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Baja California

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NEWS
By Carlos Martinez and Pete Thomas and Carlos Martinez and Pete Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2006
MANZANILLO, Mexico -- Hurricane John spared Mexico's Pacific Coast tourism areas but moved northward yesterday toward the Baja California peninsula, where officials prepared to evacuate thousands of residents. John, which was downgraded yesterday to Category 2, was expected to make landfall today in Baja California before veering northwest into the Pacific. Officials at the National Hurricane Center in Miami said the storm is expected to diminish in intensity as it passes over cooler waters and should pose no threat to the California coast.
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BUSINESS
By Marla Dickerson and Marla Dickerson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 2007
PLAYAS DE ROSARITO, Mexico -- The ripples of the U.S. real estate boom began washing up on the shores of this beach town a few years ago. Californians, feeling flush from the steep run-up in housing values stateside, pulled equity from their primary homes and snapped up vacation properties in northern Baja California as if they were buying $10 lobster dinners. Ground zero was this mid-size community about 20 miles south of Tijuana, where developers sold hundreds of condominiums on spec.
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FEATURES
By Dan Coyle and Dan Coyle,Universal Press Syndicate | December 15, 1991
The first thing you have to understand about Baja California is that it's floating away. Not figuratively, either -- the 800-mile-long Mexican peninsula happens to be attached to a different tectonic plate than the rest of the North American continent, and 5 million years ago it began to drift northwest along the San Andreas Fault at the steady pace of 2 1/2 inches a year. While this bit of knowledge leaves you with a more than fair chance to catch up with Baja before it bumps into Hawaii, it also indicates the best way to vacation there: by kayak.
NEWS
By Carlos Martinez and Pete Thomas and Carlos Martinez and Pete Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 1, 2006
MANZANILLO, Mexico -- Hurricane John spared Mexico's Pacific Coast tourism areas but moved northward yesterday toward the Baja California peninsula, where officials prepared to evacuate thousands of residents. John, which was downgraded yesterday to Category 2, was expected to make landfall today in Baja California before veering northwest into the Pacific. Officials at the National Hurricane Center in Miami said the storm is expected to diminish in intensity as it passes over cooler waters and should pose no threat to the California coast.
BUSINESS
By Marla Dickerson and Marla Dickerson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 2007
PLAYAS DE ROSARITO, Mexico -- The ripples of the U.S. real estate boom began washing up on the shores of this beach town a few years ago. Californians, feeling flush from the steep run-up in housing values stateside, pulled equity from their primary homes and snapped up vacation properties in northern Baja California as if they were buying $10 lobster dinners. Ground zero was this mid-size community about 20 miles south of Tijuana, where developers sold hundreds of condominiums on spec.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 25, 1999
SAN DIEGO -- A spate of bad news involving U.S. citizens visiting Baja California in recent months has roiled passions along the international border and has some Baja officials worried about possible harm to the all-important tourism industry.It was bad enough, say tourism officials, that Mexico's federal government abruptly unveiled a fee of 150 pesos -- about $16 -- for visitors who stay more than three days or venture south of Ensenada. (Within Baja California, the fee was changed so it now applies only to visits longer than three days, regardless of the destination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Sun Staff | August 19, 2001
Eye of the Whale: Epic Passage From Baja to Siberia, by Dick Russell. Simon & Schuster. 688 pages. $35. On any mild December morning, you can sit on the veranda of the La Valencia Hotel in the San Diego suburb of La Jolla, drink cappuccino and watch white spouts erupting from the dark waters of the Pacific Ocean. These are the exhalations of California gray whales as they migrate some 5,000 miles from the Bering Sea to their winter grounds in the lagoons of Baja California. The scene is pure picture-postcard, and almost completely misleading.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | July 11, 1991
CAPE PULMO, Mexico -- Like wow.Like, I mean, like, the eclipse is coming here to Baja California. And the Green Tortoise is serving a sushi lunch to the remnants of the '60s.The Green Tortoise is a 1958 General Motors transit bus turned into a rolling dormitory for 30 survivors of the Kool-Aid-acid test.But the jargon of the era has been replaced by words such as syzygy, open star clusters, totality, Beads of Bailey.Where once "los hippies" of the Green Tortoise entered the universe through clouds of marijuana smoke, now they are here to groove on a natural thing.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 31, 1990
An eclipse of the sun on July 11 will highlight the 1991 calendar for back-yard astronomers.Unfortunately, this eclipse won't be total in Maryland.The eerie darkening of the sun as the moon passes in front of it will be total only along a narrow corridor running southeastward from the big island of Hawaii to the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California, portions of the Mexican mainland from Mazatlan to the southeast, in Costa Rica, central Colombia and...
