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By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- For the first time, the entire DNA sequence of a free-living organism has been deciphered, displaying an entire set of the genes needed for life, two scientists announced Wednesday night.The sequence is a chain of 1,830,121 DNA bases, the chemical units of the genetic code, which constitute the full genetic data base of a bacterium, Hemophilus influenzae.The result, announced at a meeting of the American Society for Microbiology here, is a personal triumph for Dr. J. Craig Venter, the scientist who led the sequencing work.
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By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
When Charlie Schneider came back one day in June after being out fishing near his Tilghman Island home, he noticed he was getting chills. His left ankle itched and got worse and worse through the evening. It eventually started to throb a bit, and he couldn't sleep. At 2 a.m., he asked his wife to get an ice pack before discovering that his ankle had swollen to twice its normal size. He didn't know what had caused the reaction, but his decision to go straight to the hospital ultimately helped save his legs - and his life.
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SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
When Charlie Schneider came back one day in June after being out fishing near his Tilghman Island home, he noticed he was getting chills. His left ankle itched and got worse and worse through the evening. It eventually started to throb a bit, and he couldn't sleep. At 2 a.m., he asked his wife to get an ice pack before discovering that his ankle had swollen to twice its normal size. He didn't know what had caused the reaction, but his decision to go straight to the hospital ultimately helped save his legs - and his life.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
Imagine having a virtually limitless supply of clean, renewable fuel to run our cars and trucks, a fuel produced from something as noxious and seemingly useless as pond scum. Fantastic as that may sound, it's no pipe dream to Algenol Biofuels. The three-year-old company aims to make ethanol with blue-green algae, by feeding it a steady diet of carbon dioxide and farm animal waste. A dark horse in a crowded field vying to develop a new generation of biofuels, Algenol is based in Florida, but its research arm is in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
Scientists unraveling the story of mankind's ancient migrations have enlisted the help of an unlikely historian: an ulcer-causing bacterium that lives in the gut. An international research team reports in Science that the S-shaped bacterium Helicobacter pylori, best known for its miserable role in peptic ulcers and stomach cancer, may also harbor clues to human whereabouts over the centuries. Half the population of the planet may be infected with the bug, which is thought to be passed by contact from mother to child during infancy.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 1, 1991
For the first time, scientists have found strong evidence that some types of cancer may be caused by bacteria.Stanford University researchers reported in today's edition of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that virtually all their patients with the most common type of stomach cancer are infected with a bacterium that has previously been linked to inflammation of the stomach and ulcers -- strong evidence that the infectious agent plays a role...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1998
ROCKVILLE -- In a tour de force of computer-aided biology, scientists have decoded the full genetic instructions of the bacterium that causes ulcers and other stomach disease and have figured out many of its strategies.The advance is likely to lend new impetus to research on the bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, which is a leading cause of human illness. The microbe is thought to live in almost half the world's people, though usually without causing disease. In the United States it is found in 30 percent of adults and more than half of the people over 65, with a prevalence in lower socioeconomic groups.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2002
Frances L. Pittman waited a year for her lung. She remembers feeling elated when she got a phone call at dawn three years ago and learned that an organ donor had given her a chance to beat her progressive lung disease. Her husband, Marshall, floored their Buick LeSabre across the city to Johns Hopkins Hospital, then held her hand as orderlies wheeled her into the operating room. After the lung transplant was completed, she awoke and scribbled on a pad to her husband: "It's over. I love you."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 20, 2002
ALBANY, N.Y. - Listeria microbes have killed seven people in New York and infected at least 21 others since July, according to the state Health Department. Health officials are warning the public about the bacterium, which can be transmitted by contaminated food, and poses the greatest risk to newborns, children, pregnant women, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems. Only 10 of the cases, including eight in New York City, have so far been linked to a national outbreak of the illness, which has prompted an investigation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta into a possible food source for the potentially fatal bacterium.
NEWS
By Natalie Angier and Natalie Angier,New York Times News Service | March 18, 1993
Flouting the scientific canon that all bacteria are microscopic, researchers have discovered a strain so huge that it can be seen with the naked eye.The single-celled organism, plucked from the bowels of an Australian fish, is about the size of a hyphen in a newspaper, making it by far the largest bacterium ever detected.In measuring more than one-fiftieth of an inch in length and possessing a volume a million times that of the common E. coli microbe, the newly discovered bacterium seems to defy laws of biology that limit how big a simple bacterial cell can grow.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Reporter | May 21, 2007
It sounds like some medieval baby-killer that must have disappeared when husbands first began boiling water as their wives went into labor. But 25 percent of pregnant women in the United States carry a common, potentially deadly bacterium called group B streptococcus (or GBS) that can infect their babies during childbirth or soon after. Although doctors frequently administer antibiotics during labor to prevent them, GBS infections kill or injure several thousand babies each year - within hours or weeks of their birth.
