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NEWS
May 17, 1994
Talk about a quick exit! The day before he was set to formally announce his entry into this year's race for governor, former Democratic state Sen. Stewart Bainum Jr. shocked his supporters on Sunday by deciding he didn't really want the job.Mr. Bainum would have been a major contender in the crowded && Democratic gubernatorial field. He had committed about $1 million to finance a fully staffed operation and a month-long media blitz. His family's ownership of the Manor Care nursing home and motel corporation assured him of all the campaign money he needed.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2002
A year after announcing a project to renovate or demolish 5,000 abandoned houses, Baltimore officials acknowledge that they need more help and are spending $1 million to hire 21 temporary employees. The new workers -- three lawyers and the rest paralegals, clerks and real estate agents -- will allow Mayor Martin O'Malley's "Project 5000" to start working at full speed, said Michael Bainum, director of the program. The goal is to breathe new life into about a third of the approximately 14,000 abandoned properties in the city.
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NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | January 27, 1994
DEMOCRACY in action doesn't come cheap, and to prove it Stewart Bainum Jr. is considering spending $3 million of his own money.Mr. Bainum, a Democrat, wants to be governor. And in a year when campaign money is scarce because of the absence in both parties of sure-bet front-runners, Mr. Bainum's personal wealth could make the difference. He could become the Big Foot candidate everybody's been waiting for.The word humming along the fiber optic is that Mr. Bainum, former senator and delegate from Montgomery County, is calling in old chits as he begins assembling the pieces of another campaign.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2000
Manor Care Inc., whose shares have slid along with other nursing home stocks in the past few months, was the target of competing takeover bids yesterday, causing the shares to jump 28.5 percent. Manor Care closed the day at $12.6875, up $2.8125. Trading volume was 3.2 million shares, about six times the daily average the past six months. Stewart Bainum Jr., the Maryland businessman who is chairman of Ohio-based Manor Care, said yesterday that he would buy the company at a price "significantly in excess" of the current stock valuation.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
Thanks to Ross Perot, Watergate and a mind-numbing array of home-grown corruption scandals, the world of politics has become user friendly for rich men with big ambitions like Stewart Bainum Jr.Mr. Bainum, a 47-year-old millionaire Democratic businessman from Montgomery County, is poised to enter the race for governor.Though he has not held public office since 1987, he has sufficient political standing to make a credible, perhaps even winning run for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and Robert Timberg and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writers | May 17, 1994
CHEVY CHASE -- Millionaire businessman Stewart Bainum Jr. said yesterday that nagging concerns about time with his family and the effect on his company were the reasons for his last-minute decision to abort his Democratic bid for governor Sunday night, the eve of his scheduled announcement."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1994
Wealthy Montgomery County businessman Stewart Bainum Jr., who had spent more than $500,000 preparing television ads to launch a belated candidacy for Maryland governor, announced last night he was abruptly changing his mind and would not enter the already-crowded race.As late as Friday, Mr. Bainum's campaign showed reporters polished television spots that were expected to win him credibility quickly.Today, Mr. Bainum, 48, a Democrat and former state legislator, ++ had been expected to announced his candidacy at events planned across the state.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1996
The Montgomery County businessman who will be host of a critique tonight of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's performance said yesterday he has no goals beyond protecting the welfare of Maryland and the strength of its Democratic Party."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening stepped up his attack on administration critics yesterday, saying that some business leaders who are expected to meet this week to discuss a 1998 challenge to him are angry because he refuses to support their pet projects.In an interview, Glendening lashed out at H. Furlong Baldwin, chairman and chief executive officer of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.; Calman "Buddy" Zamoiski, a Baltimore businessman and president of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; and Stewart Bainum Jr., chief operating officer of Manor Care Inc., a nursing home and hotel company.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A Chevy Chase millionaire and former Maryland state senator has paid the government $4,000 in fines for violating campaign laws, the Federal Election Commission said.Stewart Bainum Jr. exceeded caps on campaign giving in 1992 and 1993 by funneling $4,000 in contributions to federal candidates through his son, Bradford, according to the FEC conciliation agreement made public Monday.The contributions were made before Bradford had turned 2 years old.Bainum is chief executive of Manor Care Inc., a national nursing-home chain.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1997