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Contributing Writer | October 17, 1993
Baja California, Mexico -- Ididn't get to touch a whale and a sea lion didn't jump into the back of my kayak -- as happened to a fellow traveler -- but a coyote did steal my sandals, and I was visited at my campsite by a flock of pelicans fighting over a still-flopping fish.Not bad for a city girl.Here among towering dunes, mangrove stands and endless blue waters is Mexico at its most pristine. No bustling cities, no tour-group-trampled ruins, no giant resorts with pool-side mariachi shows, no souvenir stands with cheap crafts and paintings on velvet; just miles of white beaches, bountiful bird life and -- if you time your visit right -- whales, whales, whales.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 13, 2003
TIJUANA, Mexico - It may not look like much to many Americans, but Veronica Maldonato's 900-square-foot, concrete-block condo is heaven when you compare it with where she, her husband and her son had been living for the past year. If you squint across the valley at the hillside in the distance, you can see the place: villages of squatters' shacks called colonnias, their metal roofs shimmering in the relentless sun of Baja California, in the extreme northwest corner of Mexico. No electricity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Muncie and By John Muncie,Sun Staff | August 19, 2001
Eye of the Whale: Epic Passage From Baja to Siberia, by Dick Russell. Simon & Schuster. 688 pages. $35. On any mild December morning, you can sit on the veranda of the La Valencia Hotel in the San Diego suburb of La Jolla, drink cappuccino and watch white spouts erupting from the dark waters of the Pacific Ocean. These are the exhalations of California gray whales as they migrate some 5,000 miles from the Bering Sea to their winter grounds in the lagoons of Baja California. The scene is pure picture-postcard, and almost completely misleading.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 20, 2000
SAN QUINTIN, Mexico -- Braced against the sea like a protective forearm, the dune-covered peninsula corrals a bay teeming with natural wonders. In one direction, a wayward whale looses a spout of mist. In another, clouds of Pacific black brant geese streak above the surface. The shiny heads of sea lions pop above shallows electric blue in the noon sun. There's an innovative underwater farm with hundreds of thousands of oysters strung along submerged racks. But San Quintin Bay and the sheltering, seven-mile peninsula are ensnared in a battle over a proposal for a huge tourist resort: eight hotels, condominiums and other residences, three golf courses, a 350-slip marina and shopping centers.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 25, 1999
SAN DIEGO -- A spate of bad news involving U.S. citizens visiting Baja California in recent months has roiled passions along the international border and has some Baja officials worried about possible harm to the all-important tourism industry.It was bad enough, say tourism officials, that Mexico's federal government abruptly unveiled a fee of 150 pesos -- about $16 -- for visitors who stay more than three days or venture south of Ensenada. (Within Baja California, the fee was changed so it now applies only to visits longer than three days, regardless of the destination.
FEATURES
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Contributing Writer | October 17, 1993
Baja California, Mexico -- Ididn't get to touch a whale and a sea lion didn't jump into the back of my kayak -- as happened to a fellow traveler -- but a coyote did steal my sandals, and I was visited at my campsite by a flock of pelicans fighting over a still-flopping fish.Not bad for a city girl.Here among towering dunes, mangrove stands and endless blue waters is Mexico at its most pristine. No bustling cities, no tour-group-trampled ruins, no giant resorts with pool-side mariachi shows, no souvenir stands with cheap crafts and paintings on velvet; just miles of white beaches, bountiful bird life and -- if you time your visit right -- whales, whales, whales.
FEATURES
By Dan Coyle and Dan Coyle,Universal Press Syndicate | December 15, 1991
The first thing you have to understand about Baja California is that it's floating away. Not figuratively, either -- the 800-mile-long Mexican peninsula happens to be attached to a different tectonic plate than the rest of the North American continent, and 5 million years ago it began to drift northwest along the San Andreas Fault at the steady pace of 2 1/2 inches a year. While this bit of knowledge leaves you with a more than fair chance to catch up with Baja before it bumps into Hawaii, it also indicates the best way to vacation there: by kayak.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 13, 2003
TIJUANA, Mexico - It may not look like much to many Americans, but Veronica Maldonato's 900-square-foot, concrete-block condo is heaven when you compare it with where she, her husband and her son had been living for the past year. If you squint across the valley at the hillside in the distance, you can see the place: villages of squatters' shacks called colonnias, their metal roofs shimmering in the relentless sun of Baja California, in the extreme northwest corner of Mexico. No electricity.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 20, 2000
SAN QUINTIN, Mexico -- Braced against the sea like a protective forearm, the dune-covered peninsula corrals a bay teeming with natural wonders. In one direction, a wayward whale looses a spout of mist. In another, clouds of Pacific black brant geese streak above the surface. The shiny heads of sea lions pop above shallows electric blue in the noon sun. There's an innovative underwater farm with hundreds of thousands of oysters strung along submerged racks. But San Quintin Bay and the sheltering, seven-mile peninsula are ensnared in a battle over a proposal for a huge tourist resort: eight hotels, condominiums and other residences, three golf courses, a 350-slip marina and shopping centers.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | July 11, 1991
CAPE PULMO, Mexico -- Like wow.Like, I mean, like, the eclipse is coming here to Baja California. And the Green Tortoise is serving a sushi lunch to the remnants of the '60s.The Green Tortoise is a 1958 General Motors transit bus turned into a rolling dormitory for 30 survivors of the Kool-Aid-acid test.But the jargon of the era has been replaced by words such as syzygy, open star clusters, totality, Beads of Bailey.Where once "los hippies" of the Green Tortoise entered the universe through clouds of marijuana smoke, now they are here to groove on a natural thing.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 31, 1990
An eclipse of the sun on July 11 will highlight the 1991 calendar for back-yard astronomers.Unfortunately, this eclipse won't be total in Maryland.The eerie darkening of the sun as the moon passes in front of it will be total only along a narrow corridor running southeastward from the big island of Hawaii to the southern tip of Mexico's Baja California, portions of the Mexican mainland from Mazatlan to the southeast, in Costa Rica, central Colombia and...
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