Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaidoa
IN THE NEWS

Baidoa

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- Five months ago this was a town full of skeletons, the staggering ambulatory kind, and the supine and torpid, the light of life visibly disappearing from their eyes. The living population was losing ground to the recent dead.Most of the infants were dying off; the adults fell down dead in the road and were buried in shallow graves on the margin.There seemed to be no end to it. Baidoa swelled from a town of 7,000 into a crowded camp of some 30,000 wretched souls. And day by day more and more of the desperate starving stumbled in from the surrounding scrubland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 2006
ZANZIBAR, Tanzania -- Islamist forces in Somalia expanded their offensive yesterday, witnesses said, and began attacking the seat of the transitional government from a new direction. According to residents in the Bakal area north of Baidoa, the inland city where the transitional government is based, Islamist forces rushed in with several dozen pickup trucks bristling with heavy guns. Before this, their attacks had been limited to the south and the east of Baidoa, where they met stiff resistance and suffered many casualties.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 11, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- Gunmen, some of them flushed fro Mogadishu by the arrival of American troops, have terrorized this town at the epicenter of the Somali famine in the past few days, killing, looting, and preventing relief agencies from feeding the hungry.Local people, more afraid than usual, said food was of secondary importance. They wanted the guns confiscated."I'm very nervous," Adan Ahmed Isaak, a field officer for the Somali Red Crescent Society, said yesterday. "The Americans made a big mistake by coming only to Mogadishu instead of coming to the whole country.
NEWS
By ABUKAR ALBADRI AND ROBYN DIXON and ABUKAR ALBADRI AND ROBYN DIXON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2006
JAWHAR, Somalia -- Islamist militias tightened their hold on southern Somalia yesterday by seizing control of a major strategic town, ousting a group of secular warlords in a brief, decisive battle just a week after driving them from the capital city of Mogadishu. The nation's transitional government, based in Baidoa, asked the African Union to deploy peacekeeping troops. The AU supports the transitional government but has not approved the deployment. The Islamic militants of the Islamic Courts Union have strongly opposed the presence of foreign troops in the country and threatened to halt talks with the transitional government if they sought AU help.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 15, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- Twenty-three months after government troops sacked this town in their desperate quest to crush a tribal rebellion, the ravages of starvation can be seen everywhere.In the eyes of the little girl in black rags who stood on a street corner yesterday, holding out an empty bowl.In the silent rows of women and children, nomads who trekked in from the bush and now slump along the bomb-cracked earthen roads, some no more than stick figures, others with distended stomachs.And at the Alamin compound, where 600 youngsters left orphaned by former President Mohamed Siad Barre's butchery listlessly studied the Koran, scarcely noticing U.S. fighter-jets buzzing in sorties above.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 2006
ZANZIBAR, Tanzania -- Islamist forces in Somalia expanded their offensive yesterday, witnesses said, and began attacking the seat of the transitional government from a new direction. According to residents in the Bakal area north of Baidoa, the inland city where the transitional government is based, Islamist forces rushed in with several dozen pickup trucks bristling with heavy guns. Before this, their attacks had been limited to the south and the east of Baidoa, where they met stiff resistance and suffered many casualties.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | December 8, 1992
Catholic Relief Service workers just returned to their Baltimore headquarters from Somalia said yesterday they believe the presence of U.S. troops will effectively inhibit the armed bands that have blocked distribution of humanitarian aid to starving thousands of Somalis."
NEWS
By Jane Perlez and Jane Perlez,New York Times News Service | August 16, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- The famine in Somalia could have been mitigated if the United Nations had dispatched relief experts months ago instead of relying on a small crew of junior staff members in the country, a senior U.N. official has said."
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Staff Writer Richard O'Mara, Sun staff writer in Mogadishu, and Peter Honey of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | December 13, 1992
BARDERA, Somalia -- The U.S. military decision to secur Mogadishu before troops occupy outposts in the hinterlands of starvation has made life more dangerous for people trying to feed dying Somalis.Marauding gunmen fleeing the capital, where U.S. Marines landed Wednesday, are running amok across the countryside and even in refugee camps in neighboring Kenya, putting the safety of Western relief workers and innocent Somalis at risk.In Bardera, relief workers are concerned that the next stage of the operation, taking control of Baidoa, will make matters worse for them here.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 8, 1992
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- A year ago, 5-year-old Mohammed Abukar lay on his back in a decrepit hospital yard, his right leg newly amputated after a shell blast in the war that killed his family.With only his grandmother to look after him and a famine looming, the prospects of survival were dim for the bright, brown-eyed boy with an engaging smile.Last year, he lay outdoors in the heat, swatting flies with a piece of cardboard. Yesterday, on the anniversary of his operation, a smiling Mohammed loped around with his friends, helped by a steel crutch clamped to his arm.But children Mohammed's age and younger are rare in Somalia today.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | August 20, 1994
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- As a $3 billion humanitarian mission winds down, Somalia is sliding into anarchy again. Looters descend unchecked over relief shipments. Armed teen-agers hijack food convoys. Aid workers move in armed trucks to avoid being kidnapped.In short, the country appears to be caught up in the same spiral that earlier led to starvation, media attention and, ultimately, the intervention of 24,000 U.S. troops.This time, few seem to care.Relief agencies are leaving and, in some cases, diverting resources to Rwanda.
