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NEWS
September 18, 2010
It is a truism , born in Hollywood westerns, that the good guys wear white hats. Now from New York comes word that the bad guys prefer Yankee caps. In the last 10 years more than 100 suspects or persons of interest in connection with serious crimes in New York wore Yankee apparel at the time of their crimes, arrests or arraignment. This report comes from The New York Times, the newspaper of record in the Yankees' hometown, which stated that when it came to clothing favored by the accused, "no other sports team comes close.
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NEWS
March 24, 2014
After reading your article about Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts' visit to Chicago to observe its crime-fighting strategy, I could only ask: "Are you kidding me?" ( "Baltimore Police look to Chicago for crime-fighting insight," March 19). In many ways Chicago has more of a crime problem than we do, and it is no more effective at improving it. Baltimore's mayor and police commissioner should look at cities that have turned their crime problems around or have consistently low crime rates.
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NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | March 12, 1991
Questions, comments and snide remarks for a Tuesday:Area police believe there may be an organized gang of bandits responsible for many of the armed robberies that have hit banks, groceries and fast-food places in the city and in Baltimore County these past few months.Police have made a couple of arrests -- including that of Sadiyq Abdullah Muhammed, 19, who was nabbed Saturday in Virginia -- but they do not believe they have captured any of the ringleaders.So this is where we've got to be careful.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | January 5, 2014
Clint Eastwood fans recall the popular shoot 'em up Western entitled "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. " The moniker fits an Obama-led Washington, circa 2014. Don't believe me? Check it out: The good Despite aggressive overselling of an economic recovery by Democrats, Republicans must recognize a number of positives on the economic front. Consumer spending has improved, and so have the markets. Unemployment has steadily (albeit too slowly) decreased to the "new normal" - around 7 percent.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | February 21, 1991
I am sure that in their personal lives, the good old boys and girls of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce are fine people -- loving and attentive parents, considerate neighbors, upstanding citizens.But in Annapolis this year, the good old boys and girls of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce have sided with the bad guys.Yesterday, for example, a legislative committee took testimony on a major civil rights bill introduced by Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg, D-City. The bill would enable victims of intentional employment discrimination to collect punitive and compensatory damages in civil court.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | August 4, 1993
People across the United States took to the streets last night to say: "We're not going to take it anymore." It was National Night Out in America.From inner city Baltimore, around the Beltway suburbs and down to the far southern reaches of Anne Arundel County and beyond, Marylanders took to the streets and turned on their porch lights.At 7 p.m. in Baltimore -- the moment the good guys vs. the bad guys event kicked off -- police sirens and blue lights ripped through the 400 block of N. Collington Ave.The eastside neighborhood is not unfamiliar with sirens and blue lights.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 5, 1995
The new James Bond movie ("Goldeneye") opens in a few weeks, and if the bad guys are as dim-witted as usual, Agent 007 has nothing to worry about.All I know is, if I were running SPECTRE, I'd start by giving my operatives one little piece of advice. Boys, I'd say, the minute you capture Bond, do yourselves a big favor: Shoot him.Don't toss him into a tank filled with man-eating sharks.Don't handcuff him to an atomic bomb with the timer set to go off in 10 minutes.Don't strap him to an operating table with a high-powered laser inching steadily toward his head.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | September 29, 2009
Jason Simons was the kind of cop whom bad guys opened up to. Simons, a detective with the Baltimore County Police Department until his death last week in an auto accident, had such an engaging way about him that he could extract information from people who might have been better off shutting up. "It got to the point that suspects would tell him things that would tank them afterwards," Lt. J.R. Brown, one of Simons' supervisors in the department's Towson...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Unprecedented international cooperation and the expulsion of more than 100 Iraqi diplomats around the world have prevented Saddam Hussein from delivering on his threat to wage a campaign of terror against America and its allies, U.S. officials believe.The expulsion of the diplomats and other Iraqi terrorist agents "clearly thwarted his operational capabilities," said one U.S. official. "We've been successful in getting the [suspect] Iraqis expelled, as well as general bad guys."
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1999
Memo to bad guys in James Bond movies: For the umpteenth time, if you get the drop on 007, just pull the trigger, OK?Forget about strapping him to a table and dismembering him with a powerful laser.Forget about handcuffing him to a nuclear bomb.Forget about tossing him into a shark tank.Forget about locking him in an airtight room and releasing deadly cyanide gas.Keep it simple, stupid. You're all packing heat -- use it!Don't you guys get it? Every time you try one of your exotic methods of eliminating Bond, the man wriggles out of it and comes back to haunt you.You people are what, 0-for-18 when it comes to getting rid of this guy?
