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By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2002
The area's first large snowstorm in nearly three years was a bit like opera: People loved or hated it. They embraced or they endured it. But rare was the person with no opinion about the upheaval and the beauty brought by yesterday's unusual visitation of weather. In the flakes that showered his Silver Spring driveway, construction worker and El Salvador native Elmer Aparicio saw "the hand of God." Sherry Rexrode saw 65 miles of treacherous road between her home near Gettysburg, Pa., and her Ellicott City job. In Annapolis, Roy Zaidenberg, a St. John's College sophomore, used a snow-covered Acura as a canvas on which to write for his girlfriend: "Roy loves Libby," with a heart for "loves."
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NEWS
By Ben Krull | October 26, 2011
The race for the Republican presidential nomination turned nasty this week, as Mitt Romney's former hairstylist, Francois Lockes, accused the GOP front-runner of using hair color to grey his temples. "Monsieur Romney est inauthentique," Mr. Lockes, a French citizen, told reporters. "Le candidat would shave his head pour un vote!" The Romney campaign denied the accusation. "Frank the barber is a disgruntled former employee who was fired for trying to spike Mitt's chamomile tea with caffeine," said a Romney spokesperson.
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NEWS
By Ben Krull | October 26, 2011
The race for the Republican presidential nomination turned nasty this week, as Mitt Romney's former hairstylist, Francois Lockes, accused the GOP front-runner of using hair color to grey his temples. "Monsieur Romney est inauthentique," Mr. Lockes, a French citizen, told reporters. "Le candidat would shave his head pour un vote!" The Romney campaign denied the accusation. "Frank the barber is a disgruntled former employee who was fired for trying to spike Mitt's chamomile tea with caffeine," said a Romney spokesperson.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
People would beg, borrow and steal for locks of long, luxurious hair. That much is clear from reports of an unusual burglary in North Baltimore. A thief broke into a Greenmount Avenue salon this month. He grabbed a radio, a VCR and some health care products. And a box of hair. Two days later, salon owner Salimata Camara couldn't believe what she saw outside a drugstore. There was a man trying to unload $700 worth of hair imported from China. "I knew it was my hair," Camara said. "Do you know how much he wanted to sell it for?
NEWS
By Kiah Stokes | November 10, 1994
AS A YOUNG African-American girl growing up in northeast Baltimore, I often thought of myself as the oddball when it came to hair.Between the ages of 8 to 18, I felt that every day was a bad hair day for me because I had short hair that seemingly refused to grow. I envied the other girls -- including most of my African-American friends and relatives -- who had long locks. It didn't help that most of my female relatives have hair that grows like the sprouts on a Chia Pet.I often heard, "Kiah, hair isn't everything you know."
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
Here's something everyone knows in the black community: Black women do not come out in public with their hair looking a mess. Unh-unh, sister. They just don't do it. And if they do, you know something has to be wrong. Someone has died, perhaps. Or a crazed burglar broke in and stole every brush, comb, curling iron, hair care product, wig, ball cap, bobby pin, butterfly clip and ponytail holder in the house. So how did Dr. Miracle's - an African-American hair care company fairly new to the beauty market - persuade dozens of local women to come out on Saturday to Mondawmin Mall with uncombed, dried-out, broken-off, over-processed, matted, stringy, poofy manes of wild, uncontrollable hair all over their heads?
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
People would beg, borrow and steal for locks of long, luxurious hair. That much is clear from reports of an unusual burglary in North Baltimore. A thief broke into a Greenmount Avenue salon this month. He grabbed a radio, a VCR and some health care products. And a box of hair. Two days later, salon owner Salimata Camara couldn't believe what she saw outside a drugstore. There was a man trying to unload $700 worth of hair imported from China. "I knew it was my hair," Camara said. "Do you know how much he wanted to sell it for?
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 30, 2000
WASHINGTON - On paper, Al Gore might seem to have it all: Few doubt his intelligence, his resume is solid if not unblemished, and he comes from an administration that reigned over an era of great prosperity. But when some voters muse about what's wrong with the Democratic candidate - why the polls remain so tight and why he must fight to keep pace with Republican rival George W. Bush with barely a week left in the race - they often pin it on one simple problem. Some people just don't like him. With the economy strong and the nation at peace, voters feel free to consider personality over policy.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1996
JUST HOURS ago, the Maryland General Assembly adjourned sine die. All that's left now until next January is the legal and fiscal hangover from the last 90-day binge.To many Marylanders, exactly what legislators do down there in Annapolis is a mystery. (In fact, to many who make their living in the capital, including some senators and delegates, it's a mystery.)Your correspondent was reminded of the former last week, when one political neophyte asked why a certain bill didn't pass this year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 30, 2005
Beauty Shop wastes an awful lot of talent, both by settling for the ordinary when it should be striving for something more, and by failing to resolve an apparent disconnect between those making the movie and those acting in it. Queen Latifah, reprising the role she originated in last year's Barbershop 2: Back In Business, is Gina, a hairstylist recently relocated from Chicago (where, presumably, Ice Cube and his Barbershop franchise are still holding forth)...