NEWS
By JOSEPH G. BOCK | September 10, 1993
It was a hot, windy August day when I visited a Somali village named Baagay, a site where Catholic Relief Services is distributing food and agriculture tools to hundreds of people who have survived the worst of their country's violence and famine. I stood there with dirt in my eyes, mouth and nose, trying to get some sense of how these people could live through such civil strife and destitution.Then a beautiful woman, wearing brilliantly colored African garb, penetrated through the dust and pointed at a leg sore, over an inch in diameter, which had puffed her entire foot with infection.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | August 28, 1993
There are no more half-dead skeletons wandering the streets of Baidoa, in Somalia; the green sorghum stands 8-feet-high in the countryside where a year ago there was nothing but dust.As reports of a deteriorating security situation for allied troops continue to come out of the country, the Rev. William P. Joy, acting head of the Catholic Relief Service, has brought back evidence that the primary purpose of the United Nations expedition to Somalia at least has been served, evidence that the great famine is over and communal life in some regions outside Mogadishu is returning to normal.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | December 20, 1992
Ahmad Robeleh and his wife, Khatra, watch the television coverage of Operation Restore Hope differently from most of their neighbors in Towson.They are horrified by the pictures of starving Somalis. They also hope to see relatives alive, yet they are fearful of seeing them among the victims.The Robelehs, like other Somalis interviewed last week, are appalled at events in their ravaged East African homeland. They are grateful to the United States for undertaking Operation Restore Hope.Almost all have relatives still in Somalia.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- Five months ago this was a town full of skeletons, the staggering ambulatory kind, and the supine and torpid, the light of life visibly disappearing from their eyes. The living population was losing ground to the recent dead.Most of the infants were dying off; the adults fell down dead in the road and were buried in shallow graves on the margin.There seemed to be no end to it. Baidoa swelled from a town of 7,000 into a crowded camp of some 30,000 wretched souls. And day by day more and more of the desperate starving stumbled in from the surrounding scrubland.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 15, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- Twenty-three months after government troops sacked this town in their desperate quest to crush a tribal rebellion, the ravages of starvation can be seen everywhere.In the eyes of the little girl in black rags who stood on a street corner yesterday, holding out an empty bowl.In the silent rows of women and children, nomads who trekked in from the bush and now slump along the bomb-cracked earthen roads, some no more than stick figures, others with distended stomachs.And at the Alamin compound, where 600 youngsters left orphaned by former President Mohamed Siad Barre's butchery listlessly studied the Koran, scarcely noticing U.S. fighter-jets buzzing in sorties above.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Staff Writer | August 28, 1993
There are no more half-dead skeletons wandering the streets of Baidoa, in Somalia; the green sorghum stands 8-feet-high in the countryside where a year ago there was nothing but dust.As reports of a deteriorating security situation for allied troops continue to come out of the country, the Rev. William P. Joy, acting head of the Catholic Relief Service, has brought back evidence that the primary purpose of the United Nations expedition to Somalia at least has been served, evidence that the great famine is over and communal life in some regions outside Mogadishu is returning to normal.
NEWS
By ABUKAR ALBADRI AND ROBYN DIXON and ABUKAR ALBADRI AND ROBYN DIXON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 15, 2006
JAWHAR, Somalia -- Islamist militias tightened their hold on southern Somalia yesterday by seizing control of a major strategic town, ousting a group of secular warlords in a brief, decisive battle just a week after driving them from the capital city of Mogadishu. The nation's transitional government, based in Baidoa, asked the African Union to deploy peacekeeping troops. The AU supports the transitional government but has not approved the deployment. The Islamic militants of the Islamic Courts Union have strongly opposed the presence of foreign troops in the country and threatened to halt talks with the transitional government if they sought AU help.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Staff Writer Richard O'Mara, Sun staff writer in Mogadishu, and Peter Honey of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | December 13, 1992
BARDERA, Somalia -- The U.S. military decision to secur Mogadishu before troops occupy outposts in the hinterlands of starvation has made life more dangerous for people trying to feed dying Somalis.Marauding gunmen fleeing the capital, where U.S. Marines landed Wednesday, are running amok across the countryside and even in refugee camps in neighboring Kenya, putting the safety of Western relief workers and innocent Somalis at risk.In Bardera, relief workers are concerned that the next stage of the operation, taking control of Baidoa, will make matters worse for them here.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 11, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- Gunmen, some of them flushed fro Mogadishu by the arrival of American troops, have terrorized this town at the epicenter of the Somali famine in the past few days, killing, looting, and preventing relief agencies from feeding the hungry.Local people, more afraid than usual, said food was of secondary importance. They wanted the guns confiscated."I'm very nervous," Adan Ahmed Isaak, a field officer for the Somali Red Crescent Society, said yesterday. "The Americans made a big mistake by coming only to Mogadishu instead of coming to the whole country.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.