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Bad Blood

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NEWS
May 25, 1991
Though dissimilar in character and demographics, Howard and Prince George's counties have hit upon similar solutions to a common problem: bad blood between the local police and the community.In Howard, where the police force has been accused of using undue force in dealing with teen-agers, officers are being dispatched to county high schools to walk the halls and give occasional talks on law enforcement. Prince George's, which is still trying to escape a residual image of a brutal and biased department, has opened eight satellite offices in apartment complexes and churches in drug-infested neighborhoods.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Washington College and 2013 national champion Stevenson checked, bruised, and battered each other in a thrilling 60-minute NCAA tournament quarterfinal on Wednesday night at Mustang Stadium in Owings Mills decided by a Jim Cusick goal with 22.5 seconds left to lift the visiting Shoremen to a 12-11 decision. There were some verbal whacks after the game, too. In his postgame interview with media, Stevenson coach Paul Cantabene expressed his displeasure with comments made by Washington College coach Jeff Shirk in an online article written by Jac Coyne for Lacrosse Magazine.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1996
Perhaps it was inevitable -- a dramatic odd-man-out duel between two longtime railroad rivals over Conrail, the jewel of the Northeast.The spoils are indeed rich. If CSX or Norfolk Southern succeeds in swallowing the 11,000-mile Conrail system whole, it would become the indisputable rail power of the East, dwarfing its competitor and locking up the lucrative Northeast."The stakes are high. The stakes are real high," acknowledged Thomas E. Hoppin, vice president of communications for Rich--mond-based CSX Corp.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
For those lucky enough to be in attendance for the Ravens-San Francisco 49ers joint practices in August, it's easy to see the benefits of such an arrangement. Even during practices, the subplots will be endless and certainly go beyond the presence of two head-coaching brothers on the same field. How comfortable will the 49ers be practicing at a facility where there are ever-present reminders of their 34-31 loss to the Ravens in Super Bowl XLVII? Will there be bad blood between two teams that pride themselves on playing a physical style?
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2001
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - The Ravens' Monday Night Football debut will mark the final act of their fiercest divisional rivalry. After the likely Dennis Miller rant about how he hasn't encountered so much bad blood since the Hatfields and McCoys, the Ravens (5-3) will rumble with the Tennessee Titans (3-4) at 9 tonight, likely for the last time as AFC Central foes. Next year's league-wide realignment will split up this bitter feud, which has been spiced by images of two-by-fours, banshees, spears and a stadium foreclosure.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | February 28, 1992
Whether yesterday's trade between the Orioles and San Diego Padres is one that helps both teams remains to be seen.But Craig Worthington is convinced it will help the two players affected the most -- himself and former teammate Leo Gomez.The two have been tracking each other through the Orioles' system for the last five years -- Worthington leading the way, and Gomez following in his footsteps. At each stop -- Hagerstown, Rochester and, finally, Baltimore -- Gomez was compared to Worthington, and, in the end, vice versa.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
For those lucky enough to be in attendance for the Ravens-San Francisco 49ers joint practices in August, it's easy to see the benefits of such an arrangement. Even during practices, the subplots will be endless and certainly go beyond the presence of two head-coaching brothers on the same field. How comfortable will the 49ers be practicing at a facility where there are ever-present reminders of their 34-31 loss to the Ravens in Super Bowl XLVII? Will there be bad blood between two teams that pride themselves on playing a physical style?
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 9, 1992
As far as we know, Arthur Ashe didn't sleep with thousands of women.He didn't use drugs with needles.He isn't gay.And yet he has AIDS.That's the first thing to know about this story. Arthur Ashe might as well be Kimberly Bergalis. He is a victim of caprice. He apparently got a bad blood transfusion, and the bad blood gave him HIV, and the HIV gave him AIDS.So, we don't get a morality play this time. No one gets to point fingers. Arthur Ashe was unlucky, and because he was unlucky, he has contracted a fatal disease.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | December 19, 1993
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- The Dallas Cowboys' full-scale assault on the NFL continued with vigor here yesterday.There were a few acrobatic defensive plays, a spectacular catch or two and more than a little bad blood.The bad blood surfaced after the Cowboys punished the New York Jets, 28-7, at Giants Stadium to clinch a playoff berth.Sparks flew as Cowboys coach Jimmy Johnson and Jets coach Bruce Coslet walked through the tunnel under the stadium to their respective locker rooms. Johnson, walking slightly ahead of Coslet, flailed his arms and gestured animatedly, even as Dallas owner Jerry Jones tried to calm him down.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1997
NEW YORK -- It isn't easy being David Wells right now. Wells can't walk onto the field at Yankee Stadium without being reminded about the man he replaced in the New York Yankees' && starting rotation."
