, yes, Thomas V. Mike Miller was president of the Senate. State tax revenues had dropped from one year to the next.
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NEWS
December 21, 2013
Let me get this straight: Capitol Hill, which is filled with $200,000-plus a year politicians - many of them multimillionaires who retire with most of their salary intact and only lose their jobs only if they get voted out of office - is telling our military men and women that they are the ones who have to take a cut in their pensions ( "Senate advances bipartisan budget agreement," Dec. 17)? Who makes the greater sacrifice: Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner dodging each other in the halls of Congress, or our military men and women dodging bullets in the sand pits of the Middle East?
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 30, 1991
Saddam is acting up again, so George won't have to balance the budget for another year.
NEWS
By Jami-Lin Williams | August 22, 2013
As an infant born in Waterville, Maine, to a single, teenage mother, I relied on food stamps for the first four months of my life. My family's economic status later required me to participate in other federal assistance programs like Head Start and the National School Lunch Program, so that I would have access to adequate nutrition and greater opportunities. Today I am a successful young woman with an undergraduate degree from Wellesley College, a master's degree from Stanford University, and a bright future.
NEWS
November 19, 1995
An article in yesterday's editions incorrectly indicated that the House and Senate had approved identical versions of the Republicans' bill to balance the budget. In fact, the Senate made minor changes to the House version before passing it. As a result, the House must now approve the Senate's version for the bill to be passed by Congress.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
October 1, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced $450 million in cuts in state spending today to balance the budget for 1992. The cuts will include laying off state workers, slashing aid to counties and cutting assistance for poor people.The Evening Sun wants to know if you think the state should raise taxes to balance the budget instead of making the cuts.Call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information system, on a Touch-Tone phone. The call is local, and answers will be registered between 10 a.m. and midnight.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 28, 1994
Wise move. A club with no players doesn't need a manager.Real fans don't want to see an 18 1/2 -hour, sensitive, socially significant documentary. They want to see a ball game.The election that was to have been about who didn't balance the budget will be about who killed health care reform.The real Peter Angelos just stood up.
NEWS
October 2, 1991
By a margin of slightly more than 6 percentage points, callers to SUNDIAL say the state should not raise taxes to balance the budget. Of 1,219 callers yesterday, 650, or 53 percent, were against raising taxes for that purpose. And 569 (46 percent) said the state should raise taxes to balance the budget.Today and tonight, The Evening Sun wants to know more about how you feel about the state budget problems and the economy overall.Call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information system, on a Touch-Tone phone.
NEWS
January 8, 1992
The General Assembly convenes today in Annapolis to begin its 1992 session with the chairman of the Budget and Taxation Committee, Sen. Laurence Levitan, D-Montgomery, calling for an increase in taxes to help the state balance the budget.Levitan's proposal specifically calls for increases in the sales tax, income tax and a nickel-a-gallon increase in the gasoline tax.The Evening Sun wants to know if you would support an increase in any of these taxes to help solve the budget crisis.Call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's telephone information system, on a Touch-Tone phone.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 12, 1995
CARBONDALE, Ill. -- Launching a week of events designed to highlight the differences between the administration and the Republicans on education spending, President Clinton told several thousand students at Southern Illinois University here that the GOP majority wanted to rob them of their futures.Mr. Clinton cited proposed reductions in the rate of spending on student loans, grants and work-study programs as evidence that the Republican majority in Congress was "short-cutting the future" in its efforts to balance the budget.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on the economy, the national debt may not have the importance attributed to it ( "Economic déjà vu," July 26). It may be just a device used by the GOP to cut social programs. The Republicans' solution to the debt is tax cuts for the wealthy, which they claim will generate jobs. That hasn't happened. President Obama has proposed revamping U.S. infrastructure as part of a massive jobs program. This hasn't happened either, largely because of Republican opposition.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
Having watched Dr. Ben Carson's speech at the National Prayer Breakfast on YouTube, I can accept his foray into politics because he has worked with people of all religions, and his scholarship fund has supported talented students regardless of race or religion ("Remarks vault Carson into the political arena," Feb. 18). Dr. Carson is a good man. Yet I am flummoxed by his railings against political correctness. Now that he is retiring, he is free to sound off, but I am sure that at Hopkins he practiced political correctness as assiduously as anyone, else he could not have survived there.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
The first 45 days of the General Assembly session were dominated by talk of marriage. The theme for the second half is shaping up to be money - and there's not enough of it. Thursday's Senate vote approving same-sex marriage in Maryland came on the eve of the halfway point of the annual 90-day session. Now legislators are turning their attention to the budget, and how exactly they will close a projected $1 billion deficit. "It feels like we are starting a second session," said Del. Guy Guzzone, a Howard County Democrat.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley acknowledged the obvious on Saturday when he told local officials at the annual Maryland Association of Counties summer conference that tax increases may be a part of the solution to the state's projected $1 billion budget shortfall next year. Tax revenues are picking up, but not fast enough to make up for the effects of the recession, and the likelihood of federal budget cuts could make the state's fiscal problems worse. We have reached the point at which some additional revenues may be necessary to protect the public infrastructure and services on which our collective prosperity is based.
NEWS
By Maureen Black and David Paige | May 12, 2011
Congress' recent efforts to balance the federal budget give new meaning to "women and children first. " The $500 million cut to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) that President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans agreed to as part of last month's budget deal pushes the nation's fiscal concerns onto the shoulders of babies. Because WIC actually reduces health care costs, it is not clear why it has been targeted for cuts. Economic analysis from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
NEWS
February 28, 2011
A Republican proposal for another two-week extension of the federal budget, floated on Friday, at least delays the prospect of a government shutdown. But it does nothing to resolve the underlying stalemate between President Barack Obama and House Republicans over their effort to cut $61 billion from the current year's budget. What makes matters worse is that even if the Republicans succeed in enacting all those cuts, it won't come close to eliminating the budget deficit, which for fiscal 2011 is estimated at $1.5 trillion.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1996
Before U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest got a chance to play the piano and sing at his town meeting in Annapolis Wednesday night, he explained to more than 70 constituents his positions on Medicare reform, capital gains tax reductions and abortion.For more than an hour, Gilchrest talked and took questions from the audience at the Maryland Hall for the Performing Arts.Gilchrest told listeners they should be optimistic about Congress' ability to balance the budget by 2002 and reform Medicare, welfare and Social Security.
NEWS
February 7, 2011
It didn't take long for certain State House tongues — not all of them Democratic — to start wagging after Del. Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio's official Republican response to Gov. Martin O'Malley's State of the State address last week. The charge was hypocrisy in the first degree, and the critics believed they caught the Eastern Shore delegate in a classic "do what I say, not what I do" moment. In her speech, Delegate Haddaway-Riccio suggested that with the state facing a projected $1.6 billion deficit, lawmakers should forgo the General Assembly's version of earmarks, the $15 million in local bond bills included in the capital budget each year.
NEWS
By Marta Hummel Mossburg | September 8, 2009
To listen to Maryland House Speaker Michael Busch, the state is starving. "You're down to bone and gristle now when it comes to state government," the Democrat recently said in response to the $454 million cut from the current budget last month by the Board of Public Works. The state has burned $736 million worth of flab from the $14 billion 2010 operating budget in the past two months. But the trims do not imperil big government in Maryland. And they resemble a series of bulimic purges more than any systemic dietary changes - meaning more rounds of cuts will be necessary to balance the budget in coming years.
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