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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
Stranger things have happened, but in a recent 14-minute conversation, Kelly Osbourne is actually polite. The "b" word - you know, the one that rhymes with "witch" - makes a mere three appearances. And the four-letter word she uses on the MTV reality show The Osbournes about as often as any teen would use "like" surfaces only once. Ask the 18-year-old wild child of Ozzy Osbourne about her usual potty mouth, however, and that really sets her off. "People need to loosen up," she says, in a call from a Minneapolis hotel room.
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By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
After 20 students assumed a meditative position with feet flat on the floor, backs straight, and eyes closed or gazes averted, Stan Eisenstein began preparing them to absorb meditation and mindfulness teachings during a recent class. "Get a sense of yourself, here in this room," he instructed the group. "Bring your awareness right here, right now. "You've been running around school all day. Feel yourself sitting in your chair, and get a little bit of a sense of your mood and feelings right this minute.
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SPORTS
December 14, 2001
Cole Field House highlight 10 Games remaining Jan. 9, 1971: Maryland defeats South Carolina, 31-30, in overtime of the famous "slow-down" game in which the Terps led 4-3 at halftime. Cole finale: March 3 vs. Virginia He said it "I don't know what they feed people in Louisiana, but everybody I know from there is always happy. I've never seen Byron in a bad mood." Juan Dixon, Terps guard, on Mouton, who is from Rayne, La.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 10, 2013
My columnist and television pundit gigs have me thinking a great deal about the relative positions of the two parties heading into the midterm election cycle. For starters, the Democrats are ahead. Last November's elections gave the president a surprisingly strong victory and provided him with a comfortable margin in the U.S. Senate. These results have the usual suspects (Hollywood, academia, mainstream media) all aflutter with thoughts of an emergent progressive era in America. The picture is decidedly less rosy on the other side of the aisle.
FEATURES
By Ellen O'Brien | November 30, 1993
On average, people classify every third day as a "bad day," according to Randy Larsen, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, who has been researching moods for a decade.He identified 14 strategies that people rely on most consistently to cheer themselves up. Seven are effective short-term cures, two are less effective and five are self-defeating.The seven most effective short-term cures and Mr. Larsen's comments:* Problem-directed action: Actually doing something to solve the problem at the root of the depression.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 30, 1997
A GREAT MANY adults go through their days agitated and irritable and depressed and resentful, and when they have the energy to wonder why they feel this way, they decide that it is because of their own failings.Some women suspect it is their hormones and some men suspect it is their sea-level spot on the corporate mountain. Everybody thinks it is because he or she is getting older, and there is now more of life behind than in front.I am here to suggest that it is none of those things.Our middle-aged malaise is not our fault.
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By Niki Scott | April 5, 1992
When several old friends and I finally found time to see one another this week, they seemed to spend most of our time together beating themselves up."I wish I were a morning person," said one. "I should be.""I'm a terrible procrastinator," said another. "I constantly promise myself to shape up and stop putting projects off, but I can't seem to stop it.""The work I turn out is usually first-class, but I'm always so mad at myself for putting it off that I get no pleasure from knowing this," said a third.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1994
When was the last time you saw an artist in a fringed bikini, a violinist don a leather jumpsuit, a marketing consultant sparkle in a sequined bustier?Well, if you've seen Andrea Ratajczak, who works in all these professions and owns all these clothes, you've seen it all.Tucked away in two closets and the attic of her Irvington home is a wardrobe that's as eclectic and versatile as she is."I'm not voluptuous," says Ms. Ratajczak, 34. "I'm short and small-boned. What I've been able to do is dress in a way that's tasteful and yet a little bit on the provocative side."
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | October 7, 2006
Medication wasn't helping Dan Ryan, a sweet but troubled teenager, and traditional counseling was sometimes a foot-tapping bore. So though his family had some doubts, he exchanged the psychologist's office for therapy in an outdoor ring with some large, soulful creatures named Honey Bee, Navajo and Jack. Three years later, Dan and his mother say that horse therapy did more for him than any other intervention he tried. It can sound odd, even silly, to the uninitiated. But many have gotten past the eyebrow-lifting to find that the practice known as equine-assisted psychotherapy is not analysis for horses or expensive riding lessons with a psychiatrist.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 6, 2008
Congratulations are in order. I am going to be a mother-in-law. (When I tell people the news - and I have told positively everybody - they all have the same question: "Do we like her?" blunting this indelicate question by using the first person plural. "Yes, we do!" is my unequivocal answer.) Being a mother-in-law beats being a grandmother, for those of us who still think of ourselves as 26, but not by much. Mothers-in-law are just this side of Disney's evil stepmothers in the lexicon of family characters.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
As a kid, Allison Schmitt's sport was soccer. She even had a Mia Hamm Barbie doll. If she imagined back then that she would find herself at the Olympics someday, it would have been as a teammate of Hope Solo and Alex Morgan. Instead, she is poised for a breakout Olympics in swimming. "I had the decision made for me when I got cut from the team at 12," she says of her stunted soccer career. "Swimming was a no-cut sport. " Schmitt, 22, is perhaps best known these days to casual followers of swimming as Michael Phelps ' training partner, first in her native Michigan and then at North Baltimore Aquatic Club, and the person the previously burned-out swimmer credits with helping him rediscover the joy of swimming.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
If it were up to Matt Wieters , he'd catch 162 games in a season. That, of course, will never happen. "I'd like to catch them all," Wieters said with a smile, "but I don't think that is physically possible. " Orioles manager Buck Showalter sat Wieters on Saturday afternoon, just the fifth time this season the 24-year-old hasn't started behind the plate. "It's nice to get a day off, it will probably be good for the body," Wieters said. "I think rest will be good today and help me feel really strong tomorrow.