NEWS
By SCOTT GOLD and SCOTT GOLD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 2006
METAIRIE, La. -- The question quietly circulating here is whether Legionnaires' disease is spreading in the battered refuse left by Hurricane Katrina. Some New Orleans-area doctors are saying the bacterium that can lead to the disease, a severe and stubborn form of pneumonia, might be growing in the soggy remains of buildings flooded after the hurricane. But some experts question whether the bacterium can grow in that environment, and state officials insist that there is no public health threat.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2006
Sixteen-year-old Serena Fasano, a junior at Glenelg High School, has been awarded a patent for a protein that she discovered - one that may someday help fight one of the world's deadliest diseases. "It's phenomenal," said Kendall Morton, the science team leader at Glenelg. "I'm very happy for her." Fasano will get to name the protein, she said, but she is not allowed to call it Serena, or to name it after her friends, as some have half-seriously requested. Instead, it will need a scientific name indicating it is a probiotic - a good protein.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 25, 2005
LIVERMORE, Calif. -- The rare bacterium that caused the massive infection that killed 18-year-old Holly Patterson of Livermore in 2003 has been linked to all four California women who died after taking the RU-486 abortion pill. The recent finding has led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to plan a scientific meeting to discuss what many view as a medical mystery, FDA spokeswoman Julie Zawisza confirmed. "We will further explore the issues and outstanding questions we don't have answers to right now," she said.
NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 1, 2003
Scientists are working to perfect a "superbug" to help clean up toxic wastes at thousands of radioactive sites worldwide. The mighty microbe - nicknamed "Conan the Bacterium" - combines the genes of two bacteria to perform a job neither could do on its own. The composite creature "can live quite happily in an environment with 1 million times the radiation a human cell could tolerate," Department of Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham said at a news conference...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
Nobody celebrates when human activity drives a species of whale or songbird toward extinction. We see those losses as threats to the biological diversity that preserves our own well-being. But plenty of people are cheering as Helicobacter pylori vanishes from the teeming ecosystem where it has lived for thousands of years. H. pylori is a squid-shaped bacterium that lurks in the human stomach, and scientists have discovered that it can play a key role in the development of gastric ulcers and stomach cancer - a malignancy that killed more than 12,000 Americans in 1999.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 25, 2005
LIVERMORE, Calif. -- The rare bacterium that caused the massive infection that killed 18-year-old Holly Patterson of Livermore in 2003 has been linked to all four California women who died after taking the RU-486 abortion pill. The recent finding has led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to plan a scientific meeting to discuss what many view as a medical mystery, FDA spokeswoman Julie Zawisza confirmed. "We will further explore the issues and outstanding questions we don't have answers to right now," she said.
NEWS
July 15, 1999
PEOPLE sometimes can catch diseases in hospitals. It appears that at least five people, three of whom died, may have contracted Legionnaires' disease at Harford Memorial Hospital. At least one family believes hospital officials were not forthcoming about the source of their relative's fatal disease.Outbreaks of the disease, caused by the Legionella bacterium, are more common than generally recognized. The bacteria grow in water and are present in water systems, air conditioners and whirlpools.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2003
Scientists unraveling the story of mankind's ancient migrations have enlisted the help of an unlikely historian: an ulcer-causing bacterium that lives in the gut. An international research team reports in Science that the S-shaped bacterium Helicobacter pylori, best known for its miserable role in peptic ulcers and stomach cancer, may also harbor clues to human whereabouts over the centuries. Half the population of the planet may be infected with the bug, which is thought to be passed by contact from mother to child during infancy.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 17, 2002
PEOPLE ALWAYS ask me: How come the newspaper prints so much bad news? How come the front page always has negative headlines like: "Freak Espresso Machine Explosion Destroys Crowded Starbucks?" Why don't we print stories with a positive slant, like: "Destroyed Starbucks Was Popular Gathering Place for Lawyers?" Well, OK, then. You want good news? We got yer good news right here, starting with this: Exciting Advance in Livestock Flatulence As you know if you have ever stood outdoors in the Midwest, cows give off methane gas. We don't know why. Maybe they're bored.
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