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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 6, 2000
It's hard to decide what comes through most clearly in "Backstage" -- the power of hip-hop or the anger underlying it. Filmed during last year's Hard Knock Life Tour, an all-star traveling rap and hip-hop festival featuring acts from Roc-A-Fella and Def Jam records, "Backstage" captures energetic performances from DMX, Method Man, Red- man, Ja Rule, Beanie Sigel and Amil. But the movie catches serious fire when Jay-Z commandeers the stage, working the crowd and talking about what's happening.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Some final tidbits from backstage at the Oscars 2014: -- Spike Jonze, clutching his Original Screenplay Oscar for “Her,” said he wasn't necessarily foretelling the future with his film about a lonely man who falls in love and carries on a relationship with his computer operating system. “I have no idea,” he said. “I think anything is going to happen and everything's going to happen.” Was he trying to issue some sort of warning about where rampant technology could lead?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Staff | February 20, 2005
Hanging around backstage at the Academy Awards for 10 years, you pick up a few things. And, if you're a writer, you put them in a book, which is what Steve Pond has done in The Big Show: High Times and Dirty Dealings Backstage at the Academy Awards. Pond, originally granted permission to be a fly on Oscar's wall 10 years ago for a story for Premiere magazine, has been backstage at every Academy Awards since 1995. With this year's ceremonies only a week away, he agreed to answer some questions about what goes on behind the scenes of the movie industry's biggest night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Forget the stars. The people I always wanted to talk to were the writers and producers who created the fictional worlds that became long-running TV series. One of the great pleasures of this job in my earlier days on the beat was going out to California, breaking away from my colleagues on the press tour and spending a long afternoon in a producer's bungalow on a studio backlot as he or she told me and my tape recorder how their visions became prime-time series. Whether it was Steven Bochco talking about “Hill Street Blues” or Larry Gelbart explaining the history of “M*A*S*H,” I always felt as if I was being let in on a great secret as to how entertainment, culture and sometimes even art was improbably created in the hyper-commercial world of Hollywood.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 24, 1992
Tommy Tune and his fellow cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" will present a benefit for the Chase-Brexton Clinic and Equity Fights AIDS at 11:30 p.m. Friday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Titled "Backstage at Bye Bye Birdie," the benefit is an informal revue of Broadway show tunes that has been performed to sold-out audiences in Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and Tampa, raising a total of more than $50,000.Mr. Tune, a nine-time Tony Award winner, is the headliner in the touring production of "Bye Bye Birdie," currently playing at the Lyric Opera House.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 26, 1992
Tommy Tune and his fellow cast members from "Bye Bye Birdie" will present a benefit for the Chase-Brexton Clinic and Equity Fights AIDS at 11:30 p.m. Friday at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.Titled "Backstage at Bye Bye Birdie," the benefit is an informal revue of Broadway show tunes that has been performed to sold-out audiences in Washington, Boston, Philadelphia and Tampa, raising a total of more than $50,000.Mr. Tune, a nine-time Tony Award winner, is the headliner in the touring production of "Bye Bye Birdie," currently playing at the Lyric Opera House.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
Directors of a dance studio and a preschool displaced by the Aug. 2 fire at the Bryant Woods Neighborhood Center say they are determined to bounce back quickly."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | July 3, 1992
The common advice given to novice writers is: "Write what you know." Kimberley Lynne seems to have followed it in her entertaining first play, "Brief Candle," receiving its premiere at the Vagabond Theatre as part of the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.A local actress whose background, according to the program, includes jobs on the production staffs at various regional theaters, Lynne has penned a backstage comedy-mystery chock-full of the sort of roles actors love to play -- i.e., they get to portray actors.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 18, 2001
You don't have to admire "A Conversation with Gregory Peck," airing tonight as part of the acclaimed "American Masters" series on PBS. The 90-minute film is directed and produced by two-time Academy Award-winner Barbara Kopple ("Harlan County USA" and "American Dream"), and it's a pleasure to sit back and let such a gifted storyteller take you where she will with her camera. In this program, there's only Peck and Kopple's camera - no correspondent, no narrator, no production razzle-dazzle to come between you and the subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 17, 1992
Given the group's reputation for hell-raising, you might thin that there would be no wilder place on earth than backstage at a Guns N' Roses concert.And boy, would you be mistaken.Just ask Faith No More keyboardist Roddy Bottum. He and his bandmates recently spent a couple months touring Europe as the Gunners' opening act, and will reprise their role for GNR's American outing with Metallica, which comes to RFK Stadium in Washington tonight. Bottum, therefore, knows whereof he speaks when it comes to backstage life with Axl, Slash and crew.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Wondering what Daniel Day-Lewis will say after he wins the Oscar for "Lincoln" Sunday night? Check here to find out. Anybody can watch the Oscars, but Baltimore Sun readers will have a special in, as I'll be blogging from the pressroom backstage -- it's the place where they take the winners after they're whisked off the floor -- with quotes, tidbits, observations and maybe even a snarky comment or two. This marks the 18th year I'll be...
