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By JEF DAUBER/STAFF GRAPHIC | June 15, 1993
THE LIBERALSJustice Harry A. BlackmunAge: 84Appointed by Richard Nixon, 1970.Began as moderate, steadily more liberal. Wrotefirst abortion ruling, in 1973.Likely to retire next year.Justice John Paul StevensAge: 73Appointed by Gerald Ford, 1975.Independent, sometimes maverick, mostly liberal.Justice David H. SouterAge: 53Appointed by George Bush, 1990.Began as conservative, now the most liberal of centrists.Main intellectual rival to Justice Scalia.Justice nominee Ruth Bader GinsburgAge: 60Just nominated by Bill Clinton.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 2, 2012
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburglikes the Indian Healthcare Improvement Act and other ingredients of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, aka "Obamacare. " Why, she asked toward the end of three days of hearings, shouldn't the court keep the good stuff in Obamacare and just dump the unconstitutional bits? The court, she explained, is presented with "a choice between a wrecking operation ... or a salvage job. And the more conservative approach would be salvage rather than throwing out everything.
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NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | January 19, 1994
Chicago.--The year 1992 was billed as the Year of the Woman. But 1993 was just as good a year for women, and there is no reason to think 1994 will not be the same. Every year for some time to come will be a Year of the Woman. The floodgates have been opened. Talents long suppressed or contained or narrowly channeled are freed to receive deserved recognition.Hillary Rodham Clinton is one symbol of this -- yet we make a mistake if we think of her as exceptional in her professional background.
NEWS
By Geneva Overholser | August 21, 2001
WASHINGTON - Let us now praise famous women, especially those with the grace and wisdom to champion other women - with resulting benefit for all people. A lovely example has arisen with the publication of the memoir of Malvina Harlan. Not that Malvina was famous. She was not - although she hosted Washington society weekly, by the hundreds. That was because her husband was Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan. What Malvina Shanklin Harlan did was to write a compelling memoir about the Harlans' life and times - remarkable times, encompassing slavery, the Civil War and its aftermath.
NEWS
August 10, 1993
Ruth Bader Ginsburg begins her career as a Supreme Court justice today. She was confirmed by the Senate by a vote of 96-3 only three working days after the Senate Judiciary Committee recommended her confirmation unanimously. Quite a contrast from the last go-round. In 1991, the committee recommended against confirmation of Judge Clarence Thomas, and the full Senate confirmed by only a 52-48 vote.Judge Thomas was criticized for a lot of things in his hearings, including non-responsiveness to questions about his legal philosophy.
NEWS
February 26, 1995
Is this the shape of things to come?: "BREYER, J., delivered the opinion of the Court, in which STEVENS, O'CONNOR, KENNEDY, SOUTER, and GINSBURG, JJ., joined. THOMAS, J., filed a dissenting opinion, in which REHNQUIST, C. J., and SCALIA, J., joined."That's the language at the end of a Supreme Court opinion issued last week in which six moderate to liberal justices out-voted three conservatives in a habeas corpus case. In so doing they seem to have changed the law in this area -- at least slightly and maybe more so. They definitely changed the tone of the constitutional argument on this issue, putting fairness above finality in the habeas debate.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | August 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- It was supposed to be a perfect day at the White House -- and it nearly was.The sun shone, audiences at the White House clapped appreciatively and President Clinton basked -- twice -- in the Marine band's renditions of "Hail to the Chief," first as he signed his hallmark economic bill and then again when he marched into the East Room for the swearing-in of new Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg."
NEWS
By Mona Charen | June 17, 1993
IT IS far, far worse to be President Bill Clinton's friend than to be his enemy.Ask Zoe Baird, or Kimba Wood, or Lani Guinier, or Bruce Babbitt, or Stephen Breyer, or, alternatively, Bob Dole. Of that list, only Senator Dole is looking and sounding like a winner, the kind of man who dives into his breakfast each morning with gusto.But for the president's friends, the prospect of nomination to high office has been transformed from what it ought to be -- a signal honor -- into something approaching humiliation.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | July 4, 1993
An innocently-chosen word, "Jewish," led to old charges of anti-Semitism against The Baltimore Sun by some Jewish readers when Ruth Bader Ginsburg was nominated to the Supreme Court.Here's the story. The Sun announced in its early editions June 15 the appointment of Judge Ginsburg to the court. Below the obvious major headline came a smaller one, "President picks Jewish woman for high court." The first paragraph noted she would be the first Jewish justice in 24 years.Late the previous night, an editor objected to the secondary headline as not being relevant enough.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | June 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When Ruth Bader Ginsburg graduated from law school in 1959, having been at the top of her classes at both Harvard and Columbia, she found that universities wouldn't even consider her for a possible teaching job.A Supreme Court justice turned her down for a clerkship on the basis of her sex.And as she said yesterday in the White House Rose Garden, pointing out a certain irony as she was being nominated by President Clinton for appointment to...
