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NEWS
July 30, 2012
The declarations by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel that they don't want Chick-fil-A franchises in their cities because the owner of Chick-fil-A is a devout Christian and opposes same-sex marriage are ridiculous ("Banned in Boston? If mayor has his way," July 27). Are they willing to kick out every business whose owner doesn't support gay marriage? And why stop at businesses? Why not ask all those who oppose gay marriage to stay away from those cities? If you're going to take a stand, then you should be consistent.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | August 12, 2014
The awfulness of Gaza goes on. So does the madness in Iraq and Syria. Wildfires burn through the West, while in Washington, D.C., our do-absolutely-nothing Congress prepares to adjourn, freeing up time for representatives and senators to go home and campaign to be re-elected so they can accomplish nothing for another two years. It seems an opportune time to consider a far less depressing issue, one that, outside of Hollywood and the Redneck Riviera, affects only a small minority: artificial body enhancement, AKA cosmetic surgery or "having a little work done.
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BUSINESS
March 25, 2010
BEIJING - Google Inc.'s business ties in China unraveled a little more Wednesday amid a widening backlash to the U.S. Internet company's decision to move its Chinese search engine offshore in a challenge to the country's online censorship laws. While the stand is winning Google praise in the U.S. and other countries, it's threatening to turn the company into a pariah in China. A high-profile Communist Party newspaper skewered Google in a front-page article. And more of its partners and advertising customers in the country appeared to be distancing themselves from the company.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 9, 2014
Last week a majority of the Supreme Court decided that the First Amendment protects the right of individuals to pour as much as $3.6 million into a political party or $800,000 into a political campaign. The court said such spending doesn't corrupt democracy. That's utter baloney, as anyone who has the faintest familiarity with contemporary American politics well knows. The McCutcheon v. FEC decision would be less troubling were the distribution of income and wealth in America more equal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
A party bus company that promised "luxury charter buses" to the Sweetlife Music Festival Saturday is facing a major backlash and thousands of dollars in refunds after it left hundreds of customers stranded. Numaan Akram, founder and CEO of Rock & Bus, conceded Monday the company screwed up and was working through "hundreds" of complaints to offer refunds to disgruntled customers. "Unfortunately, we had a serious problem," he said. On Saturday, some 1,800 people had booked transportation to the festival through the company, Akram said.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | November 16, 1997
WHEN I WAS in high school in the late 1970s, the end of the era of the stay-at-home mother, a teacher of mine became pregnant. I remember asking if she planned to leave her job. I don't remember her precise words, only that she made it seem old-fashioned even to suggest that one should have to choose between children and a career.She was a smart and caring person, so I'm sure her kids turned out fine. But I'll bet that somewhere along the line she found the family/job conundrum less easily resolved than she seemed to think it would be.The era of the two-income family is two decades old. We are well past the point of being cavalier when it comes to work and children, and well into the backlash phase.
NEWS
November 17, 1994
President Clinton isn't the only Arkansas product coming in for criticism. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., based in Bentonville, Ark., has been fending off scattered protests in the United States, including several in Maryland, from people who fear the retailer's impact on traffic, land use patterns and small business.In the face of stiff opposition, the company recently dropped plans to build in Owings Mills as well as several other places across the country. But the protests tend to be sporadic and highly localized, rather than any widespread backlash against this national chain that has grown into the most profilic retailer in the land.
NEWS
By Georgette Mosbacher | April 22, 1992
A CONSPIRACY theory is making the rounds and it's surprisingly comprehensive. It takes as its victim nothing less than all American women. In this plot, the hydra-headed enemy consists of the press, cosmetics industry, fashion advertisers, lawyers, doctors and, of course, men, all supposedly working together to wage an undeclared, invidious war on women -- a so-called backlash against feminism.According to this plot, women have been manipulated into rejecting feminism. And, in the process, they are destroying themselves by choosing inappropriate values and goals for their lives.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | November 16, 1994
Just days after the election, the Republican chairman of Howard County's General Assembly delegation says he and a colleague have felt Democratic backlash against GOP gains in the legislature.The Democrat-dominated Montgomery County delegation voted last week to exclude Howard County delegation Chairman Robert L. Flanagan and Del. Robert H. Kittleman from voting on Montgomery County bills during delegation meetings.Both of the two Republicans live in Howard and each represents a small portion of Montgomery County, in addition to Ellicott City and western Howard.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | November 2, 1993
I have neither the authority nor the responsibility to apologize for this newspaper. But I am going to do so anyway.Yesterday, we ran a story in our feature section trumpeting the "End of P.C.""Because it's finally happening," said the light-hearted report on a supposed backlash against political correctness. "After years in which everyone watched their conversational p's and q's, there may finally be a political correctness backlash afoot."The story cited as proof of this backlash: the decision by comedian Ted Danson to appear in blackface at the New York Friars Club and tell vulgar jokes laced with racial epithets about his sex life with comedian Whoopi Goldberg; the popularity of radio personality Howard Stern; and the rapid rise to success of the "Beavis and Butt-head" cartoon on MTV.In the story, we quoted Christopher Cerf, who has written a spoof of politically correct terms: "There's a whole range of places where [politically correct language]
