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NEWS
October 24, 2012
I keep hearing about the jobs that will be created if referendum Question 7 passes, but can we be sure that the jobs will go to Marylanders? As reader Dave Daughters pointed out, there is no guarantee that will happen, yet the ads suggest it will ("How many casino jobs would go to Marylanders?" Oct. 22). I am sure the construction jobs will go to the company with the lowest bid, which could be a company from another state. Will they bring in their own people? I'm pretty sure that they will.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2014
In what on the surface seems like a remarkable turnaround, a number of conservative Republican Senate candidates this year are supporting a proposal to expand access to birth control by making it available without a prescription as an over-the-counter medication. Wider access to birth control traditionally has been a Democratic issue, so Republicans' sudden embrace of it seems almost too good to be true. Unfortunately, it is. This year four GOP Senate candidates in close races against Democratic incumbents have announced their support for over-the-counter access to birth control: Cory Gardener of Colorado; Thom Tillis of North Carolina; Ed Gillespie of Virgina and Mike McFadden of Minnesota.
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NEWS
December 17, 2013
I personally liken the Orioles involvement in Major League Baseball's winter meetings to a fishing expedition where the crew eagerly embarks on a trip to snag some trophy marlin only to pathetically return to port with a few minnows and lots of seaweed ("As winter meetings wrap up, Orioles still without a major move," Oct. 12). Being a loyal Orioles fan tests the limits of my patience. I have to infuse levity for fear of losing my seasick mind. I am without doubt that many O's fans are in the same boat.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Fishing with my nephew made me wonder - would bait worms be good to add to my garden? No! We think of earthworms as good, but some species can be very destructive. The latest non-native worm to establish itself in several states is the crazy snakeworm. Fortunately, it's not in Maryland - we don't want that nightmare here. The crazy snakeworm voraciously consumes the upper organic soil layer or mulch and turns it into grainy, dry worm-casting piles. Forest understory life is destroyed and other earthworm species disappear.
EXPLORE
By Hayward Putnam | August 4, 2011
Late summer fishing and hot weather require a different approach. This is time of the year for slowly fished live bait. My choice for ponds and stream fishing is the live grasshopper. Hooked through the collar just behind the head with the point of the hook facing rear the bait will float naturally. To fish the bait under the surface, add a small split shot about 6 inches above the bait. Let the bait slowly bounce along the bottom in the current. When the fish takes the bait give the fish time to inhale the bait fully before you set the hook.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Money's a good motivator, Anne Arundel County Sheriff Bateman said Friday. A state law that just took effect has the Comptroller's Office withholding Maryland tax refunds of residents of Anne Arundel County or people who have an outstanding warrant in the county. In the first week, 110 letters were mailed, and 10 people turned themselves in or otherwise cleared up their warrant situation, the sheriff said. "It's easy fishing,” said Bateman,  who had approached Comptroller Peter Franchot with the idea.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 27, 2010
There was a time when I could easily lure my three young children in from their summer-night street games with the bait of the Discovery Channel's "Shark Week. " We would all gather on the family room couch to watch the frighteningly close-up, spectacular shots of feeding frenzies — fins and teeth chopping the water into a Bass-o-matic froth filmed by a brave diver in an underwater cage. A narrator — with all the inflection and dynamism of Dick Cheney — would relate key facts about the class Chondrichthyes as well as salient environmental and habitat issues.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 13, 2005
FOR AS LONG as sportsmen and women have been trying to gain an edge over critters, there have been companies peddling the next gimmick to give humans supremacy over members of the animal kingdom. As a member of Homo sapiens with a college degree who owns two rather large house cats with an agenda, I can only repeat the immortal words of Aerosmith: "Dream on." Yet, every season battery-powered gizmos and genetically jiggered bait flood the market. The latest must-have in our market is the "Black Salty," a live bait so powerful, we're told, that the whale would spit up Jonah to make room.
SPORTS
May 13, 1994
The live aquatic bait ban in effect at Baltimore City's three reservoirs will be modified to allow the use of state-certified, zebra mussel-free bait, Mayor Kurt. L. Schmoke announced yesterday.Live bait had been banned to protect the reservoirs from accidental introduction of zebra mussels, which can attach to live bait. The inch-long shellfish multiplies rapidly and has clogged large water intake structures.Now if you use live aquatic bait, you must have a receipt from a state-certified bait shop in your possession, dated no more than 48 hours from purchase.