Moving to regain majority control of Vitalink Pharmacy Services, Manor Care announced yesterday that it would buy up to 1.5 million shares of the institutional pharmacy company at $20 a share.Manor Care, a Gaithersburg company that operates nursing facilities and assisted living complexes, owned 82 percent of Vitalink until February. Vitalink issued 11.7 million shares of stock to buy the TeamCare pharmacy division of GranCare Inc. of Atlanta, another long-term care company. The deal was valued at $388 million, including the assumption of $107 million in debt.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A Chevy Chase millionaire and former Maryland state senator has paid the government $4,000 in fines for violating campaign laws, the Federal Election Commission said.Stewart Bainum Jr. exceeded caps on campaign giving in 1992 and 1993 by funneling $4,000 in contributions to federal candidates through his son, Bradford, according to the FEC conciliation agreement made public Monday.The contributions were made before Bradford had turned 2 years old.Bainum is chief executive of Manor Care Inc., a national nursing-home chain.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1996
The Montgomery County businessman who will be host of a critique tonight of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's performance said yesterday he has no goals beyond protecting the welfare of Maryland and the strength of its Democratic Party."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening stepped up his attack on administration critics yesterday, saying that some business leaders who are expected to meet this week to discuss a 1998 challenge to him are angry because he refuses to support their pet projects.In an interview, Glendening criticized H. Furlong Baldwin, chairman and chief executive officer of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.; Calman "Buddy" Zamoiski, a Baltimore businessman and president of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; and Stewart Bainum Jr., chief operating officer of Manor Care Inc., a nursing home and hotel company.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening stepped up his attack on administration critics yesterday, saying that some business leaders who are expected to meet this week to discuss a 1998 challenge to him are angry because he refuses to support their pet projects.In an interview, Glendening lashed out at H. Furlong Baldwin, chairman and chief executive officer of Mercantile Bankshares Corp.; Calman "Buddy" Zamoiski, a Baltimore businessman and president of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; and Stewart Bainum Jr., chief operating officer of Manor Care Inc., a nursing home and hotel company.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening lashed out yesterday at "gubernatorial wannabes" and powerful forces who push private interests above those of the state.His remarks were aimed at businessmen and elected officials who are expected to meet Thursday night at the home of nursing home magnate Stewart Bainum Jr. in Montgomery County to discuss a challenge to the first-term governor in 1998.Their meeting comes at a time when the governor, buffeted by low poll ratings and a controversial fund-raising expedition to New York, had returned from what he thought was a unifying Democratic National Convention in Chicago.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Mark Hyman contributed to this article | February 3, 1994
Gov. William Donald Schaefer's come-hither glances have already helped lure two candidates -- Republican Helen Delich Bentley and Democrat American Joe Miedusiewski -- into the gubernatorial race.Now he's whispering to a third prospective political heir, millionaire Montgomery County businessman Stuart Bainum Jr., who hasn't said yes yet but has seemingly edged closer to taking the plunge.Coyness may not be in Mr. Bainum's best interest. The governor, sources say, has begun a new, exceedingly discreet flirtation.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | May 29, 1994
With nearly four months to go before the September primary, Prince George's County Executive Parris N. Glendening is now widelyregarded as the candidate to beat or the Democratic nomination for governor.Anything can happen over the course of a summer-long campaign, but at the moment, the 51-year-old former college professor appears to have positioned himself to break away from the crowded Democratic field.In interviews with state legislators, party activists, political contributors, pollsters and even supporters of rival candidates, Mr. Glendening is portrayed as the candidate with the money, the organization and the endorsements.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and Robert Timberg and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writers | May 17, 1994
CHEVY CHASE -- Millionaire businessman Stewart Bainum Jr. said yesterday that nagging concerns about time with his family and the effect on his company were the reasons for his last-minute decision to abort his Democratic bid for governor Sunday night, the eve of his scheduled announcement."
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