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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | December 16, 1991
AS A MAGICIAN, James "The Amazing" Randi works hard to deceive his audience."I am a professional liar. A cheat. A charlatan. I am an actor who plays the part of a wizard," he says.What, then, could he possibly offer scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, more than 700 of whom packed an auditorium on government time recently to hear him.Scientists, after all, are devout seekers of truth.Aren't they?Not always, Randi told them.And who better than a cheat and a charlatan to lecture on fraud and self-delusion in science?
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EXPLORE
September 9, 2012
While the premise of the letter that only marriage between a man and a woman "provides a safe environment for children (by connecting) them to their two biological parents" and that children raised by same-sex parents would fare worse later in life than those raised by heterosexual couples fails on multiple counts, the most egregious fault is using bad science (the Regnerus study) to support the argument. ("Same-sex marriage amounts to experimenting on children," Sept. 6.) The Regnerus study itself acknowledges that what is really being compared with heterosexual families are not families headed by same-sex couples, but households in which parents broke up. This has long been established as a risk factor for poor outcomes in children.
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EXPLORE
September 9, 2012
While the premise of the letter that only marriage between a man and a woman "provides a safe environment for children (by connecting) them to their two biological parents" and that children raised by same-sex parents would fare worse later in life than those raised by heterosexual couples fails on multiple counts, the most egregious fault is using bad science (the Regnerus study) to support the argument. ("Same-sex marriage amounts to experimenting on children," Sept. 6.) The Regnerus study itself acknowledges that what is really being compared with heterosexual families are not families headed by same-sex couples, but households in which parents broke up. This has long been established as a risk factor for poor outcomes in children.
NEWS
May 5, 2011
In his article about Christian environmentalism ("Confluence of Good Friday, Earth Day a reminder of our duty to protect God's creation," May 3), Bishop John R. Schol, alluding to "Green Dragon" views of environmentalism as "actively anti-Christian," claims that some voices are "distorting the intentions and efforts of environmentally-minded Christians. " As founder of the Cornwall Alliance for the Stewardship of Creation — which produced a DVD series, "Resisting the Green Dragon" and works with many of the top evangelical leaders and ministries in America — I can tell you that an overwhelming number of us are glad to see Christians becoming increasingly involved in environmental stewardship.
NEWS
May 5, 2011
In his article about Christian environmentalism ("Confluence of Good Friday, Earth Day a reminder of our duty to protect God's creation," May 3), Bishop John R. Schol, alluding to "Green Dragon" views of environmentalism as "actively anti-Christian," claims that some voices are "distorting the intentions and efforts of environmentally-minded Christians. " As founder of the Cornwall Alliance for the Stewardship of Creation — which produced a DVD series, "Resisting the Green Dragon" and works with many of the top evangelical leaders and ministries in America — I can tell you that an overwhelming number of us are glad to see Christians becoming increasingly involved in environmental stewardship.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | June 2, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- The ''public health'' approach to gun control, born of desperation as crime becomes an ever greater national concern, is bad science and worse political philosophy.The bad science can be, and regularly is, refuted. But as usually happens in such cases, when the facts aren't on their side the advocates of the policy in question just turn up the volume and aim their moral fire hoses at the opposition. Thus academics like Gary Kleck, an anti-gun researcher from Florida who found to his surprise that the presence of guns in households is a statistically significant deterrent to crime, are now disparaged as puppets of the National Rifle Association.
NEWS
By Jon Margolis | November 23, 1993
THE French, who know human frailty, coined the phrase, "epater le bourgeois," meaning to shock respectable folks for the sake of shocking them.It's still done, and these days respectable folks come in greater variety. Among the preferred targets in some circles are environmentalists, who often deserve the treatment. A few of them do seem committed to the survival of every species save homo sapiens. And some have exaggerated both the certainty and the extent of global warming and the ozone hole.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
City convictions are tainted by police lab work The Sun's editorial on the issue of the gunshot residue testing regimen at the Baltimore Police Department's crime lab omits several salient facts and needlessly diminishes the significance of the systemic problems that exist ("Simply not staggering," editorial, March 28). To imply that it is acceptable to utilize any amount of "bad science" in a criminal case is simply indefensible. Whether one or 100 criminal convictions are tainted by the use of unreliable scientific evidence is not the appropriate question.
NEWS
January 29, 2000
Limiting coverage for mental health wouldn't save money In the latest of his many trivializing commentaries, "Satcher report is bad science" (Opinion Commentary, Jan. 23), Richard Vatz again strives to present himself as a voice of reason amid irrational mental health policy. He does not succeed. Make no mistake: Debate about our use of financial resources in the mental health arena is needed. However, the alternative Mr. Vatz proposes is coverage only for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression, which he labels "the true brain disorders."
