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NEWS
August 11, 2014
Just when it seemed the situation in Iraq couldn't get any worse, the government moved a step closer to collapsing into chaos on Sunday when its president, Fuad Masum, formally nominated a candidate to replace the country's authoritarian prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, in an effort to break the political paralysis gripping the country since parliamentary elections in April. From there, things went straight downhill. President Masum named Haider Abadi, a member of Mr. Maliki's own Shiite Islamist Dawa Party, as the next prime minister, urging him to forge a broad coalition government to unify the country against Sunni extremists who have taken over large swaths of Iraq in recent weeks and are threatening to march on the capital.
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NEWS
August 11, 2014
Just when it seemed the situation in Iraq couldn't get any worse, the government moved a step closer to collapsing into chaos on Sunday when its president, Fuad Masum, formally nominated a candidate to replace the country's authoritarian prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, in an effort to break the political paralysis gripping the country since parliamentary elections in April. From there, things went straight downhill. President Masum named Haider Abadi, a member of Mr. Maliki's own Shiite Islamist Dawa Party, as the next prime minister, urging him to forge a broad coalition government to unify the country against Sunni extremists who have taken over large swaths of Iraq in recent weeks and are threatening to march on the capital.
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NEWS
April 10, 2003
THE RESISTANCE and sullenness that greeted American troops in southern Iraq led many - in uniform and out - to suspect that Baghdad was going to be a hard nut to crack. But events are proving otherwise. Fighting continues even as looters celebrate the evaporation of Saddam Hussein's regime, but despite the gunfire U.S. forces are gaining almost complete freedom of movement around the city. The Army has borrowed a page from that famous baseball team in New York: Once their opponents offer them an opening, the Yanks just pour it on. In Baghdad, this has led to a swift and unexpected transformation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | May 17, 2012
Max Payne is back. Trading his badge for what appears to be a cushy gig in Brazil guarding socialites, our titular character seems to spends much of the game working on a pretty steady cocktail of booze and pills. In between the drunken hazes and flashbacks rests a gritty third-person shooter that tells a story unlike almost any other game out there. “Max Payne 3” is cinematic in the best ways possible, never wasting the player's time with a cutscene that doesn't mean something or keep the action moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | May 17, 2012
Max Payne is back. Trading his badge for what appears to be a cushy gig in Brazil guarding socialites, our titular character seems to spends much of the game working on a pretty steady cocktail of booze and pills. In between the drunken hazes and flashbacks rests a gritty third-person shooter that tells a story unlike almost any other game out there. “Max Payne 3” is cinematic in the best ways possible, never wasting the player's time with a cutscene that doesn't mean something or keep the action moving.
NEWS
August 17, 2003
SOME NEW YORKERS made a party of it after the power failed Thursday night, eating and drinking by candlelight and camping out on the sidewalks. Many seemed exceptionally pleased with themselves and with their sense of resilience -- though, not to take anything away from them, there also seemed to be a general sense that one day of this, in 90-plus temperatures, was quite enough. Any more, and they might have cracked. Last week it was 114 degrees in the capital of Iraq, and 120 degrees down toward Basra.
NEWS
November 30, 2003
"IT WAS AN EMOTIONAL moment to walk in that room; the energy level was beyond belief. I've been in front of some excited crowds before, but this ... the place truly erupted and I could see the, first, look of amazement, and then look of appreciation on the kids' faces." By his own account, that moment of connection put to rest any last doubts of the commander in chief that his lightning-fast trip halfway around the world to visit U.S. troops in Baghdad on Thanksgiving was the right thing to do. What a morale booster!
NEWS
May 27, 2004
THE PENTAGON has confirmed that traces of the nerve agent sarin were detected in an Iraqi artillery shell that was found and detonated in Baghdad on May 15. To suggest that this discovery proves the Bush administration was right to go to war against Saddam Hussein is close to ludicrous. Yet it would be equally foolhardy simply to dismiss this find. Chemical weapons are serious business -- and where there was one shell, there may be more. Some background: No one disputes that Iraq produced nerve agents, and used them, during the 1980s.
NEWS
March 22, 2006
President Bush was going on again yesterday about success in Iraq; three years into the war, it is, no doubt, a little unrealistic to expect him to suddenly start coming to terms with reality. Polls suggest that most Americans have learned to tune him out, which may be a healthy reaction for the individual but doesn't bode well for the nation. For three years, the president has talked about progress, and yet the future of Iraq looks darker now than ever before. And it's not just Iraq; it seems the obliviousness is spreading.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Waves of killing engulfed the capital and surrounding areas yesterday as bombings, shootings and sectarian executions left more than 100 Iraqis dead. The death toll, high even by Baghdad standards, included 20 killed by two synchronized car bombs in east Baghdad, and 64 men whose mutilated bodies were found on roadsides, empty lots and drainage ditches in and around the capital. The U.S. military also reported yesterday that seven U.S. military personnel had died in combat Sunday, boosting to at least 58 the number of troops killed during the first 15 days of the month - a rate higher than any time since January 2005, when U.S. forces battled insurgents before the country's elections.
