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NEWS
March 7, 2013
Federal health officials warned this week that the nation's hospitals and nursing homes are increasingly at risk from deadly new strains of drug-resistant bacteria that can't be treated with even the strongest antibiotics. So far, the infections have been confined to a small number of the sickest patients in hospital wards, but authorities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say there is only a "limited window of opportunity" to halt the spread of these "nightmare bacteria" into the wider population.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Families and roommates share plenty — food, bathrooms, dishes. A study published Thursday adds a less visible but ubiquitous item to the list: bacteria. Households carry a common community of bacteria, populating surfaces such as doorknobs, counters and floors, and shared by humans and pets alike, the study found. It travels with us like another member of the family and quickly takes over new environments, such as a new home or even a hotel room, with a distinct signature like fingerprints.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Anne Arundel County health officials are warning people to avoid swimming at three local beaches following two straight weeks of high bacteria readings. Signs will be posted to warn people not to swim or have other direct water contact at Beverly Beach along the Chesapeake Bay near Mayo, at Londontown's Arundel Road Beach on the South River in Edgewater and at Upper Magothy Beach on the Magothy River in Severna Park. Anyone who does come in contact with the water in those areas should wash well in warm, soapy water.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Department of Health has advised against swimming and other water recreation at Lake Ogleton Clubhouse Pier in Annapolis after high levels of bacteria were detected this week. Water samples collected on June 9 and June 11 exceeded EPA standards for bacteria, according to the health department. Signs have been posted in the area and anyone coming in contact with the water is advised to wash with soap and water immediately. Signs have been posted in the area as a warning, and the health department plans to test the waters again on Monday.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Department of Health has advised against swimming and other water recreation at Lake Ogleton Clubhouse Pier in Annapolis after high levels of bacteria were detected this week. Water samples collected on June 9 and June 11 exceeded EPA standards for bacteria, according to the health department. Signs have been posted in the area and anyone coming in contact with the water is advised to wash with soap and water immediately. Signs have been posted in the area as a warning, and the health department plans to test the waters again on Monday.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
High temperatures and pollution have made conditions ripe for a potentially dangerous bacteria carried in Chesapeake Bay waters, leading state and local health officials to warn swimmers, fishermen and shellfish eaters to take precautions. The naturally occurring bacteria, vibrio, can cause gastrointestinal illness as well as nasty skin infections — and sometimes can kill. So far this year, 24 Maryland cases of vibrio have been recorded, close to the average annual count of 30, but the season is far from over and officials say many cases likely go unreported.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1997
Human Genome Sciences Inc. announced yesterday that it has determined the genomic code of a bacteria that is the third leading cause of infection in hospitals.The Rockville genomics company said it hopes to strike research collaborations with other companies to develop antibiotics or other treatments to fight the bacteria, Enterococcus faecalis.The organism is normally found in the intestines, but increasingly is causing urinary tract, surgical wound and abdominal infections during hospitalization.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
On March 13th you published a letter written by reader Lois Raimondi Munchel titled "Stop the spread of deadly bacteria in nursing homes. " The letter was timely. It should send alarm bells ringing not only through the hallways of our nursing homes but also through our hospitals and our operating rooms. Not too long ago, at the NIH hospital, deadly Klebseilla bacteria resistant to all antibiotics, were found. Fifty percent of patients with this bacterial infection will die. These lethal, resistant bacteria have appeared in hospitals up and down the East Coast.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2011
Within days of the E.coli outbreak in Germany that officially ended this week, scientists at the University of Maryland Institute for Genome Sciences began cracking the genomic code of the bacteria responsible for infecting thousands and killing dozens. Information about all the genes that make up the bacteria from these scientists and others around the globe was soon offered online at no cost to doctors treating those infected, possibly saving lives, as well as to epidemiologists looking for the source of the pathogen.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | January 21, 1996
Everyone has one: a drain that never stays clear for long. Ours is the bathtub, and when the plumber came last time he talked us into a product called Bio-Clean, sold only through plumbers. Believe it or not, this is a jar of bacteria, grown in incubators, dried and mixed with "enzymes and other helpers." You put a tablespoon in a pint of water and pour it down the drain every night for five nights. The bacteria sit in your pipes, eat waste matter (here comes the important part if you have a teen-age daughter)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Extra attention to hygiene means fewer germs are infecting people in health care settings these days, but particularly hardy bacteria called Clostridium difficile are defying the trend - and even gaining in strength. Patients endure round after round of antibiotics to knock out the bug, known as C. diff., which causes abdominal pain, extreme diarrhea and potentially fatal inflammation of the colon. Increasingly, however, doctors are turning to a cure that may seem every bit as yucky as the problem.