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a major setback for the medical marijuana movement, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that federal drug laws banning the manufacture and distribution of marijuana allow no exceptions, even for seriously ill patients who need the drug to survive. Ruling 8-0, the court rejected the claims of an Oakland, Calif., cannabis cooperative that it should be allowed to provide marijuana to patients with a "medical necessity." The court said that when Congress passed the Controlled Substances Act, it declined to create an exception for the medical use of marijuana and left no room for the courts to do so in its place.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Nearly a century and a half after the women's rights movement began, and just over 75 years after women gained a place in the U.S. Constitution with the right to vote, the Supreme Court is about to take up a plea to start a new legal revolution among the sexes.In a case that began in 1989 when an anonymous young woman failed to get into the male-only cadet ranks at Virginia Military Institute, the justices confront this week the most energetic effort in years to gain full constitutional protection for women.
NEWS
By LYLE DENNISTON and LYLE DENNISTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, taking on its most significant sex equality case in nearly two decades, agreed yesterday to settle the simmering constitutional dispute over the ban on women at Virginia Military Institute.The case appears to test whether "separate but equal" public education is as unconstitutional for women as it has been for blacks since the ruling in Brown vs. Board of Education in 1954.VMI, a prestigious military college in Lexington, Va., that is partly financed with state money, has allowed only men to enter during its 156-year existence.
NEWS
June 4, 1995
The Supreme Court said neither states nor Congress can impose term limits or any other qualifications on members of Congress beyond those specified in the Constitution's qualifications clauses: which require members to be a minimum age, U.S. citizens and inhabitants of their state. Sen. Hank Brown, R-Colo., said he therefore would propose that Congress define an "inhabitant" as someone who is "physically present" in a state for half the year for 12 years in a row. "So if you haven't been there you'd no longer qualify as an inhabitant."
NEWS
February 26, 1995
Is this the shape of things to come?: "BREYER, J., delivered the opinion of the Court, in which STEVENS, O'CONNOR, KENNEDY, SOUTER, and GINSBURG, JJ., joined. THOMAS, J., filed a dissenting opinion, in which REHNQUIST, C. J., and SCALIA, J., joined."That's the language at the end of a Supreme Court opinion issued last week in which six moderate to liberal justices out-voted three conservatives in a habeas corpus case. In so doing they seem to have changed the law in this area -- at least slightly and maybe more so. They definitely changed the tone of the constitutional argument on this issue, putting fairness above finality in the habeas debate.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | January 19, 1994
Chicago.--The year 1992 was billed as the Year of the Woman. But 1993 was just as good a year for women, and there is no reason to think 1994 will not be the same. Every year for some time to come will be a Year of the Woman. The floodgates have been opened. Talents long suppressed or contained or narrowly channeled are freed to receive deserved recognition.Hillary Rodham Clinton is one symbol of this -- yet we make a mistake if we think of her as exceptional in her professional background.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | June 17, 1993
Washington.--Let me advance a modest proposal. Next month the Senate Judiciary Committee will take up the nomination of Ruth Bader Ginsburg to the Supreme Court. When the committee puts together its list of witnesses, the list should be limited to: Ruth Bader Ginsburg.If committee staff have done their job, committee members will be fully prepared to question the nominee about her judicial philosophy. Various pressure groups, pro and con, also will have primed the senators. When members run out of questions to ZTC Judge Ginsburg, Chairman Biden should call for a vote.
NEWS
June 4, 1995
The Supreme Court said neither states nor Congress can impose term limits or any other qualifications on members of Congress beyond those specified in the Constitution's qualifications clauses: which require members to be a minimum age, U.S. citizens and inhabitants of their state. Sen. Hank Brown, R-Colo., said he therefore would propose that Congress define an "inhabitant" as someone who is "physically present" in a state for half the year for 12 years in a row. "So if you haven't been there you'd no longer qualify as an inhabitant."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 10, 1994
The Washington Opera's current production of Richard Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos" is almost pure magic: beautiful sets, insightful direction, wizardly lighting and solid singing make it as good as anything you're likely to see on stage this season."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Surrounded by symbolism, Teresa Harris will take a seat in the Supreme Court chamber this morning to watch -- somewhat uneasily -- the latest and perhaps last act in her role as a bit player in the history of America's female workers.Ms. Harris, who gave up her job in a Tennessee equipment rental company rather than listen to more sexual taunts from her boss, is the key figure in a case that may force fundamental changes in the way men and women deal with each other in the workplace.
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