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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - Night was falling as Justine Henin's star rose again at Wimbledon yesterday. Henin's backhand crackled on a Centre Court that looked a little like a haunted house, with the ghosts of tennis past fluttering into the gloaming, into the rafters. And there was a ghost, of sorts, on the other side of the net, Monica Seles, 28, a little slower and a little less bold than before. They played through dueling service breaks and after rain delays, through an afternoon turned chilly evening, and finally to one last tiebreaker in a swirling wind, with No. 6 seed Henin of Belgium beating No. 4 Seles, 7-5, 7-6 (4)
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NEWS
June 12, 2012
I'm as excited as the next person about Baltimore's Sailabration, but just as refreshing was the observation that the event will be "the Baltimore Grand Prix times ten. " A backhanded compliment if ever there was one, but after the Sun's relentless negative coverage of the Grand Prix, racing fans had to love the third party recognition! Peter Bell, Monkton
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SPORTS
May 11, 1998
HittingScott Rolen, Phillies: 3-for-3, 2 HRs.Todd Helton, Rockies: 2-for-4, 2 HRs.Craig Biggio, Astros: 2-for-4, 2 doubles.Derek Bell, Astros: 2-for-5, 2 doubles, 2 RBIs.PitchingOrel Hershiser, Giants: 8 innings, 2 hits, 0 runs.FieldingRaul Mondesi, Dodgers: In the second, he retreated to the warning track in right field and made a running, backhand grab of pitcher Brian Meadows' two-out, bases-loaded fly.Pub Date: 5/11/98
SPORTS
By Liz Clarke and Liz Clarke,The Washington Post | August 5, 2009
WASHINGTON -- It was a match decided by centimeters, from the first set to the last. But that hardly made the defeat easier to bear for American Robby Ginepri, who for more than two hours Tuesday fended off a barrage of aces from Germany's Benjamin Becker at the Legg Mason Tennis Classic only to crumple in the third and final tiebreak. Becker, no relation to his country's elder tennis statesman Boris, fittingly closed the match with his 27th ace and advanced, courtesy of the 7-6 (3), 6-7 (1)
SPORTS
By CHARLES BRICKER and CHARLES BRICKER,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 12, 2006
PARIS -- One more tap of the racket on the bottom of his red clay-caked shoes. One more deep breath before the final serve. And then, one more point -- a perfectly struck swinging forehand volley from midcourt that slammed down with such accuracy that Roger Federer knew instantly his next move would be a handshake at the net. Predicted by many two weeks ago, Rafael Nadal, like Justine Henin-Hardenne a day earlier, has won back-to-back French Open titles,...
SPORTS
By Jim Sarni and Jim Sarni,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | June 2, 1991
PARIS -- Jimmy Connors lashed a backhand return for th break, and as he walked to his chair for the changeover, everyone at Stade Roland Garros stood up and roared.The noise didn't cease as Connors got up, poured water over his head to wash away the sweat and the tears, wrapped his face in a towel and returned to the court to serve out the fourth set against Michael Chang.Connors double-faulted to 15-30, but then ripped a forehand, and you could feel 17,000 hearts riding the ball into the open court.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
WIMBLEDON -- As far as Monica Seles is concerned, the stuffed tiger in Katarina Studenikova's tennis bag was more aggressive than Seles herself was while getting upset yesterday by the 59th-ranked player from Slovakia."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
NEW YORK -- They walked on the court like two heavyweight boxers ready to go 15 rounds for a title, and, all of a sudden, they owned the stadium.That was what this night was about. There were bright lights and an even brighter moon, and a stadium packed so tight that fans were sitting in the aisles.But the stars were right on the court, dressed in outfits dipped in designer colors, wearing baseball caps tugged down tight around their foreheads. For the first time since they ripped the U.S. Open out of Forest Hills and brought it to this public park called the National Tennis Center, the headliners weren't a Connors or a McEnroe.
SPORTS
By Ohm Youngmisuk and Ohm Youngmisuk,Sun Staff Writer | July 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- He didn't drop a set last year en route to the Legg Mason Tennis Classic title. Now, after a relatively easy road into the quarterfinals, Stefan Edberg has had to battle all kinds of elements to get back into the final.Playing with a sore shoulder and fatigued from his three-set, rain-delayed comeback win late Friday night, Edberg yesterday held off Australian Patrick Rafter, 7-5, 5-7, 6-2, to advance to his second consecutive Classic final.The second seed will face top-ranked Andre Agassi today at 2 p.m. Agassi knocked off fourth seed Todd Martin, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5)
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 30, 2005
WIMBLEDON, England - The rising young Frenchman. The unknown Czech. The veteran German. The former French Open champion from Spain with the quick feet. And then, yesterday, the wild-swinging Chilean, Fernando Gonzalez, became the fifth player to be sent packing by Roger Federer. Through the first 10 days of Wimbledon, Paul-Henri Mathieu, Ivo Minar, Nicolas Kiefer, Juan Carlos Ferrero and anyone else searching for the smallest crack in Federer's game has been greatly disappointed. Federer has lost one set, a tiebreaker to Kiefer, which he could blame on un-Federer-like consecutive double faults.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | July 9, 2007
WIMBLEDON, England -- Roger Federer lost his temper over a line call and misplaced his magical ground strokes for nearly two hours, but he never lost touch with his champion's heart and, in one of the most stirring Grand Slam finals in recent years, defeated archrival Rafael Nadal yesterday to win a record-tying fifth consecutive Wimbledon. There was joy flowing everywhere on Centre Court as 51-year-old Bjorn Borg, the tennis icon whose mark he matched, came down from the Royal Box at the end of this 7-6 (7)
SPORTS
By CHARLES BRICKER and CHARLES BRICKER,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 12, 2006
PARIS -- One more tap of the racket on the bottom of his red clay-caked shoes. One more deep breath before the final serve. And then, one more point -- a perfectly struck swinging forehand volley from midcourt that slammed down with such accuracy that Roger Federer knew instantly his next move would be a handshake at the net. Predicted by many two weeks ago, Rafael Nadal, like Justine Henin-Hardenne a day earlier, has won back-to-back French Open titles,...