NEWS
December 12, 2013
The rise of drug-resistant bacteria is one of the more alarming health threats of the past several decades. Some of the nation's top hospitals, including one operated by the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, have experienced deadly outbreaks. Altogether, such infections kill an estimated 23,000 Americans each year, which is more than die of leukemia, Parkinson's disease or HIV/AIDS, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One factor thought to be contributing to the deadly trend is the use of antibiotics in farm animals.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Wear eye makeup to bed or don't wash your face well and you may wind up with pimple-like styes on your eyelids. The bumps don't typically lead to vision loss, but can cause scarring if not treated. Dr. Karen Dunlap, assistant professor of ophthalmology at The Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins, said that it is easy to prevent eye styes. What is a stye and what are the symptoms? A stye, also known as an external hordeolum, is a localized infection in one of the oil glands at the edge of the eyelid.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
State health investigators suspect that a deadly outbreak of infections at Monarch Medspa in Timonium last year may have stemmed from "visibly dirty" equipment or two health care workers who carried the same bacterium found in patients, according to a report released Friday. The investigation found that doctors and nurses sometimes failed to wear gloves and that there was no separation of sterilized and dirty equipment. Health officials inspected the facility and interviewed patients after three infections were reported in September 2012; one of those patients, a 59-year-old Lochearn woman, died days after undergoing liposuction.
NEWS
July 7, 2013
Baltimore County health officials have lifted warnings about swimming at two area beaches, but one swimming ban remains at the Genessee Valley Outdoor Learning Center's upper pond. On July 3, officials had closed the beaches at Genessee Valley, Oregon Ridge and Beaver Dam Quarry based on high bacteria levels. Officials said the high levels were caused by heavy rainfall that occurred last week. On Sunday, officials posted on the county website that the Oregon Ridge and Beaver Dam Quarry beaches have been reopened based on new water samples.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Three Baltimore County beaches are closed after health officials determined that the level of bacteria there makes swimming unsafe. Officials said Wednesday that Genesee Valley Outdoor Learning Center (Upper Pond), Oregon Ridge Park Beach and Beaver Dam Swim Club Beach have unsafe levels of bacteria. The high levels of bacteria were caused by the region's unusual amount of rainfall in recent weeks, they said. The beaches will re-open when testing shows it is safe, they said. For information on water testing in the county, visit http://www.baltimorecountymd.gov/Agencies/health/environmentalhealth/watersampling/results.html alisonk@baltsun.com twitter.com/aliknez
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
The start of summer lures many Marylanders to the Chesapeake Bay and area rivers for a dip along the shoreline. It also brings increased monitoring of beach and water quality, and sometimes dire warnings about bacteria levels. This week, South Riverkeeper Diana Muller took 11 water samples along beaches south of Annapolis. All but one tested above safe swimming limits, prompting her to post the bacteria counts on Facebook with the caption: "I just received my bacteria results - PLEASE DO NOT SWIM in the SOUTH RIVER!
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Anne Arundel County health officials have removed the no-swimming advisories they put in place at three swimming beaches earlier this week. The advisories are no longer in place for Beverly Beach near Mayo on the Chesapeake Bay, Londontown's Arundel Road Beach on the South River and Upper Magothy Beach in Severna Park on the Magothy River. Water samples taken at the beaches on June 6 and June 13 showed high levels of the bacteria enterococci, which indicates the presence of waste from warm-blooded animals in the water.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
The start of summer lures many Marylanders to the Chesapeake Bay and area rivers for a dip along the shoreline. It also brings increased monitoring of beach and water quality, and sometimes dire warnings about bacteria levels. This week, South Riverkeeper Diana Muller took 11 water samples along beaches south of Annapolis. All but one tested above safe swimming limits, prompting her to post the bacteria counts on Facebook with the caption: "I just received my bacteria results - PLEASE DO NOT SWIM in the SOUTH RIVER!
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