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NEWS
November 30, 2010
I guess the government never learned what my mother told me, "If you don't have something nice to say about someone, don't say anything at all" ("The latest from WikiLeaks: gossip," Nov. 30). I hate to break this news to the president, but no one likes us anyway, so who cares about this leak? Steve Cuprzynski, Cockeysville
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Business author Richie Frieman has studied fine arts at the University of Maryland, launched a music-focused Internet magazine, written children's books, invented a device that keeps shirt collars crisp and created a pop culture-inspired children's clothing line - Charm City Babies. He even toured the Mid-Atlantic as a professional wrestler, retiring in 2008. So what does all of that have to do with good manners? Frieman, author of workplace etiquette book "Reply All … And Other Ways to Tank Your Career," considers himself an artist first and foremost.
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FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Etiquette expert Dorothea Johnson tells the story of the businessman who came to her for help after losing out on a plum assignment.At a lunch meeting with a senior executive in the company, he sat down and immediately started eating the salad in front of him. He looked up to see his boss, who hadn't picked up his fork yet, staring at him."I knew right then they weren't going to send me out," he said.If only he had taken a dining tutorial offered by Johnson's Protocol School of Washington before his lunch, he would have known to wait until his host started eating.
NEWS
March 15, 2011
Players on the Maryland men's basketball team have frequently bad-mouthed the NIT over the years, and I recall one player referring to the NIT as a banishment to hell. This may be a case of most of the team suffering for the bad manners of a few, but there you are and that's life. I said to my wife and neighbor just yesterday, I would not blame the NIT if they didn't invite Maryland. If someone tells me I live in a lousy neighborhood and why don't I move, they needn't expect an invitation to my house.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Business author Richie Frieman has studied fine arts at the University of Maryland, launched a music-focused Internet magazine, written children's books, invented a device that keeps shirt collars crisp and created a pop culture-inspired children's clothing line - Charm City Babies. He even toured the Mid-Atlantic as a professional wrestler, retiring in 2008. So what does all of that have to do with good manners? Frieman, author of workplace etiquette book "Reply All … And Other Ways to Tank Your Career," considers himself an artist first and foremost.
NEWS
June 24, 1994
THOUGHTS for the day:"Scratch a lover and find a foe."-- Dorothy ParkerAnd from Fred Allen: "A celebrity is a person who works hard all his life to become well known, then wears dark glasses to avoid being recognized."* * *A JUNE 22 letter to the editor of the Wall Street Journal, complaining about an editorial, Gayle L. Lawrence of West Windsor, N.J., wrote:"It is unbelievable to me that you have apparently espoused the notion, like much of our society, that breast-feeding in public should not be considered a perfectly natural, unoffensive act. The next time my baby gets hungry in a public setting and I choose to breast-feed, should I be subjected to taunts of 'Trollope!
NEWS
March 15, 2011
Players on the Maryland men's basketball team have frequently bad-mouthed the NIT over the years, and I recall one player referring to the NIT as a banishment to hell. This may be a case of most of the team suffering for the bad manners of a few, but there you are and that's life. I said to my wife and neighbor just yesterday, I would not blame the NIT if they didn't invite Maryland. If someone tells me I live in a lousy neighborhood and why don't I move, they needn't expect an invitation to my house.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Evening Sun Staff | October 30, 1991
SOME TITLES would never make it on most kids' most wanted lists. ''101 Tips on Cleaning Your Room,'' for instance, or ''How to Make Your Little Sister Happy Without Really Trying.''Any book called ''Manners'' would fit into that category, right? Not quite.Not when it's written and illustrated by Aliki, whose non-fiction books are wildly popular with kids ages 4 and up. She may be best known for her dinosaur books -- including ''Digging Up Dinosaurs'' and ''My Visit to the Dinosaurs'' -- and the fun little illustrations of folks in those books also people the cartoon-like sequences in ''Manners,'' (Greenwillow Books, $12.95, ages 5 and up)
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 8, 1995
Somehow, it was bigger than ever we knew. Cal was sweeter than we knew. The fans were louder than we knew.And I think I know why.It wasn't the record, exactly. Of course, the record is phenomenal. It's almost as phenomenal as that big rock his teammates gave him.But the record -- and certainly the rock -- meant less than the moment. We wanted a moment like that. More precisely, we needed a moment like that. And so we cheered until we were hoarse and cried until we literally ran dry and booed anyone -- meaning Orioles owner Peter Angelos, who seemed to think the moment was about him -- who tried to get in our way.We were celebrating the streak, the record and Cal. Mostly, Cal.Here's my theory: All we ask, in life, is a reason to believe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 5, 2000
Susan Sontag is one of the most interesting minds in America. I first became aware of her by reading her still often-anthologized essay, "Notes on Camp," published in 1964 in Partisan Review. It created a stir among my chattier friends, who recommended it. It brilliantly made clear the concept of the then-burgeoning mockery of seriousness. (Think pink flamingos.) The analytic discipline and the precision of expression in that piece launched the term "camp" into the common vocabulary. It began to convince me that Sontag was one of those rare talents who combine the creative insight of the artist and the comprehensive perspective of the scholar at their best.