NEWS
December 27, 2013
Maryland has long been a heavily Democratic state, but 2013 may have cemented its status as a truly liberal one. The two things were not always synonymous. Though Democrats have dominated the legislature and governor's mansion for decades, the party's caucus has traditionally been ideologically diverse, with healthy doses elected officials who voiced relatively conservative fiscal and social views. They represented places like Dundalk or Southern Maryland where voters abandoned the Democratic nominee in 2002 to elect Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. governor.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
The Baltimore Sun's Don Markus, Jeff Barker and Jonas Shaffer weigh in on three topics in Terps athletics this week. What's the biggest difference between this year's season opener against Connecticut at the Barclays Center and last year's opener against Kentucky in the same building? Don Markus: Last year, nobody gave the Terps a chance to beat a then-very overrated Kentucky team that came into the season ranked No. 3 after winning the national championship the previous season.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 22, 2013
A couple months ago, I got an email from Supreet. Supreet is in the 11th grade. He shops at Wal-Mart and plays basketball. His father came to this country from India and both are Sikhs, followers of a centuries-old faith founded in the Punjab region. Supreet wanted to tell me what it is like being a Sikh in America. He wrote about how, after 9/11, his father became "perhaps the most hated man in our small town. " He wrote about how his dad had to stop wearing the turban Sikh men use to cover their "kesh," the hair their faith forbids them to cut. He wrote about bullying and depression suffered by young Sikhs.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 20, 2013
My fellow white people — many of us, maybe most of us — get really weird about the subject of race, especially when black people raise questions about the way they are treated. Reactions range from silence to white-hot vitriol to moderate unease to social-media snark. All of that was on display in the past week, after the verdict in the George Zimmerman case in Florida. Andy Harris, Maryland's lone Republican in Congress, said people who complained about Zimmerman's acquittal in the shooting of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin should "get over it. " With that dismissive comment, Harris spoke for all white Americans who dislike conversations about race and who wish black Americans would stop complaining about conditions and stop contriving racism.
BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Maryland's largest gun manufacturer has decided not to leave the state just yet. Beretta USA threatened to abandon its home on the Potomac if Maryland passed a strict new gun-control law, but after the law was signed the company announced that its operations would remain in Prince George's County for now. However, Beretta added, it would look elsewhere for future expansions. Beretta and another Maryland gun maker have taken a wait-and-see approach to leaving the state, balancing the risk of a customer backlash against the cost and difficulty of a possible move, while keeping up with unprecedented demand for guns of all kinds.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
If the tenor of their questions is any indication, the justices on the U.S. Supreme Court appeared evenly divided in the challenge to California's law banning gay marriage, with Justice Anthony Kennedy, predictably, in the middle. But rather than deciding which way to tip the scales, Justice Kennedy seemed to be looking for an escape hatch. Indeed, his most persistent line of questioning to the advoates on both sides sounded more like a lament: "I just wonder if this case was properly granted.
NEWS
By LEON ARON | December 17, 1993
Washington -- As the final tallies of the Russian parliamentary elections trickle in, the surprise victory of the populist nationalist Vladimir Zhirinovsky Liberal Democratic Party emerged as the most important result after the adoption of the constitution.The message it has sent will dominate strategies and actions among the Russian political class for at least the next few months.Societies undergoing a rapid political, economic and social change are bound to reach reflexively for the certitude and comfort of simple but firmly stated solutions.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | October 29, 1999
It certainly hasn't been a good week to be a sideline reporter.Between Jim Gray's little tete-a-tete Sunday night with Pete Rose and Chad Curtis' snub of Gray two nights later after World Series Game 3, one could wonder if the job of sideline reporter, thought to be among the cushiest in the business, will be worth the time and trouble.But some industry officials say this week's events are but a blip on the control room screen, and expect business to go on as usual, with reporters interviewing athletes and coaches and asking occasionally tough questions.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Customers at Towson Hot Bagels usually pay with credit, not cash, when buying a bagel or a bottle of water, triggering fees the merchant must pay to process each transaction. Now, the shop's owner and retailers across the country may recoup "swipe" fees as a result of a preliminary settlement with Visa, MasterCard and major banks. When a consumer pays with a credit card, retailers can tack on a surcharge or "checkout fee" of up to 4 percent of the purchase to cover processing. But there's no rush among merchants to start charging this fee. Independent shop owners, national chains and retail trade groups insist they have no desire to pass credit card fees along to consumers so directly.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Independent U.S. Senate candidate Rob Sobhani agreed to pull down an advertisement he began airing on black radio stations this week that attacked incumbent Sen. Ben Cardin after state Democrats complained Friday the spot was riddled with inaccuracies. The ad plays a passage from a 2006 debate in which Cardin's one-time opponent, Kweisi Mfume, criticizes him for his time in office. "You get in Washington, you get this Potomac Fever -- you just think that God put you there," the ad quotes Mfume saying at the debate.
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