SPORTS
By KEVIN COWHERD | August 20, 2009
Down to the last few days of training camp, the Ravens are a cranky bunch. Look, it's hard enough being around normal-size people in a bad mood - think of the screamers at these town hall meetings on health care reform. But being around a lot of big guys tired of grueling two-a-days in the hot sun takes moodiness to a whole different level. "Everybody's on edge," defensive tackle Trevor Pryce said. "Everyone's a little stir-crazy. The walls are starting to close in." "Everyone's tired of hitting each other," nose tackle Kelly Gregg said.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 6, 2008
Congratulations are in order. I am going to be a mother-in-law. (When I tell people the news - and I have told positively everybody - they all have the same question: "Do we like her?" blunting this indelicate question by using the first person plural. "Yes, we do!" is my unequivocal answer.) Being a mother-in-law beats being a grandmother, for those of us who still think of ourselves as 26, but not by much. Mothers-in-law are just this side of Disney's evil stepmothers in the lexicon of family characters.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 2, 2007
CHICAGO -- Americans have many reasons for gloom. The war in Iraq has yet to turn around, we can't agree on a solution for illegal immigration, and Lindsay Lohan isn't cute anymore. We also have one reason to be happy: the economy. But right now we're in the middle of a good funk, and we don't want to let any sunshine intrude. When it comes to the economy, the national mood is a combination of dissatisfaction and fear. A recent Gallup poll found that 66 percent of Americans think national economic conditions are "only fair" or "poor."
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun Reporter | October 16, 2006
The Ravens first lost their quarterback. Then they lost their bite on defense. By the end of yesterday's deflating 23-21 loss to the Carolina Panthers, the Ravens had lost something they had built all season long. Hello, bye week. Goodbye, momentum. Lapses on offense in the first half and breakdowns on defense in the second half snowballed into the Ravens' second straight loss and two weeks of second-guessing. "Our momentum has taken a hit," said tight end Todd Heap, whose face - a bloody bandage over the bridge of his nose - symbolized the beaten-up state of the team.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
If it were up to Matt Wieters , he'd catch 162 games in a season. That, of course, will never happen. "I'd like to catch them all," Wieters said with a smile, "but I don't think that is physically possible. " Orioles manager Buck Showalter sat Wieters on Saturday afternoon, just the fifth time this season the 24-year-old hasn't started behind the plate. "It's nice to get a day off, it will probably be good for the body," Wieters said. "I think rest will be good today and help me feel really strong tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Ellen O'Brien and Ellen O'Brien,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 30, 1993
If you're wondering how it happened again -- how you woke up in a good mood and drove to work in a good mood and hung up your coat in a good mood, and now suddenly you're in a bad mood -- then look around you. Surreptitiously.Because you probably caught it. That nasty mood. You probably caught it like a bad cold.Moods are as contagious as viruses. We pick them up from other people automatically, unconsciously -- and within milliseconds.That's the bad news. The worse news is that the more accommodating, sensitive and empathetic we are by nature -- in short, the "nicer" we are -- the more apt we are to become the victims of other people's conquering negativity and plain blue funks.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | October 7, 2006
Medication wasn't helping Dan Ryan, a sweet but troubled teenager, and traditional counseling was sometimes a foot-tapping bore. So though his family had some doubts, he exchanged the psychologist's office for therapy in an outdoor ring with some large, soulful creatures named Honey Bee, Navajo and Jack. Three years later, Dan and his mother say that horse therapy did more for him than any other intervention he tried. It can sound odd, even silly, to the uninitiated. But many have gotten past the eyebrow-lifting to find that the practice known as equine-assisted psychotherapy is not analysis for horses or expensive riding lessons with a psychiatrist.
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