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FEATURES
By Leah Polakoff and For the Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Enjoy the tide from your own backyard with this spacious house in Annapolis. From the pier that sprawls across the edge of the backyard, watch the sea of sailboats that have become a staple of life on Weems Creek, then launch your own. The spacious Annapolis house boasts an open plan and six bedrooms (two are master bedrooms). Built in 1967 and remodeled in 1997, it's well suited for entertaining adults on the multilevel deck or throwing the kids a pool party. Guests will arrive via the elegant paved driveway curving in the front of the house.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 11, 2007
During a recent scorching evening, Peter Norman and I slipped into his downtown Baltimore backyard to watch his bees work. Like many residents of Baltimore, these honeybees were out on their "front porch," the lower part of their hive, where the air is cooler, Norman said. An estimated 50,000 to 60,000 honeybees reside in the 3-foot-tall hive, a squarish structure, ringed in handsome varnished pine. There is a hierarchy to the hive, he told me. The queen and nursery bees reside on the lower floor, or "brood"; the honey and its foragers can be found in the upper levels.
FEATURES
By Julianne Peeling and For The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Recently back from a trip to the Caribbean, Jeannie Schwartz and John Macci still had the exotic scent of orchids and plumeria lingering in their imaginations when they stepped out their back door to take in the familiar sight of their own backyard. An immaculate, newly finished stone and concrete patio and in-ground pool greeted them. But the project they had worked so hard on now seemed drab compared to the sights they had just enjoyed. Schwartz and Macci knew something more was needed to make their backyard equal to the lush tropical locales from their travels.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 25, 2004
AS SUMMER fades into autumn, mosquitoes are making their final attempts to suck our precious bodily fluids. Accordingly, one of the joys of my life recently has been to go out in the backyard and count dead bugs, especially mosquitoes. The bugs have been appearing in the watery bottom of a combination outdoor light and bug trap called Bug D'Light, an invention of Bob Carver Sr., a Richmond, Va., electrician. It is the latest weapon I have employed in my battle with mosquitoes for control of my backyard.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | July 1, 2007
Most business owners believe in their products, and Alexa Corcoran is no different. Except that she also lives on the meals made by her Maryland enterprise, Let's Dish!, a meal-assembly store that has nine locations in the region and plans for more. Customers at the store put together their own meals to cook at home. "Since 2004, we have ... created over a million dishes," says Corcoran, 34, who invested in the business with her husband, Rick, and a couple of friends. "It's a concept that came when people were saying they wanted easy and convenient meals but also healthy."
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2005
Hon, let's go shopping There's a new "hon" in town. But you won't find her in Bawlmer. Thanks, Hon, a new Baltimore-flavored gift shop, has just opened in Towson. Offering eclectic and fun gifts, unusual knickknacks and whimsical craft works by local artists, Thanks, Hon was the brainchild of three longtime friends and PTA moms from Towson -- Lyn Reeves, Brenda Prevas and Laura Scheeler. Much of the shop's collection comes from gift shows that Reeves attends around the country. And some comes from local artists, who've consigned their unique wares, like the adorable "Baltimore Hon" light switches (right)
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | November 23, 1991
I collect leaves the old fashioned way, with a rake, a barrel and a kid. The rake assembles the leaves, the barrel holds them. Then the kid jumps in and squashes them.Long ago I was a leaf squasher, but last week I worked on the other side of the barrel as a gatherer. My 6-year-old started off raking. However, once the position of squasher opened up, he tossed aside the rake and the snow shovel, which he had used to scoop up the leaves, and climbed feet-first into the barrel.As dads do, I began to give the kid instructions.
NEWS
May 2, 2001
A RED FOX sunning itself in the backyard may be an interesting wildlife experience for suburbanites, but the animal could also be infected with rabies. So, too, could raccoons raiding the bird feeder for a nighttime snack, or the skunk digging in a porchside flower bed. These unexpected animal incursions should remind people of the importance of keeping a cautious distance -- and remind pet owners to make sure their dogs and cats get up-to-date rabies vaccinations. A bite from a diseased wild animal is fatal for an unvaccinated pet; the rabies virus rapidly attacks the nervous system.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | April 20, 1991
A speeding soccer ball narrowly missed crashing through th kitchen window the other day. It reminded me that the broken window season had begun.This is the season when the kids go outdoors. They play ball. The balls break windows. Then the dads repair the windows.I know, I've been on both the window-breaking and the window-fixing ends of this cycle.My prime window-breaking days were years ago when I was kid playing baseball in our backyard. The backyard was, of course, "too small" to hold a real ballgame in. That is what my parents repeatedly told my brothers and me. They also reminded us that a big park, with a real baseball diamond, was a mere two blocks away.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | April 6, 1991
Every spring I have the urge to sow seeds. When the sun is warm, and the wind is gentle, I go out in the back yard and plant grass seed.I rake. I fertilize. I scatter seeds. And I keep my fingers crossed and hope that maybe this year something will make it to the seedling stage before being trampled to death.The tramplers are my children and their buddies. And as happens in families, the kids have pretty much taken over the back yard.When we moved into the house, the previous owners, a child-free couple, had the back yard looking like a photo spread in Rowhouse Beautiful Magazine.
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