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EXPLORE
July 20, 2012
In response to the reader who was so "mystified" by your support of the coming of Wegmans to our area ("More coverage needed of neighborhood stores," June 28): The stores she lauds had no interest in accommodating residents of Wilde Lake when the plans for the village center were in the making, in spite of the potential for business the additional housing would provide. (Bad business decision?) They have had a captive "audience" in the village centers for years. Now that we have a choice, being "loyal" to some of them who have horrendous markups (David's and Supersaver)
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NEWS
September 9, 2014
The Ravens insist they had not seen the video taken by an Atlantic City casino elevator security camera showing Ray Rice knock out his then-fiancée, now wife, Janay Palmer, until it was posted Monday morning by the website tmz.com. Ditto the National Football League. Thus, we are expected to believe, these two organizations were just as shocked and appalled as the general public at the sight of the 206-pound running back punching Ms. Palmer with his left fist so forcefully that it knocked her off her feet, into the handrail at the side of the elevator they were riding, and then to the floor.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | July 9, 2013
Standing inside Vance Shoe Repair off Route 40 in Ellicott City, it's easy to see it is not your ordinary small business. While the overflowing shop space - evidence of the business' success - is what you notice first, it's the friendly environment, cultivated by owner Paul McMickings, that stays with you. McMickings died of cancer June 30 at age 63. "Paul was here to help," said regular customer Maggie Surette. "Paul didn't charge what other shoe shops charge. He would take in anything and would help anybody," Surette said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Six months after Baltimore pulled its speed and red light cameras offline because of mistakes, officials say the city's vendor still isn't ready to begin issuing tickets — and no one can say when the program will resume. The city counts on the cameras both to enforce safe-driving laws and to generate millions of dollars in revenue. The continued delay and uncertainty are causing some to question whether Baltimore's new vendor, Brekford Corp. of Anne Arundel County, is up to the task.
NEWS
June 5, 2005
Last week's topic: An Ellicott City woman recently was given approval to run a one-chair beauty parlor out of her home despite the opposition of many residents in her Centennial neighborhood. Some believe small service businesses are compatible in residential neighborhoods, while others believe they are disruptive and hurt property values. To an entrepreneur, much good luck I have been a householder in the Centennial area for over 20 years, and in that time I have marveled at the ingenuity of those of my neighbors who have been able to make a little extra money, if not their livelihoods, from businesses operated from their homes.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 2, 2012
Walmart is proposing to relocate their Abingdon store in Constant Friendship Business Park to near Bel Air at the corner of Emmorton Road (route 924) and Plumtree Road. One of the reasons that has been put forth is a restriction on the land they own at Abingdon does not allow them to sell groceries. A search of the Walmart deeds back to about 1974 did not turn up such a restriction; however, another property in the business park does carry a no-grocery restriction but it is located across Constant Friendship Blvd from Walmart and is south of Arundel Court.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Six months after Baltimore pulled its speed and red light cameras offline because of mistakes, officials say the city's vendor still isn't ready to begin issuing tickets — and no one can say when the program will resume. The city counts on the cameras both to enforce safe-driving laws and to generate millions of dollars in revenue. The continued delay and uncertainty are causing some to question whether Baltimore's new vendor, Brekford Corp. of Anne Arundel County, is up to the task.
NEWS
April 25, 2010
Marylanders would have every right to be confused by the most recent figures from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. For years they've been hearing from business groups and conservatives that the Old Line State seems hell bent on killing jobs. If it's not a complaint about environmental or labor regulations, it's a cry that excessive taxes of one kind or another would drive all businesses across the border to Virginia. The governor's feud with Constellation Energy would scare off businesses from relocating here; corporate taxes and millionaires taxes would send existing companies packing; and cigarette taxes would ensure that we have no convenience stores within an hour's drive of the state line.
NEWS
By Pete Horrigan | February 23, 2012
Instead of blindly raising the cost of gasoline and diesel to Maryland consumers, now is the time to rethink how the more than $3 billion spent yearly on transportation needs in Maryland are funded. We should not allow government to squeeze more money out of Marylanders' pockets without a thorough review of how the funds are administered and utilized. Motorist-paid gas taxes and vehicle fees are by far the largest source of transportation funding for both highways and mass transit.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 22, 1995
HAVRE DE GRACE -- In the 1960s, as a young reporter assigned to Prince George's County, I used to drive from Upper Marlboro across the Patuxent River into Anne Arundel County a couple of times a week for what would now be called an ''entertainment experience'' -- lunch, and the chance to play the slot machines.These had been legal in Anne Arundel, Charles, St. Mary's and Calvert Counties since the 1940s, and although playing them was a novelty for me, it wasn't a big deal. There were quarter machines and nickel machines.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | July 9, 2013
Standing inside Vance Shoe Repair off Route 40 in Ellicott City, it's easy to see it is not your ordinary small business. While the overflowing shop space - evidence of the business' success - is what you notice first, it's the friendly environment, cultivated by owner Paul McMickings, that stays with you. McMickings died of cancer June 30 at age 63. "Paul was here to help," said regular customer Maggie Surette. "Paul didn't charge what other shoe shops charge. He would take in anything and would help anybody," Surette said.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | February 5, 2013
The Justice Department is accusing Standard & Poor's of defrauding investors with optimistic ratings of mortgage-backed securities and derivatives prior to the financial crisis. While investors are entitled to answers about those conflicts, compensation and reforms, Attorney General Eric Holder and President Barack Obama, by singling out S&P instead of other bond raters, appear to be engaging in political vengeance and put freedom of speech at risk. In 2011, S&P, Moody's and Fitch were accused by a Senate committee of giving overly rosy ratings on mortgage-backed securities in the years prior to the financial meltdown of 2008 and then contributing to the severity of the crisis by hastily downgrading hundreds of securities after the housing bubble burst.
