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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 9, 1992
Lloyd and Charlotte Grove came looking for Greek food.But when the York, Pa., couple walked through the doors of the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation in Baltimore yesterday, they found much more than baklava and gyros."
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
The 41st Annual Greek Food & Cultural Festival starts Friday. This is the one at the Greek Cathedral of the Annunciation in Midtown-Belvedere, when everyone sits on the cathedral's steps in the sunshine and stuffs themselves silly. Under the big tent on Preston Street, there's stuff like gyros, souvlaki and fried calamari. But you have to go inside the cathedral and down into the basement for the baked lamb shank, spanakopita, pastitio, roast chicken and stuffed grape leaves. New this year: a Saturday night party in the tent, with a live band.
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FEATURES
By Jeannette Belliveau and By Jeannette Belliveau,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2000
Any style of cooking bound by strict rules found in the Old Testament, and molded by a people who often struggled to obtain food and spices in Poland and Russia, is likely to be highly traditional and at times austere. Yet, as that cuisine enters its fourth millennium, the winds of change are blowing strongly over Jewish cooking. And what better time to experiment with new food preparations than at Passover, the eight-day Jewish holiday that starts at sundown next Wednesday? Actually, immigrants have been adapting Jewish food to New World tastes and products ever since 1654, when the first Jewish settlers, from the Iberian Peninsula, arrived in Colonial America.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
In the Greek dessert family, galaktoboureko is like baklava's little brother: lighter and lesser known, but still prized for its combination of soft custard and crisp phyllo. Served in squares or rolls, galaktoboureko (pronounced ga-LA-to-BOUR-eko) is also much trickier to say. Though not well-known outside the Greek community, it is a dessert staple within it. And unlike baklava, it has no nuts. "Baklava is traditional and nice, but it's also a heavier dessert -- a lot more sweet," said Nora Kefalas, who will share with the public more than 700 of the rolled galaktoboureko she helped make at this weekend's St. Nicholas Greek Folk Festival.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
In the Greek dessert family, galaktoboureko is like baklava's little brother: lighter and lesser known, but still prized for its combination of soft custard and crisp phyllo. Served in squares or rolls, galaktoboureko (pronounced ga-LA-to-BOUR-eko) is also much trickier to say. Though not well-known outside the Greek community, it is a dessert staple within it. And unlike baklava, it has no nuts. "Baklava is traditional and nice, but it's also a heavier dessert -- a lot more sweet," said Nora Kefalas, who will share with the public more than 700 of the rolled galaktoboureko she helped make at this weekend's St. Nicholas Greek Folk Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
The 41st Annual Greek Food & Cultural Festival starts Friday. This is the one at the Greek Cathedral of the Annunciation in Midtown-Belvedere, when everyone sits on the cathedral's steps in the sunshine and stuffs themselves silly. Under the big tent on Preston Street, there's stuff like gyros, souvlaki and fried calamari. But you have to go inside the cathedral and down into the basement for the baked lamb shank, spanakopita, pastitio, roast chicken and stuffed grape leaves. New this year: a Saturday night party in the tent, with a live band.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff and Robin Tunnicliff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 2002
The first thing you'll probably notice about Mimi's Cafe is the length of its menu. The ratio of food choices to seats is almost 2 to 1, 113 to 62 respectively. The list of fare can be overwhelming at first. Here are a few navigational aids to keep in mind before you throw up your hands. Mimi Abdalla, the owner, is part Greek, part Egyptian. So, it's not off base to guess that he can make food from those countries pretty well. And, because he used to manage a few Al Pacino's pizza places in town before going out on his own in 1999, he probably knows pizza, too. Both assumptions held up admirably well.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2001
The work of conceptual artist Coleslaw Baklava moves through a dizzying succession of phases, not the least significant of which was his photographic investigation of parking lots. These include close-ups of reserved parking spaces. "They're about status," says A. Clarke Bedford, artist and lecturer, pointing to a slide of an untitled piece known simply as "RESERVED 796." The numbers, you see, the notion of hierarchical structure and, well, it's probably too deeply political to go into fully right here and now. "And then these arrows," says Bedford, showing two slides of arrows painted on the asphalt, "which is all about direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff and Robin Tunnicliff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2002
Working near the Inner Harbor has its advantages around mealtime. In addition to the restaurants and food stalls in Harborplace, there are numerous eateries for blocks in any direction. One of the more exotic options is Afghan Kabob, which opened four months ago in a sunny space at the corner of Lombard and Charles streets. The menu is small, and so is the space in this glorified carryout. But the food and service far exceed the quality of the average glorified carryout. In fact, both are better than some of the more formal places I've been to in the neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | September 11, 1996
I agree with the Oxford English Dictionary. It defines plum as a "good thing ... the pick or best of a collection of things." Savor a ripe, juicy plum and it's hard to disagree. They're a luscious balance of tart and sweet.You can add chopped, pitted plums to salads, muffins and rice. But I think plums translate best in rustic, slightly warm desserts served with ice cream or whipped cream. Cakes, pies and tarts, nothing too complicated. Desserts that let the glorious flavor of the fruit shine through are the best.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff and Robin Tunnicliff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2002