FEATURES
By Matt Weitz and Matt Weitz,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | September 15, 2000
"Bait" tries hard to be two movies, a comedy and a thriller. With the former it does a good job, thanks to the efforts of leading man Jamie Foxx, but pretty much fails at the latter. Foxx is a petty thief named Alvin Sanders. Picked up one night for burglary, he shares a cell with John Jaster (Robert Pastorelli), whose heart problems frighten him into giving Foxx some cryptic hints as to the whereabouts of a load of stolen gold. Foxx is eager to recover it. So are the feds, and they effect a jail-yard injury that enables them to install a high-tech tracking and listening device inside Foxx's jaw, then turn him loose.
SPORTS
By Nate Rabner, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Jeff Lewatowski trudged upstream, the chilly, knee-deep Gunpowder River flowing around his waterproof overalls. Following the inside curve of a bend, he picked a likely looking spot and settled in, much like the trout he planned to catch. "They want to take advantage of the bugs," said Lewatowski, 39, who lives in Havre de Grace and guides fishing trips around the state. "They get very excitable the more bugs there are on the water. … They compete in a spot in the creek to sit. " May through June is sulphur mayfly season, with thousands of mayfly nymphs swimming up from sunken logs and rocks to molt and flutter away for their brief adult lives.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 5, 2014
Did you ever wonder if a restaurant's crabcake was made with Maryland crab or some foreign import? Or if that was really red snapper you bought, or an impostor?  A bill introduced Wednesday in Annapolis would make it illegal for restaurants or markets to mislabel the seafood they sell, and moreover would require them to specify where their crabmeat came from. "If I go to a restaurant and order a 'Maryland-style' crabcake, I'd like to know if it's made with Venezuelan crabmeat," said Del. Eric G. Luedtke , the bill's sponsor.
NEWS
December 17, 2013
I personally liken the Orioles involvement in Major League Baseball's winter meetings to a fishing expedition where the crew eagerly embarks on a trip to snag some trophy marlin only to pathetically return to port with a few minnows and lots of seaweed ("As winter meetings wrap up, Orioles still without a major move," Oct. 12). Being a loyal Orioles fan tests the limits of my patience. I have to infuse levity for fear of losing my seasick mind. I am without doubt that many O's fans are in the same boat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | November 17, 2013
Well, if you were one of those "The Walking Dead" fans who was wondering what was going on with the Governor, then Sunday night's episode - "Live Bait" - was just what you were waiting for! This was one of those episodes that really focused on one character for the entire 60 minutes, and I'm OK with that. In fact, I think this was one of the strongest episodes of the season, if not the series. The episode picks up with the Governor and his two loyal cronies departing the crime scene where he shot up a lot of faceless Woodburians.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
A recent commentator speculated about whether Smith Island can be rescued from oblivion ("Smith Island can be saved," July 7). I ask, why bother? For the 50 years I've lived in Maryland, I've heard Smith Island this, Smith Island that. I really believed there was something to Smith Island. Boy, was I wrong! During a recent environmental professional institute, I visited Tylerton, one of the communities on the group of islands that constitute Smith Island. With all due respect to the lovely folks with whom I interacted, why any tax dollars would be spent saving a swamp with 50 or so residents is beyond me. Approximately half the homes are shacks, boarded up and seemingly abandoned.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Ocean City has sharks. That's hardly news. I mean, it has water, right? So it makes sense there would be some sharks - maybe not a great white, although there have been reports by OCEARCH of a great white named 'Mary Lee' that was tracked off the coast of Maryland earlier this year. And the town has an annual Shark Tournament, where fishermen reel them in by the pound. There's also the restaurant Shark on the Harbor, and of course, that fake shark wedged into Ripley's Museum.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
Abandoned crab pots can be a serious issue in the Chesapeake Bay. As long as there is bait in them they will continue to catch crabs. A dead crab in an abandoned pot becomes bait. But a recent article in The Sun refers to crab pots and crab traps interchangeably, and they are not the same thing ("Building a better crab trap," May 30). Traps are used primarily by recreational crabbers. It is a square trap made of wire such as chicken wire with bait such as salted eel tied inside. When it lands on the bottom the four sides are open.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Could "The Bachelorette" go for a Bawlamer boy? Could be... When the ABC show has its season premiere Monday, May 27, one of the contenders for the hand of bachelorette Desiree Hartsock will be introduced as Brian, a 29-year-old financial adviser from Baltimore. Brian is, in fact, Brian Jarosinski, a financial services representative for Gateway Capital Financial, an office of MetLife (although the website misspells Brian's name as "Jaronsinski," it's him). According to his bio on ABC.com, Jarosinski was born in Olney; is 6'-2", wears size 13 shoes and has no tattoos; lists his three favorite movies as "The Rock," "'The Notebook" and "The Count of Monte Cristo"; and professes to be "very neat.
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