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NEWS
June 15, 2012
Dan Rodricks was firing on all cylinders in his recent column on gambling in Maryland ("A casino switch that's moral," June 12). I couldn't agree more with him that casinos are generally bad news. They're the conduit for a massive diversion of wealth from those who can least afford it to the hands of the 1 percent. They create lots of minimum wage jobs of the kind we really don't need more of. The planned downtown Baltimore casino would be a disaster. It's bad enough to have one just a hop, skip and jump down the road at Arundel Mills.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
  You can only shake your head in wonderment at cable TV when an ESPN show host gets it wrong as to what's in an investigative report that his own channel just published. And worse, it's on one of the biggest stories in the history of professional sports. That happened with Bob Ley on ESPN yesterday as he reported the results of a probe by the channel's "Outside the Lines" team into the Ray Rice elevator attack on his then-fiancée and what is looking more each day like a cover-up on the part of the NFL and the Baltimore Ravens.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Count Orioles first-round draft pick Kevin Gausman among those devastated by the news that snack food company Hostess is closing its doors. Other than his promise as a future front-line, right-handed starter, Gausman -- the fourth overall pick in June's draft out of LSU -- is known for having a quirky set of superstitions. Among them is eating four powdered mini-doughnuts before innings when he pitches. His preferred mini-doughnut of choice is Hostess' powdered Donettes.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 27, 2014
News from the future: •President Elizabeth Warren welcomed the 10 millionth underage child to illegally immigrate to the U.S. and immediately offered each of them and their children free tuition at the university of their choosing. The president explained that such tuition "assistance" represented reparations for America's racist, imperialist past. Interestingly, the Warren administration exempted the children from Obamacare coverage, explaining that new arrivals had a right to higher quality health care than where they came from.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 17, 2011
I appreciate a good beard when I see one -- maybe it's because I can't grow one above my neck -- so I am bummed out to see that Orioles starter Jake Arrieta had shaved off his amazing Al Borland beard from FanFest. In case you missed it, the beard was breathtaking .  Yes, I know it's because the Orioles have a facial hair policy, which is ridiculous. How can Koji Uehara grow sideburns like these but Arrieta can't take a page out of Brian Wilson's book ? I guess it's to avoid a situation like this one (sorry, Nick Markakis)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
  The apology by CBS News for a Benghazi report it aired Oct. 27 on "60 Minutes" is big, bad news for the network. Lara Logan, who was the correspondent on the report, went on the network's morning show and made the apology in the video that runs with this post. Logan told viewers of "CBS This Morning" Friday that "60 Minutes" was wrong in believing the account of a source who said he was an eye witness to some of what took place during an attack in 2012 on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 23, 2010
Dr. Rhonda S. Fishel, the acting chief of surgery at Sinai Hospital who used her own cancer diagnosis as a basis for creating a program that helped guide fellow physicians in delivering bad news to patients, died Sunday of the disease at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The Owings Mills resident was 55. The daughter of a surgeon and a homemaker, Dr. Fishel was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville. She was a 1973 graduate of Pikesville High School. She attended Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa., for two years before entering the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, from which she graduated in 1978.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | August 29, 2010
Ravens fans, I come to you today highly conflicted about your football team. I come to you with good news and bad news. This being Baltimore, the home office of gloom and doom, let's get the bad news out of the way first. Bad news item No. 1: Donte' Stallworth has a broken foot. The speedy wide receiver broke it in the Ravens' 24-10 drubbing of the New York Giants on Saturday night. He's expected to be out at least a couple of months as surgeons attempt to insert a screw to help the bone heal.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson
hudmud@aol.com
and By Kathy Hudson
hudmud@aol.com
| February 8, 2012
News that the Giant at the Rotunda is moving west to the old Superfresh store is good news. It will be great to have a Giant that's larger and comparable to the one on York Road north of Gittings Avenue.   The bad news is that the supermarket site at the Rotunda will be vacant. Those who work at the Rotunda and  those who shop at the other stores in that once bustling shopping center will miss having a handy grocery in the building. So will the residents of Roland Park Place and the senior high rises on Roland Avenue south of 40th street.    While the Giant will not be far away, it will be down a hill and farther from those seniors than it was before.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
If you think, or are hoping, that the 162-game suspension imposed on New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez has brought an end to the Biogenesis saga or A-Rod's controvery-laced career, think again. The ruling by arbitrator Frederic Horowitz, which reduced the original suspension that Major League Baseball handed down to Rodriguez from 211 games to 162, may stand up to a federal court challenge by Rodriguez and his small army of attorneys, but you can bet that we'll still be wondering next month whether he'll be allowed to start the 2014 season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee and For The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
