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By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | February 21, 1991
Insurance representatives came out en masse against to a bill that would allow policyholders to sue insurance companies for bad faith if there's a conflict over payment of a claim."
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By Jonah Goldberg | May 13, 2013
"Was it because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night and decided they'd go kill some Americans? What difference -- at this point, what difference does it make?" That was how then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton famously brushed off the question of when she knew that the attacks on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11 that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans were, in fact, a terrorist assault and not a "protest" of an anti-Islam video that got out of hand.
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NEWS
February 14, 1997
HERE WE GO AGAIN. The state's trial lawyers once more are attempting to punish "deep-pocket" insurance companies who fail to pay claims on time or who act in "bad faith" by unreasonably denying a customer's claim. If the lawyers succeed in Annapolis, the result could be fat fees for them and their clients -- and a rise in insurances premiums for the rest of us.Under their bill, not only would insurance companies have to pay up for acting in bad faith, but they would also have to pay treble damages.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | April 19, 2012
It was that sage of Springfield, Bart Simpson, a notoriously bad example for school children everywhere, who spoke the words that seem to have become an unofficial motto of Harford County Public Schools: The only bad excuse is no excuse. Such a sentiment may be perfectly fine for a mischievous cartoon character, but in the world of adults who are not cartoons, there's no excuse for making excuses when things go wrong. What's called for is owning up to miscalculations, doing what it takes to make things right, learning from past mistakes and, above all, doing what you say you're going to do. Too often this isn't what happens when the leaders of Harford County Public Schools are put in a tight situation, and this is glaringly true in the case recently decided by the Maryland Public School Labor Relations Board, which ruled that the Harford County Board of Education negotiated in bad faith with the local teachers union last year.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1995
USF&G Corp., stung by a $788,000 jury award in a bad-faith lawsuit in Alabama, has turned around and sued the savings and loan that filed the case against it.The Baltimore insurer last month lost the initial case filed by one of its customers, SouthFirst Bankshares, of Sylacauga, Ala. A jury determined that USF&G had acted in bad faith by failing to pay SouthFirst's claim for embezzlement losses by one of its employees. The jury awarded SouthFirst $688,000 in compensation, and $100,000 in punitive damages.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | April 19, 2012
It was that sage of Springfield, Bart Simpson, a notoriously bad example for school children everywhere, who spoke the words that seem to have become an unofficial motto of Harford County Public Schools: The only bad excuse is no excuse. Such a sentiment may be perfectly fine for a mischievous cartoon character, but in the world of adults who are not cartoons, there's no excuse for making excuses when things go wrong. What's called for is owning up to miscalculations, doing what it takes to make things right, learning from past mistakes and, above all, doing what you say you're going to do. Too often this isn't what happens when the leaders of Harford County Public Schools are put in a tight situation, and this is glaringly true in the case recently decided by the Maryland Public School Labor Relations Board, which ruled that the Harford County Board of Education negotiated in bad faith with the local teachers union last year.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | May 13, 2013
"Was it because of a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night and decided they'd go kill some Americans? What difference -- at this point, what difference does it make?" That was how then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton famously brushed off the question of when she knew that the attacks on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11 that killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans were, in fact, a terrorist assault and not a "protest" of an anti-Islam video that got out of hand.
NEWS
By The New York Times | April 17, 1991
SEVENTY-SEVEN years ago the U.S. Supreme Court began excluding illegally seized evidence from criminal trials. It reasoned wisely that the Constitution's ban on unreasonable searches would be meaningless if federal agents could profit by such illegal conduct.The exclusionary rule, later expanded to state court cases, has been a first line of defense for citizen privacy against unlawful police intrusions. But now the Bush administration wants to abolish the rule or at least riddle it with exceptions.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The concept seems so simple to Sen. John A. Pica Jr. that he can't understand why he has to keep coming back each year to fight for it:If an insurance company fails to pay claims when it should and acts "intentionally and wrongfully," a customer can sue the company and ask for "punitive" damages to say that kind of behavior won't be tolerated.That's the idea behind a "bad faith" bill the Baltimore Democrat presented to the Senate Finance Committee yesterday.If Mr. Pica can't understand why the bill continues to fail, he need look no further than the dozen or so lobbyists who have signed up to oppose the measure for their clients -- members of the insurance industry.