NEWS
By Adil E. Shamoo | February 16, 2012
Two recent reports appearing on the same day last week in The New York Times and The Washington Post illustrate U.S. intentions in Iraq. What they reveal is that despite the heralded "end" of U.S. participation in the war there, U.S. policy continues to depend on our security apparatus to influence Iraq, at the expense of Iraqis' sovereignty and dignity. The Times report informed us that the U.S. State Departmentdecided to cut the U.S. embassy staff by 50 percent from its current 16,000 personnel.
NEWS
By Adil E. Shamoo and Bonnie Bricker | October 25, 2011
"After nearly nine years, America's war in Iraq will be over. " With his Oct. 21 statement on our withdrawal of troops from Iraq by year-end, President Barack Obama is keeping his promise to the American people for complete withdrawal of U.S. troops and satisfying the Status of Forces Agreement with the Iraqi government. Mr. Obama declared that the U.S. and Iraq would have a "relationship between sovereign states, an equal partnership based on mutual interests and mutual respect.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2010
When Donald Albert and Stephen Decato came to Baltimore from rural New Hampshire to sample the urban noise environment for the Army, they had two worries. How dangerous would it be to work on streets they'd seen portrayed in bloody HBO crime dramas? And what kind of suspicion might they arouse as they deployed their black attache cases and weird electronic equipment in a city that was reliving a nightmare during the trial of Washington-area sniper John Allen Mohammad?
NEWS
By Robert Little | robert.little@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley called a press conference from an unexpected location Friday: Baghdad, Iraq, where he arrived on an early morning flight as part of a Pentagon-sponsored tour. In a conference call with reporters, the governor said he spent the day meeting and dining with troops and gaining insight into the war-zone lifestyle that should be useful in his role as leader of 6,300 troops of the Maryland National Guard. "The reason I'm here is because it's important to the Department of Defense and it's important to our country that our governors stay engaged, given the number of National Guard troops" who are deployed to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Ned Parker, Raheem Salman and Usama Redha and Ned Parker, Raheem Salman and Usama Redha , Tribune Newspapers | December 9, 2009
BAGHDAD - - As Iraqi officials prepared to announce a new date for long-delayed national elections, car bombs detonated at government buildings and in crowded Baghdad streets Tuesday, killing at least 127 people and wounding about 500 more. The attacks on state institutions appeared aimed at further eroding the Iraqi people's faith in the political process, which many already viewed with deep skepticism. The morning blasts shook the eastern and western sides of the city over a span of about 30 minutes, gutting parts of the city's main courthouse on the western side of the Tigris River and other buildings.
NEWS
July 1, 2009
Car bomb kills at least 27 in crowded Iraq market BAGHDAD - A car bomb exploded in a crowded outdoor market in the northern city of Kirkuk on Tuesday, killing at least 27 people, police said, a deadly reminder of the challenges facing the Iraqi government even as it celebrated the withdrawal of U.S. combat troops from cities. The bombing marred what had otherwise been a festive day as Iraqis commemorated the newly declared National Sovereignty Day. It also came hours after four U.S. soldiers were killed in combat Monday in Baghdad.
NEWS
By LOUISE ROUG and LOUISE ROUG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2006
BAGHDAD -- The Iraqi government imposed a two-day vehicle ban in the capital yesterday, an effort to avoid bloodshed during a major Shiite festival this weekend. During the festival last year, pilgrims crossing a bridge over the Tigris River panicked after rumors spread that a suicide bomber was among them. About 1,000 people - many of them women and children - drowned or were trampled to death in what remains the bloodiest day since the American-led invasion. This year, authorities estimate that more than 1 million people will attend the festival, which marks the death in 799 of Imam Musa Kadhim, one of 12 major Shiite saints.
NEWS
November 21, 2006
Army doctors have been administering to badly wounded soldiers a powerful drug that they believe saves lives, because it stops bleeding. Yet the after-effects may include unexpected clots, which when they break free days or even weeks later can end up killing some of those same soldiers. Reporter Robert Little's three-part series in The Sun, which concludes today, raises two crucial questions about the drug, Recombinant Activated Factor VII: What's its benefit in terms of lives saved? And what's the cost, in later strokes and heart attacks?
NEWS
By Saif Hameed and Ned Parker and Saif Hameed and Ned Parker,Tribune Newspapers | June 25, 2009
BAGHDAD - -A bomb in a sprawling Shiite Muslim neighborhood killed at least 72 people and wounded more than 135 Wednesday, highlighting the danger that Iraq could slip into unrestrained violence after U.S. combat troops leave its cities - and with the deadline less than a week away. It was unclear who was responsible for detonating the bomb, which was hidden in a motorcycle with a vegetable cart. Some blamed Sunni insurgents from al-Qaida in Iraq or remnants of former dictator Saddam Hussein's Baath Party, but others suggested that the bombing was the result of disputes among Shiite factions.
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