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
Here's something everyone knows in the black community: Black women do not come out in public with their hair looking a mess. Unh-unh, sister. They just don't do it. And if they do, you know something has to be wrong. Someone has died, perhaps. Or a crazed burglar broke in and stole every brush, comb, curling iron, hair care product, wig, ball cap, bobby pin, butterfly clip and ponytail holder in the house. So how did Dr. Miracle's - an African-American hair care company fairly new to the beauty market - persuade dozens of local women to come out on Saturday to Mondawmin Mall with uncombed, dried-out, broken-off, over-processed, matted, stringy, poofy manes of wild, uncontrollable hair all over their heads?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 30, 2005
Beauty Shop wastes an awful lot of talent, both by settling for the ordinary when it should be striving for something more, and by failing to resolve an apparent disconnect between those making the movie and those acting in it. Queen Latifah, reprising the role she originated in last year's Barbershop 2: Back In Business, is Gina, a hairstylist recently relocated from Chicago (where, presumably, Ice Cube and his Barbershop franchise are still holding forth)...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 11, 2003
Three series premiere tonight, and the best that can be said about them is that they offer a handy, one-night snapshot of what an overwhelmingly sorry lineup of new programs the networks are offering this fall. UPN's The Mullets is not just bad, it's maddeningly awful. Its depiction of working-class life through the knuckle-headed behavior of its two leading characters, brothers Dwayne (Michael Weaver) and Denny (David Hornsby) Mullet is television stereoptyping at its worst. Promotional materials circulated by UPN describe the brothers as "blue-collar, wrestling-loving, lighthearted, optimistic guys who sport the hairstyle that bears their surname - identical mullet haircuts."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2002
The area's first large snowstorm in nearly three years was a bit like opera: People loved or hated it. They embraced or they endured it. But rare was the person with no opinion about the upheaval and the beauty brought by yesterday's unusual visitation of weather. In the flakes that showered his Silver Spring driveway, construction worker and El Salvador native Elmer Aparicio saw "the hand of God." Sherry Rexrode saw 65 miles of treacherous road between her home near Gettysburg, Pa., and her Ellicott City job. In Annapolis, Roy Zaidenberg, a St. John's College sophomore, used a snow-covered Acura as a canvas on which to write for his girlfriend: "Roy loves Libby," with a heart for "loves."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 30, 2000
WASHINGTON - On paper, Al Gore might seem to have it all: Few doubt his intelligence, his resume is solid if not unblemished, and he comes from an administration that reigned over an era of great prosperity. But when some voters muse about what's wrong with the Democratic candidate - why the polls remain so tight and why he must fight to keep pace with Republican rival George W. Bush with barely a week left in the race - they often pin it on one simple problem. Some people just don't like him. With the economy strong and the nation at peace, voters feel free to consider personality over policy.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
Barbie was not the girl that Janice Amundson thought she'd be.For one thing, claims Amundson in a $200,000 federal lawsuit, the supposedly vintage doll worth $1,800 was nearly bald.Amundson, an avid Barbie collector from Red Deer, Alberta, Canada, who has amassed more than 300 of the shapely plastic dolls, contends that a Maryland woman sold her the rare Barbie with chunks of its hair missing."When she opened the box that was delivered in the mail, she found that the doll's hair had gotten brittle and was falling out," said Joseph W. Hovermill, a Baltimore lawyer representing Amundson and her husband in the lawsuit.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 11, 2003
Three series premiere tonight, and the best that can be said about them is that they offer a handy, one-night snapshot of what an overwhelmingly sorry lineup of new programs the networks are offering this fall. UPN's The Mullets is not just bad, it's maddeningly awful. Its depiction of working-class life through the knuckle-headed behavior of its two leading characters, brothers Dwayne (Michael Weaver) and Denny (David Hornsby) Mullet is television stereoptyping at its worst. Promotional materials circulated by UPN describe the brothers as "blue-collar, wrestling-loving, lighthearted, optimistic guys who sport the hairstyle that bears their surname - identical mullet haircuts."
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
Barbie was not the girl that Janice Amundson thought she'd be.For one thing, claims Amundson in a $200,000 federal lawsuit, the supposedly vintage doll worth $1,800 was nearly bald.Amundson, an avid Barbie collector from Red Deer, Alberta, Canada, who has amassed more than 300 of the shapely plastic dolls, contends that a Maryland woman sold her the rare Barbie with chunks of its hair missing."When she opened the box that was delivered in the mail, she found that the doll's hair had gotten brittle and was falling out," said Joseph W. Hovermill, a Baltimore lawyer representing Amundson and her husband in the lawsuit.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1996
JUST HOURS ago, the Maryland General Assembly adjourned sine die. All that's left now until next January is the legal and fiscal hangover from the last 90-day binge.To many Marylanders, exactly what legislators do down there in Annapolis is a mystery. (In fact, to many who make their living in the capital, including some senators and delegates, it's a mystery.)Your correspondent was reminded of the former last week, when one political neophyte asked why a certain bill didn't pass this year.
NEWS
By Kiah Stokes | November 10, 1994
AS A YOUNG African-American girl growing up in northeast Baltimore, I often thought of myself as the oddball when it came to hair.Between the ages of 8 to 18, I felt that every day was a bad hair day for me because I had short hair that seemingly refused to grow. I envied the other girls -- including most of my African-American friends and relatives -- who had long locks. It didn't help that most of my female relatives have hair that grows like the sprouts on a Chia Pet.I often heard, "Kiah, hair isn't everything you know."
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