NEWS
By Patrick Boyle | February 4, 2013
Over the past 103 years, America's churches have built the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) into the nation's most successful youth group - which makes it remarkable that the BSA stands ready to let gays join Scouting, thus publicly renouncing the wishes of some of its oldest and dearest friends. A proposal to let the local organizations that run Scout units decide whether to accept homosexual boys and leaders - to be voted on by the BSA board of directors this week - is monumental not only for Scouting but for what it says about the state of gay rights in America.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 2, 2012
Walmart is proposing to relocate their Abingdon store in Constant Friendship Business Park to near Bel Air at the corner of Emmorton Road (route 924) and Plumtree Road. One of the reasons that has been put forth is a restriction on the land they own at Abingdon does not allow them to sell groceries. A search of the Walmart deeds back to about 1974 did not turn up such a restriction; however, another property in the business park does carry a no-grocery restriction but it is located across Constant Friendship Blvd from Walmart and is south of Arundel Court.
EXPLORE
July 20, 2012
In response to the reader who was so "mystified" by your support of the coming of Wegmans to our area ("More coverage needed of neighborhood stores," June 28): The stores she lauds had no interest in accommodating residents of Wilde Lake when the plans for the village center were in the making, in spite of the potential for business the additional housing would provide. (Bad business decision?) They have had a captive "audience" in the village centers for years. Now that we have a choice, being "loyal" to some of them who have horrendous markups (David's and Supersaver)
NEWS
By Pete Horrigan | February 23, 2012
Instead of blindly raising the cost of gasoline and diesel to Maryland consumers, now is the time to rethink how the more than $3 billion spent yearly on transportation needs in Maryland are funded. We should not allow government to squeeze more money out of Marylanders' pockets without a thorough review of how the funds are administered and utilized. Motorist-paid gas taxes and vehicle fees are by far the largest source of transportation funding for both highways and mass transit.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER | January 16, 1991
Half a world away, hundreds of thousands of Americans (and even greater numbers of Iraqis, other Arabs, Israelis and Europeans) are spending some of the loneliest and longest nights of their young lives.Here, millions of relatives and friends have, in recent days, been slapped with the sobering reality that their loved ones may be putting their lives on the line.Any "G.I. Joe" feelings of boisterous adventure have been put away; war is not a child's fantasy but an adult's nightmare.Against such a backdrop, "business as usual" is a ludicrous concept.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
The development interests were represented only in effigy when the environmental types gathered at the National Geographic Society in Washington the other day. There he was, a friendly looking guy in a tweed jacket and yellow hard hat, grasping in his left hand a long roll of paper. More big plans, no doubt.He was smiling, but silent. And who could blame him?Out in the Explorer's Hall Museum they were doing the press preview show for the opening of "Chesapeake Changes," a six-month exhibit about North America's largest estuary that opened yesterday at 17th and M streets N.W. in Washington.
NEWS
By Steve Walters | June 14, 2010
When businesses fail, we profs show up like buzzards at roadkill. It's not that we enjoy others' suffering; our hope is to glean insights that might keep our students from producing the next Lehman Brothers, General Motors, or … Baltimore Orioles. True, the O's aren't bankrupt, and they're not very economically important. The value of the entire U.S. sports industry is less than the federal government spent to bail out AIG a couple of years ago. But sports data are detailed and public, so it's easy to learn from them — and because we care passionately about our sports teams, the lessons learned might actually stick.
NEWS
April 25, 2010
Marylanders would have every right to be confused by the most recent figures from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. For years they've been hearing from business groups and conservatives that the Old Line State seems hell bent on killing jobs. If it's not a complaint about environmental or labor regulations, it's a cry that excessive taxes of one kind or another would drive all businesses across the border to Virginia. The governor's feud with Constellation Energy would scare off businesses from relocating here; corporate taxes and millionaires taxes would send existing companies packing; and cigarette taxes would ensure that we have no convenience stores within an hour's drive of the state line.
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