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | August 24, 2012
Not long after they began living their dream of owning a dance studio in their new hometown of Columbia 25 years ago, two sisters from Michigan watched that dream go up in flames - the seven-alarm kind. Six years before tragedy struck, Diane Andrews and Mary Harper had decided to combine their artistic and entrepreneurial skills and become studio owners and artistic directors. Ready to take that leap of faith in June 1987, they rented a space and hustled to spread the word. “No one knew who we were,” recalls Harper, who had followed her older sister from Michigan, where they had cultivated reputations as performers and teachers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Sun reporter | February 24, 2012
Looking for backstage access to this year's Academy Awards? You've come to the right place. All weekend, I'll be blogging about what is being said backstage, as Hollywood takes the time to pat itself on the back for whatever good work it did in 2011. The fun begins on Saturday, when I'll be attending the 27th annual Spirit Awards, given to movies produced outside the major studios and with limited budgets. Among this year's big contenders is"The Artist," which is also favored in the Oscar race -- meaning this could be the first time ever that the same film has won the Best Picture Spirit and Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
This year's Army-Navy game will be the focus if a two-hour docu-drama co-produced by Showtime and CBS Sports. Showtime's cameras are spending six months in full-access, backstage coverage of the two academies and their teams in advance of the the game, according to the cable channel. The docu-drama will premiere Dec. 21 on Showtime, 10 nights after the game, which airs on CBS. A preview on the making of the docu-drama will air Nov. 23 on Showtime. Viewers can get their first look at the material on Oct. 17 when CBS.com launches a 10-part web series.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
The production of "The Mystery of Irma Vep" running at Everyman Theatre has a portrait that drips blood, an Egyptian sarcophagus, hidden passages out of which characters unexpectedly pop, a mad woman in the dungeon and such deliberately tongue-in-cheek dialogue as, "He killed the wrong wolf!" As outlandish as the onstage antics might seem, they can't hold a snuffed-out candle to the frenzied activity taking place backstage. Three dressers and a stagehand conduct a carefully choreographed dance that allows the show's two actors to make up to 50 full costume changes during each performance, complete with Victorian-era petticoats, wigs, false teeth and top hats - often in two seconds or less.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2008
LOS ANGELES -- Last night was a great time to be Joel and Ethan Coen, as the Minnesota-born brothers performed an Oscar hat-trick, collecting gold statuettes for producing, writing and directing 2007's best picture winner, No Country for Old Men. The film, the story of a drug deal gone horribly bad and the aftermath gone even worse, was the evening's most-honored film, winning four Oscars.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 17, 1992
Given the group's reputation for hell-raising, you might think that there would be no wilder place on earth than backstage at a Guns N' Roses concert.And boy, would you be mistaken.Just ask Faith No More keyboardist Roddy Bottum. He and his bandmates recently spent a couple months touring Europe as the Gunners' opening act, and will reprise their role for GNR's American outing with Metallica, which comes to RFK Stadium in Washington tonight. Bottum, therefore, knows whereof he speaks when it comes to backstage life with Axl, Slash and crew.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2000
MORE THAN 20 YEARS after owners began modernizing the Lyric Opera House in Baltimore, they are seeking funds to complete the last major phase of the project, expansion of the backstage facilities. The nonprofit Lyric Foundation, owner of the 106-year-old, 2,564-seat theater on Mount Royal Avenue, is seeking $2 million from the Maryland General Assembly this spring to help fund a $5 million to $6 million reconstruction of the stage area. Other funds will be sought from public and private sources, including the city of Baltimore.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
The showpiece of Preakness Day may not occur until after 6 p.m., but the festivities begin just after dawn. For everyone from the half-dressed college kids on the infield to the fancy-hatted patrons in the grandstand, the race remains one of Baltimore's biggest galas. The jockeys, trainers and owners get most of the attention, but many others contribute to putting on the show. Here are a few of their stories. Sitting down on the job Donna Brothers has grown used to people thinking she has a cool job. Her life has always revolved around horses, and now she gets to ride them on the biggest stage imaginable as the post-race interviewer on NBC's Triple Crown broadcasts.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | May 11, 2007
Most of the theater majors at the Baltimore School for the Arts ache to be on stage. But yesterday they were transformed into an audience of acolytes, soaking up anecdotes and advice from three professional actresses appearing in Doubt at the Hippodrome Theatre. The school's jampacked dance studio was hot, and the ambient noise - buses, trucks, a siren, even clarinet practice - threatened to drown out the speakers. But the 100 students sat in rapt attention, their eager hands shooting up in droves with questions for Cherry Jones, who won a Tony Award as Sister Aloysius, the stern parochial school principal in John Patrick Shanley's play; Lisa Joyce, who plays a young teaching nun; and Caroline Stefanie Clay, who plays the mother of a student.
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