The good news: Ezra isn't A. The bad news: Ezra was still in a relationship with Aria for all of the wrong reasons. Aria fights tears as she shares with the girls all of the details she uncovered about Ezra and his book. While the girls are relieved that he isn't A, they can't help but question why he went to such great lengths to get close for a story, including creating a relationship with Aria -- and his theory that one of the girls killed Allison. The tears can't stop coming as Aria flashes back to the moment she met Ezra in the bar. Ezra's reveal has made Aria more than upset, but physically sick.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
If you think, or are hoping, that the 162-game suspension imposed on New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez has brought an end to the Biogenesis saga or A-Rod's controvery-laced career, think again. The ruling by arbitrator Frederic Horowitz, which reduced the original suspension that Major League Baseball handed down to Rodriguez from 211 games to 162, may stand up to a federal court challenge by Rodriguez and his small army of attorneys, but you can bet that we'll still be wondering next month whether he'll be allowed to start the 2014 season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
  The apology by CBS News for a Benghazi report it aired Oct. 27 on "60 Minutes" is big, bad news for the network. Lara Logan, who was the correspondent on the report, went on the network's morning show and made the apology in the video that runs with this post. Logan told viewers of "CBS This Morning" Friday that "60 Minutes" was wrong in believing the account of a source who said he was an eye witness to some of what took place during an attack in 2012 on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | October 24, 2013
There is so much that criminals do that's reprehensible, it can seem silly to dwell on the minutiae that's merely galling. Yet the insult that's being heaped on too many Harford County residents to their injury of being robbed is maddening. It's not exactly new, but the relatively recent trend that's infuriating is the increase in the number of daytime burglaries. When Harford County's decent, hard-working people go off to their jobs to earn an honest living, criminals are breaking into their homes and stealing from them.
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 16, 2013
Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is got attention last week for saying two stunningly ignorant things: that the Senate needs 100 members just like the late Sen. Jesse Helms and that a government shutdown at the end of this month would be no big deal. His comment about North Carolina's Helms is fairly inconsequential. If he thinks the Senate would be a better institution if it were composed of 100 unrepentant, bigoted segregationists, that is his business. But his willingness to let the federal government stop functioning for any amount of time is everyone's business, and it is consequential because Mr. Cruz is one of the leaders of the tea party faction of congressional Republicans that is merrily sprinting toward that cliff.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 8, 2013
The political football of health insurance, supposedly taken off the playing field in 2012 by the Supreme Court decision declaring the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act constitutional, is being kicked around again. The Obama administration has put the ball in the air just in time for the approaching 2014 congressional elections with its decision to delay for another year the employer mandate requiring companies with 50 or more workers employees to provide coverage. Many Democrats assumed that the surprising vote of Chief Justice John Roberts in the 5-4 decision on what for good or ill is now universally known as Obamacare had killed its opposition as a decisive political issue.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Baltimore's Union Square Christmas Cookie Tour is often less about cookies than it is about the houses that open their doors to serve them. "These are Victorian houses, and they are almost always under construction or restoration," said Sylva Lin. "Everybody loves to come in and see the progress. And you get all sorts of advice. People will ask why you haven't finished the basement yet. " Chris Taylor, whose wife, Megan, will make about 500 cookies for visitors, said repeat visitors are the real heart of the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Cable news was mostly bad news in Day One of the Trayvon Martin trial. Why am I not shocked that once again 24/7 cable news failed to rise to a big-news occasion loaded with powerful sociological implications? MSNBC promised fabulous live coverage of the trial. But when prosecuting attorney John Guy used the F-word as the third word in his opening argument, MSNBC didn't have a delay in place. And they still didn't have one in place when he used it a second time for dramatic effect.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
In just a few hours, No. 13 Johns Hopkins will take the field at Michie Stadium in West Point, N.Y., for its regular-season finale against Army. But the Blue Jays' bid for an appearance in its 42nd consecutive NCAA tournament  suffered a blow via the Colonial Athletic Association tournament. Towson upset No. 9 Penn State, 11-10, in Friday's conference tournament final at University Park, Pa. The win secured the Tigers' first CAA tournament championship since 2007, which was also the last time they appeared in the NCAA tournament.
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