NEWS
November 30, 2010
I guess the government never learned what my mother told me, "If you don't have something nice to say about someone, don't say anything at all" ("The latest from WikiLeaks: gossip," Nov. 30). I hate to break this news to the president, but no one likes us anyway, so who cares about this leak? Steve Cuprzynski, Cockeysville
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 5, 2000
Susan Sontag is one of the most interesting minds in America. I first became aware of her by reading her still often-anthologized essay, "Notes on Camp," published in 1964 in Partisan Review. It created a stir among my chattier friends, who recommended it. It brilliantly made clear the concept of the then-burgeoning mockery of seriousness. (Think pink flamingos.) The analytic discipline and the precision of expression in that piece launched the term "camp" into the common vocabulary. It began to convince me that Sontag was one of those rare talents who combine the creative insight of the artist and the comprehensive perspective of the scholar at their best.
NEWS
March 16, 1998
SOMETHING like a quick flash of lightning startled commuter Jeri Delambo recently on eastbound Northern Parkway.But it turned out to be a man-made storm."
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
Etiquette expert Dorothea Johnson tells the story of the businessman who came to her for help after losing out on a plum assignment.At a lunch meeting with a senior executive in the company, he sat down and immediately started eating the salad in front of him. He looked up to see his boss, who hadn't picked up his fork yet, staring at him."I knew right then they weren't going to send me out," he said.If only he had taken a dining tutorial offered by Johnson's Protocol School of Washington before his lunch, he would have known to wait until his host started eating.
NEWS
By JEFF STEIN | February 23, 1997
A CURTAIN IS dropping on the last act of the Cold War. The moles.Beset by financial woes, penetrated by the CIA, strait-jacketed by U.S. financial aid to Boris N. Yeltsin, and struggling with dire challenges on its own border, the Russian spy service - now known as the SRV - has virtually given up trying to recruit spies deep in the U.S. government, often referred to as moles.These days Russian agents in Moscow's embassy in Washington spend their time hustling for future jobs with American companies in Russia.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
HERSHEY, Pa. -- The Hershey Bears, affiliated with the NHL's Philadelphia Flyers for the past 10 years, tried to emulate the famed Broad Street Bullies of the '70s last night. They weren't even close.First making the mistake of trying to match speed with the niftier Bandits, then making it a game of power plays, the Bears were blown out, 7-2, by their AHL adversaries from down the road on I-83.It was nowhere near that close, because the Bandits breezed to a 7-0 lead in the first 36 minutes of play and eased in thereafter.
NEWS
June 11, 1994
Baltimore City and Maryland state officials want the Hyde School, a New England boarding school, to take over the educationally bankrupt Patterson High School in East Baltimore. It now turns out that Patterson's problems extend to a lack of good manners, too.Hyde's program stresses "character-building." It tries to inculcate in its students -- at its Maine school and at a troubled New Haven, Conn., public school -- the values of courage, integrity, leadership, curiosity and concern. It requires a heavy dose of parent participation.
NEWS
By JEFF STEIN | February 23, 1997
A CURTAIN IS dropping on the last act of the Cold War. The moles.Beset by financial woes, penetrated by the CIA, strait-jacketed by U.S. financial aid to Boris N. Yeltsin, and struggling with dire challenges on its own border, the Russian spy service - now known as the SRV - has virtually given up trying to recruit spies deep in the U.S. government, often referred to as moles.These days Russian agents in Moscow's embassy in Washington spend their time hustling for future jobs with American companies in Russia.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 8, 1995
Somehow, it was bigger than ever we knew. Cal was sweeter than we knew. The fans were louder than we knew.And I think I know why.It wasn't the record, exactly. Of course, the record is phenomenal. It's almost as phenomenal as that big rock his teammates gave him.But the record -- and certainly the rock -- meant less than the moment. We wanted a moment like that. More precisely, we needed a moment like that. And so we cheered until we were hoarse and cried until we literally ran dry and booed anyone -- meaning Orioles owner Peter Angelos, who seemed to think the moment was about him -- who tried to get in our way.We were celebrating the streak, the record and Cal. Mostly, Cal.Here's my theory: All we ask, in life, is a reason to believe.
NEWS
June 24, 1994
THOUGHTS for the day:"Scratch a lover and find a foe."-- Dorothy ParkerAnd from Fred Allen: "A celebrity is a person who works hard all his life to become well known, then wears dark glasses to avoid being recognized."* * *A JUNE 22 letter to the editor of the Wall Street Journal, complaining about an editorial, Gayle L. Lawrence of West Windsor, N.J., wrote:"It is unbelievable to me that you have apparently espoused the notion, like much of our society, that breast-feeding in public should not be considered a perfectly natural, unoffensive act. The next time my baby gets hungry in a public setting and I choose to breast-feed, should I be subjected to taunts of 'Trollope!
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