NEWS
By Larry S. Gibson | November 5, 1991
DOES Frank DeFilippo intentionally lie or does he just have unreliable sources? I have asked this question for years. DeFilippo's article, "Schmoke, Gibson rewrite the rules of political bossism" (Other Voices, Oct. 31), provides the answer.This article revealed a continued disregard for the facts which DeFilippo has demonstrated on previous occasions in his frequent attacks on the Schmoke administration and me. But this time he cannot hide behind unnamed sources.He made statements which he knew or should have known were untrue.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2002
A day after more than 100 teachers crowded the Carroll school board meeting in a show of disappointment and anger over their tentative contract agreement, school board President Susan W. Krebs shot back yesterday, saying it was too late for them to voice their opinions. Krebs said the contract offer was "more than fair." "To have all those people come [Wednesday] night after we have a signed tentative agreement amounts to bargaining in bad faith," she said yesterday. Krebs compared the teachers who showed up at the school board meeting to "a spoiled kid who wants both pieces of candy, can't have both and whines about it."
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
Frustrated that contract negotiations between Annapolis firefighters and the city have broken off, representatives from the firefighters union have begun courting city council members. Some council members attended a briefing last night by the union, which is seeking a shorter workweek that city officials have said they cannot afford. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer objected to the union's overtures with council members, saying the firefighters' representatives were engaging in "bad faith" negotiations by attempting to go around the city's designated negotiators.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - On his second day as head men's lacrosse coach at the University of Maryland, Dave Cottle smiled like a man who felt the storm subsiding. One day after he took over for the recently retired Dick Edell and was confronted by an entire team protesting his hiring, Cottle met individually with nearly two thirds of his new players and sounded like a coach scoring his first victory. With the exception of his chat with one player, Cottle termed all of his meetings as "good" or "terrific."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and John Rivera and Neal Thompson and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2001
Baltimore's religious leaders have forged a united front in opposing the first-ever energy tax proposed for the city's nonprofit organizations, and many plan to express their outrage tomorrow at City Hall. "We simply plan to tell the council, `If you vote in favor of this proposal, we consider it the first step toward ending your political future,'" said the Rev. Gregory B. Perkins, president of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, a group of 200 predominantly black clergy. He is organizing a 4 p.m. news conference outside City Hall.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
In the latest installment of the strange saga of Carnegie International Corp., the Hunt Valley telecommunications holding company -- whose stock has been suspended from trading for nearly six months -- has swapped charges of bad faith with the accounting firm that it recently fired.In a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, Carnegie explained why it dropped its accountant, Grant Thornton LLP of Chicago.Carnegie, whose subsidiaries sell services ranging from Internet access to voice-recognition software, said its firing of Grant Thornton on Sept.
NEWS
April 23, 1997
A HUGE MOVING van is marooned in front of Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art, blocked at both ends by cars bearing Russian diplomatic license plates. Inside the climate-controlled tractor trailer are ancient Russian czarist heirlooms. Meanwhile, jewels of the Romanov dynasty valued at more than $100 million have been in the Corcoran vault since the April 13 closing of an exhibit of imperial treasures that drew some 80,000 visitors.The cause of this strange standoff is the Russian government's sudden demand that the Romanov jewels' U.S. tour be interrupted and the treasures returned to Moscow, which will be celebrating its 850th anniversary later this year.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 1, 1994
JERUSALEM -- Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin warned yesterday that if the Palestine Liberation Organization reopened negotiations on a package of compromises, everything would be on the table and previous Israeli concessions would be withdrawn.Mr. Rabin said that a PLO rejection of the package worked out during intensive talks this week in Cairo, Egypt, would return the negotiations to their starting point."As long as there is no approval from [PLO headquarters in Tunis, Tunisia] . . . for the paper, which we view as a summing-up [of agreements]
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1995
USF&G Corp., stung by a $788,000 jury award in a bad-faith lawsuit in Alabama, has turned around and sued the savings and loan that filed the case against it.The Baltimore insurer last month lost the initial case filed by one of its customers, SouthFirst Bankshares, of Sylacauga, Ala. A jury determined that USF&G had acted in bad faith by failing to pay SouthFirst's claim for embezzlement losses by one of its employees.The jury awarded SouthFirst $688,000 in compensation, and $100,000 in punitive damages.
NEWS
February 14, 1997
HERE WE GO AGAIN. The state's trial lawyers once more are attempting to punish "deep-pocket" insurance companies who fail to pay claims on time or who act in "bad faith" by unreasonably denying a customer's claim. If the lawyers succeed in Annapolis, the result could be fat fees for them and their clients -- and a rise in insurances premiums for the rest of us.Under their bill, not only would insurance companies have to pay up for acting in bad faith, but they would also have to pay treble damages.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1995
USF&G Corp., stung by a $788,000 jury award in a bad-faith lawsuit in Alabama, has turned around and sued the savings and loan that filed the case against it.The Baltimore insurer last month lost the initial case filed by one of its customers, SouthFirst Bankshares, of Sylacauga, Ala. A jury determined that USF&G had acted in bad faith by failing to pay SouthFirst's claim for embezzlement losses by one of its employees. The jury awarded SouthFirst $688,000 in compensation, and $100,000 in punitive damages.
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