SPORTS
By George Diaz, Tribune Newspapers | June 29, 2011
It seems that NASCAR can have an unapologetic feud without the contentious crossfire (see Richard Childress/Kyle Busch ). Tony Stewart and Brian Vickers did a little bumping and grinding at Sonoma last weekend, and while it probably wasn't a very good idea from a practical standpoint — Stewart is precariously on the bubble trying to qualify for the Chase; Vickers needs a ride for next season — you have to admire their unabashed style...
SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY and JAMISON HENSLEY,SUN REPORTER | October 31, 2005
The Ravens' smash-mouth rivalry with the Pittsburgh Steelers has been defined by two teams running the ball, not two teams running in opposite directions. Barring an unexpected turn of events tonight, it won't be hard for a national television audience to tell which team is on the verge of making a power play in the AFC North and which one is on the verge of chaos. The Steelers (4-2) are coming off a statement game, one in which they roughed up the division-leading Cincinnati Bengals.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER | October 19, 2003
The Maryland Racing Commission meeting on Tuesday at Laurel Park was quite a spectacle. Trainers and horsemen were mad about having to move from Pimlico or having their stalls cut or eliminated at Laurel and Bowie. The horsemen's leadership was mad at Tom McDonough, the new, governor-appointed chairman of the commission, for his reluctance to let the horsemen speak. McDonough accused fellow commissioner John Franzone, a constant critic of the Maryland Jockey Club, of grandstanding. And when Alvin Akman, a new commissioner also appointed by the governor, delivered his obscenity-filled diatribe seemingly attacking the horsemen for their accusations of discrimination, the world stopped.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2003
They hit town like a pair of action-movie heroes, the mayor in the black sleeveless muscle shirt and the barrel-chested New York cop. They put the hurt on the bad guys together and helped each other gain fame by knocking down Baltimore's crime rate. Once friends and occasional drinking companions, now Mayor Martin O'Malley and his former police commissioner, Edward T. Norris, aren't even speaking. They haven't said a word to each other in four months, since Norris abruptly left after a financial scandal - and sharp words - to join O'Malley's political nemesis, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., and become the state police superintendent.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2001
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - The Ravens' Monday Night Football debut will mark the final act of their fiercest divisional rivalry. After the likely Dennis Miller rant about how he hasn't encountered so much bad blood since the Hatfields and McCoys, the Ravens (5-3) will rumble with the Tennessee Titans (3-4) at 9 tonight, likely for the last time as AFC Central foes. Next year's league-wide realignment will split up this bitter feud, which has been spiced by images of two-by-fours, banshees, spears and a stadium foreclosure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 29, 2000
Anne Rice, quite famously, has written 22 novels, the most recent reaching shops this week. I had never read one. Often, I puzzle about what brings millions of readers to books I think of as commodity fiction -- work that is virtually universally ignored by book reviewers. That curiosity brought me to Ms. Rice's "Merrick" (Knopf, 307 pages, $26.95). I wish I could report its secret, with anything like confidence. It seemed to me to have all the literary artfulness, but not as much imagination, as a supermarket Halloween-special advertisement.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
The issues were loyalty and convenience when Mike Pringle rolled into Baltimore last June in an agitated state of mind.The loyalty of the Sacramento Gold Miners was in question; Pringle's convenience was in doubt.That was 3 1/2 months and one very curious trade ago. Today, the deal that brought the 26-year-old running back to Baltimore's Canadian Football League team for "future considerations" looks indeed like a gold mine to Pringle and the CFLs.Halfway through the season, Pringle is second in the league in rushing yards with 759, and is one of the prime reasons the CFLs (6-3)
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mike Preston contributed to this article | September 19, 1998
Corey Harris takes no offense at being called a journeyman. Instead, he jokes about his resume, which includes five NFL stops and several position changes."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
ST. LOUIS - It didn't take long for the National League Championship Series to get nasty. New York Mets general manager Steve Phillips sparked an angry response from St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony La Russa when he accused reliever Mike James of hitting shortstop Mike Bordick in the ninth inning of Game 1. Bordick was hit on the right thumb by a pitch after Mets outfielder Jay Payton hit the second home run of the inning off James. Bordick was removed from the game and was not in the starting lineup for Game 2 last night.
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