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 30, 2005
WIMBLEDON, England - The rising young Frenchman. The unknown Czech. The veteran German. The former French Open champion from Spain with the quick feet. And then, yesterday, the wild-swinging Chilean, Fernando Gonzalez, became the fifth player to be sent packing by Roger Federer. Through the first 10 days of Wimbledon, Paul-Henri Mathieu, Ivo Minar, Nicolas Kiefer, Juan Carlos Ferrero and anyone else searching for the smallest crack in Federer's game has been greatly disappointed. Federer has lost one set, a tiebreaker to Kiefer, which he could blame on un-Federer-like consecutive double faults.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Someone should have found a warning label and made sure No. 1 seed Andre Agassi and No. 2 Andy Roddick saw it before their semifinal matches yesterday in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic. The label should have read: Beware of trouble in third-set tiebreakers. But there were no warnings, and the two Americans were eliminated in impressive and entertaining fashion. In the first of the two matches, Roddick was swept away by No. 10 seed Tim Henman, 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (1), and then, last night, Agassi, who fought back to force the extra inning, was ousted by No. 4 Fernando Gonzalez, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (5)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 3, 2002
WIMBLEDON, England - Night was falling as Justine Henin's star rose again at Wimbledon yesterday. Henin's backhand crackled on a Centre Court that looked a little like a haunted house, with the ghosts of tennis past fluttering into the gloaming, into the rafters. And there was a ghost, of sorts, on the other side of the net, Monica Seles, 28, a little slower and a little less bold than before. They played through dueling service breaks and after rain delays, through an afternoon turned chilly evening, and finally to one last tiebreaker in a swirling wind, with No. 6 seed Henin of Belgium beating No. 4 Seles, 7-5, 7-6 (4)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1999
NEW YORK -- Venus Williams watched Mary Joe Fernandez slip on the Arthur Ashe Stadium court late yesterday afternoon, and a look of pain and concern immediately crossed her face.As Fernandez sat there, checking her body parts, Williams crossed the court to her side."I'm sorry, Mary," Williams said. "You OK, Mary?""No, but that's OK," Fernandez told her, adding she would probably be all right later.But it was the beginning of the end for Fernandez yesterday. A strained quadriceps curtailed her mobility and short-circuited her game plan, and Williams' game improved.
SPORTS
By Charles Bricker and Charles Bricker,South Florida Sun-Sentinel | July 9, 2007
WIMBLEDON, England -- Roger Federer lost his temper over a line call and misplaced his magical ground strokes for nearly two hours, but he never lost touch with his champion's heart and, in one of the most stirring Grand Slam finals in recent years, defeated archrival Rafael Nadal yesterday to win a record-tying fifth consecutive Wimbledon. There was joy flowing everywhere on Centre Court as 51-year-old Bjorn Borg, the tennis icon whose mark he matched, came down from the Royal Box at the end of this 7-6 (7)
SPORTS
By Ashley McGeachy and Ashley McGeachy,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Beating the No. 1,015 player in the world normally is not cause for celebration.But for Thomas Hogstedt, he was playing for pride when he beat five-time Wimbledon champion and fellow Swede Bjorn Borg, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5), last night in the first round of the NationsBank Classic at the H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center."It was a big match," said Hogstedt, a 6-foot-3, 170-pound right-hander who practices at the same club with Borg. "I've been growing up with him and practicing with him since I was 15 up until two years ago."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
PARIS -- Steffi Graf came to match point. She bounced the golden-colored tennis ball six times, just as she had before each of her previous serves. But this wasn't any serve. This serve, if it was good enough, would get her into the French Open final, and you could almost feel her gather herself for a big, solid smash.It wasn't an ace, but it was strong enough to force Monica Seles to hit a forehand return long and propel Graf into her first Grand Slam final in nearly three years.The former world No. 1, who is the sixth seed here, defeated No. 3 Seles, 6-7 (2-7)
SPORTS
May 11, 1998
HittingScott Rolen, Phillies: 3-for-3, 2 HRs.Todd Helton, Rockies: 2-for-4, 2 HRs.Craig Biggio, Astros: 2-for-4, 2 doubles.Derek Bell, Astros: 2-for-5, 2 doubles, 2 RBIs.PitchingOrel Hershiser, Giants: 8 innings, 2 hits, 0 runs.FieldingRaul Mondesi, Dodgers: In the second, he retreated to the warning track in right field and made a running, backhand grab of pitcher Brian Meadows' two-out, bases-loaded fly.Pub Date: 5/11/98
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