Working near the Inner Harbor has its advantages around mealtime. In addition to the restaurants and food stalls in Harborplace, there are numerous eateries for blocks in any direction. One of the more exotic options is Afghan Kabob, which opened four months ago in a sunny space at the corner of Lombard and Charles streets. The menu is small, and so is the space in this glorified carryout. But the food and service far exceed the quality of the average glorified carryout. In fact, both are better than some of the more formal places I've been to in the neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff and Robin Tunnicliff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 2002
The first thing you'll probably notice about Mimi's Cafe is the length of its menu. The ratio of food choices to seats is almost 2 to 1, 113 to 62 respectively. The list of fare can be overwhelming at first. Here are a few navigational aids to keep in mind before you throw up your hands. Mimi Abdalla, the owner, is part Greek, part Egyptian. So, it's not off base to guess that he can make food from those countries pretty well. And, because he used to manage a few Al Pacino's pizza places in town before going out on his own in 1999, he probably knows pizza, too. Both assumptions held up admirably well.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2001
The work of conceptual artist Coleslaw Baklava moves through a dizzying succession of phases, not the least significant of which was his photographic investigation of parking lots. These include close-ups of reserved parking spaces. "They're about status," says A. Clarke Bedford, artist and lecturer, pointing to a slide of an untitled piece known simply as "RESERVED 796." The numbers, you see, the notion of hierarchical structure and, well, it's probably too deeply political to go into fully right here and now. "And then these arrows," says Bedford, showing two slides of arrows painted on the asphalt, "which is all about direction.
FEATURES
By Jeannette Belliveau and By Jeannette Belliveau,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2000
Any style of cooking bound by strict rules found in the Old Testament, and molded by a people who often struggled to obtain food and spices in Poland and Russia, is likely to be highly traditional and at times austere. Yet, as that cuisine enters its fourth millennium, the winds of change are blowing strongly over Jewish cooking. And what better time to experiment with new food preparations than at Passover, the eight-day Jewish holiday that starts at sundown next Wednesday? Actually, immigrants have been adapting Jewish food to New World tastes and products ever since 1654, when the first Jewish settlers, from the Iberian Peninsula, arrived in Colonial America.
FEATURES
By Charles Perry, and Charles Perry,,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 1999
In the '60s, foodies discovered phyllo. In the '70s, they started to get a little tired of it.Understandably. They'd made pan after pan of baklava and spanakopita. They invented all sorts of flaky brie balls and cunning hors d'oeuvre cups in their quest to take phyllo to the limit.So when California cuisine exploded onto the scene in the '80s, phyllo was ungraciously ignored, like the guest who shows up at the party a couple of hours before the crowd. But foodies actually had gotten nowhere near the end of its possibilities.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | September 11, 1996
I agree with the Oxford English Dictionary. It defines plum as a "good thing ... the pick or best of a collection of things." Savor a ripe, juicy plum and it's hard to disagree. They're a luscious balance of tart and sweet.You can add chopped, pitted plums to salads, muffins and rice. But I think plums translate best in rustic, slightly warm desserts served with ice cream or whipped cream. Cakes, pies and tarts, nothing too complicated. Desserts that let the glorious flavor of the fruit shine through are the best.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 14, 1993
This rich-tasting baklava contains half the amount of sugar and a fraction of the fat you would normally use, thanks to reduced fats, sugar and nuts. The results will fool anyone.BaklavaMakes 35 pieces.1/2 pound shelled pistachio nuts, ground1 tablespoon sugar3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon1 1/2 tablespoons rose water1/2 pound phyllo dough1/2 cup low-calorie margarine, meltedrose water syrup (see below)whole cloves, optionalCombine pistachio nuts, sugar, cinnamon and rose water in small bowl.
FEATURES
By Charles Perry, and Charles Perry,,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 1999
In the '60s, foodies discovered phyllo. In the '70s, they started to get a little tired of it.Understandably. They'd made pan after pan of baklava and spanakopita. They invented all sorts of flaky brie balls and cunning hors d'oeuvre cups in their quest to take phyllo to the limit.So when California cuisine exploded onto the scene in the '80s, phyllo was ungraciously ignored, like the guest who shows up at the party a couple of hours before the crowd. But foodies actually had gotten nowhere near the end of its possibilities.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 14, 1993
This rich-tasting baklava contains half the amount of sugar and a fraction of the fat you would normally use, thanks to reduced fats, sugar and nuts. The results will fool anyone.BaklavaMakes 35 pieces.1/2 pound shelled pistachio nuts, ground1 tablespoon sugar3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon1 1/2 tablespoons rose water1/2 pound phyllo dough1/2 cup low-calorie margarine, meltedrose water syrup (see below)whole cloves, optionalCombine pistachio nuts, sugar, cinnamon and rose water in small bowl.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | November 9, 1992
Lloyd and Charlotte Grove came looking for Greek food.But when the York, Pa., couple walked through the doors of the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation in Baltimore yesterday, they found much more than baklava and gyros."
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