NEWS
By Robert L. Park | September 12, 1991
I HAVE neighbors who worry because they don't have healthy cockroaches in their home; the only one they've seen in 15 years was on its back, kicking. They suspect the previous owner contaminated the house with a powerful pesticide, so they sleep with the windows wide open, even in mid-winter. Why not? they shrug; it also dissipates the radon seeping up from the basement.A year ago, watching Dan Rather on the evening news, they learned of a report prepared by the Environmental Protection Agency that warned that magnetic fields of 60 hertz are a "probable, but not proven," cause of cancer in humans.
NEWS
By Adil E. Shamoo and Bonnie Bricker | January 10, 2011
No parent wants to make his or her own child sick. So when Andrew Wakefield's 1998 study indicated that the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR) could cause children to develop autism, an entire industry developed to prevent the vaccine from being given. Along with scares that Thimerosal — a mercury preservative previously used in childhood vaccines — was a culprit in autism rates, anti-vaccine fury spread throughout the country. Media coverage was widespread.
NEWS
By HENRY WEINSTEIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 3, 2006
Four leading arson experts presented a report to Texas officials yesterday saying that the state executed an innocent man based on an erroneous interpretation of fire evidence. The arson experts reviewed the record of the murder trial of Cameron Willingham, convicted and sentenced to death for setting a fire in his Corsicana, Texas, home that led to the deaths of his three children in December 1991. The group concluded Willingham was convicted on the basis of "bad science." The state's expert witnesses "relied on interpretations of `indicators' that they were taught constituted evidence of arson.
NEWS
August 4, 2005
IT'S NOT SURPRISING that, when given the opportunity, President Bush would send sympathetic signals to his Christian conservative followers to show his support for their causes. That may have been what he was doing this week when he endorsed the teaching of "intelligent design" along with the theory of evolution in a wide-ranging interview with a small group of reporters from Texas. Mr. Bush said that both theories should be taught "so people can understand what the debate is about." Well, thanks, Mr. Bush, but there really should be no debate.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
City convictions are tainted by police lab work The Sun's editorial on the issue of the gunshot residue testing regimen at the Baltimore Police Department's crime lab omits several salient facts and needlessly diminishes the significance of the systemic problems that exist ("Simply not staggering," editorial, March 28). To imply that it is acceptable to utilize any amount of "bad science" in a criminal case is simply indefensible. Whether one or 100 criminal convictions are tainted by the use of unreliable scientific evidence is not the appropriate question.
NEWS
January 29, 2000
Limiting coverage for mental health wouldn't save money In the latest of his many trivializing commentaries, "Satcher report is bad science" (Opinion Commentary, Jan. 23), Richard Vatz again strives to present himself as a voice of reason amid irrational mental health policy. He does not succeed. Make no mistake: Debate about our use of financial resources in the mental health arena is needed. However, the alternative Mr. Vatz proposes is coverage only for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression, which he labels "the true brain disorders."
FEATURES
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1999
It's inevitable: When young girls hit puberty, they also hit the makeup counter.Experiments in lipstick and eyeshadow are as natural as their newfound obsession with the male of the species. What doesn't come naturally, however, is the knowledge that the nail polish and hair color they use as teen-agers can have long-lasting, sometimes unwanted effects. To remedy this problem, the Maryland Science Center gave teen-age girls some insight into what makes up makeup with its "Bad Girl Science" workshop.
NEWS
August 4, 2005
IT'S NOT SURPRISING that, when given the opportunity, President Bush would send sympathetic signals to his Christian conservative followers to show his support for their causes. That may have been what he was doing this week when he endorsed the teaching of "intelligent design" along with the theory of evolution in a wide-ranging interview with a small group of reporters from Texas. Mr. Bush said that both theories should be taught "so people can understand what the debate is about." Well, thanks, Mr. Bush, but there really should be no debate.
NEWS
March 28, 1991
Five years ago, a junior researcher on a federally supported investigation of immune system behavior blew the whistle on what she thought were inaccuracies, misinterpretations and misjudgments in producing a paper for Cell, a scientific journal. Blowing the whistle may seem a fine tradition, but in the elite circles of science, where reputations, connections and image are so important, it cost the junior researcher, post-doctoral fellow Margot O'Toole, her laboratory job.An outcry followed, if slow to build in intensity.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 17, 1999
For those who have been wondering how low NBC can go in this year of the wheels coming off its prime-time schedule, I direct your attention to "Confirmation: The Hard Evidence of Aliens Among Us?" tonight on the once-mighty Peacock Network."Confirmation" is a two-hour "reality" special featuring scary music, junk science, "re-creations" of aliens experimenting on humans and a narrator asking such questions as, "What is the alien agenda?" and "Could an alien race actually be conducting a large-scale abduction campaign?"
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