NEWS
July 8, 2013
The 300 Man March, Baltimore's latest effort to rally against the worsening toll of killings that has hit the city this summer, turns out to have been inaptly named. Significantly more people than that are reported to have shown up - twice that many, by some estimates. They were people who are fed up with their communities being defined, their lives being dictated, by those who trade in violence and intimidation. It is widely known here that no matter how high Baltimore may climb on the list of America's most dangerous cities, that danger is largely confined to a handful of neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Hoping to get leads in a series of violent incidents that have occurred in West Baltimore, federal and local authorities announced the arrests of 24 people on drug-related charges after a months-long operation that included undercover work. Police said the operation was launched after a wave of violence in the area around the Franklin Square and Penrose neighborhoods, including the fatal shooting of a 32-year-old man at a barber shop and 10 non-fatal shootings. With agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and city prosecutors, police worked to build charges against those they believed were involved, including using undercover drug buys - which Deputy Commissioner John Skinner described as “one of the riskiest types of operations” police can use. In all, 24 people have been indicted in the case - Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts described them as “24 criminals that impacted the city of Baltimore, and will not do that any further.” As of Friday afternoon, only 10 had been arrested, and most had been released on bail.
NEWS
October 29, 2012
Has anyone else thought about what we would do if foreigners sent drones over our land to kill some bad guys but ended up killing lots of innocent people? Any patriot would naturally see that as unacceptable and retaliate any way we could. This no-brainer leads me to think that the U.S. is deliberately creating enemies to justify wars for oil and pipelines. The military-industrial complex, which President Dwight Eisenhower warned us against, is forcing us into permanent war by funding politicians.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | August 1, 2012
With each passing day, we live in a more and more disposable society. Be it food, jobs, relationships, or even sadly, horrific tragedies which deflate our national spirit. If we want to be honest in this disposable society we now all inhabit, then we will admit that the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., and the unimaginable and unbearable grief it produced for the victims and families is already fading from our collective conscious. Both because that is how our short-attention-span minds have been programmed to operate and because for much of the media, it's yesterday's news.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Over the weekend, Baltimore Sun magazine published excerpts from a Q&A with Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III. After five years of talking to bad guys with guns, features editor Sam Sessa got him to dish on some more light-hearted topics such as his favorite music and his solo hike on the Appalachian Trail. You can read that interview here .  But Sam and the outgoing commissioner also talked the war on drugs, "The Wire," and his decision to retire. Here's what was left on the cutting room floor: You were a drug cop. What do you think about the push to decriminalize marijuana?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 18, 2012
During a stroll Thursday night from Little Italy to Harborplace, I bought jelly beans in The Best of Luck candy store, listened to a sidewalk trumpeter play the blues, noted several dead lights that left unappealing darkness along Pratt Street, and watched a Baltimore police officer train his flashlight into cars approaching the stop at Pratt and South, apparently looking for anyone not wearing a seat belt. He was the first cop I saw, and I guess his duty was in the cause of public safety, but I'd much rather have seen the man on foot patrol, strolling the sidewalks and Inner Harbor promenade with the rest of us. His presence certainly would have been appreciated 30 minutes later, when a squadron of eight skinny boys on bicycles decided to pop wheelies and fly along the brick walkway between the World Trade Center and the National Aquarium, oblivious (or maybe not)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 3, 2007
After conquering Doc Ock and the Green Goblin in the first two films, and fighting the New Goblin and that "human sandpile" the Sandman in the first hour of this film, a beleaguered Spider-Man hauls himself to a perch high over Manhattan and asks, wearily, "Where do all these guys come from?" It's the biggest laugh line in the movie. But before long audiences are asking, "Where do all these guys come from? And why?" Spider-Man 3 (Sony) Starring Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst, James Franco, Thomas Haden Church, Topher Grace, Bryce Dallas Howard.
FEATURES
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1998
With the Cold War warmed, the Soviet Union dismantled and KGB agents out of vogue (and out of jobs), moviemakers have replaced Russia -- and Nazis and mobsters, too -- with a more modern genre of big-screen evil: the techno-spy.And in its search for new varieties of wiretapping, computer-hacking bad guys, Hollywood has aimed its cameras at the National Security Agency, the nation's super-secret eavesdropping and code-breaking organization at Fort Meade.It began five years ago with the movie "Sneakers," in which Robert Redford's crew of computer hackers steals a code-cracking device that can break into any computer on Earth.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
If the "stand your ground" laws are so bad for the country, as you say in your editorial, why is the homicide rate in Miami and other Florida cities so much less than in Baltimore ("A chance for justice," April 13). More than twice as many people, many of them black youths, are killed each year in Baltimore than in Miami. Where is the outrage? Letting only the bad guys have guns does not seem to work. William Vail, Glen Burnie
NEWS
October 29, 2011
I don't think my visionary fellow letter writer who wants homecoming soldiers to police the U.S.- Mexico border has thought things through very clearly ("Put Iraq veterans to work on the U.S.-Mexico border," Oct. 26). Soldiers are trained to kill bad guys, not do what the border patrol does now, which is apprehending non-citizens, perhaps rehydrating them and then sending them home with as little fuss as possible. He mentions that the U.S. military could be charged with stemming the flow of drugs as well as illegal immigrants.
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