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NEWS
August 31, 1995
Another school year has started, and a record number of Carroll County's public school students have the opportunity to immerse themselves in education, one of the most important human endeavors. Children have another year to acquire more knowledge, develop their minds and build on their character.Even though this school year began in late August, the opening of school should be seen as an opportunity to start afresh -- the way we consider spring the season of rebirth, growth and optimism.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
William Chin | August 27, 2014
This month more than 50 million American children will report to our public and elementary school systems to begin another school year, bringing with them not only new books, laptops, smartphones and iPads, but also their parents' hopes and dreams for a bright and healthy future. Unfortunately - and often all too tragically - a growing percentage of students enter or return to school without the most important back to school requirement: vaccinations. These students are part of a new generation vulnerable to childhood diseases that have long since been under control but are now making a comeback due to parental misinformation and bad science.
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NEWS
August 22, 2005
The Baltimore City public school system will operate a back-to-school "command center" at its headquarters today to Sept. 2 to respond to questions from parents and guardians about issues such as registration, immunization, school assignments, transfers and transportation. The command center, in the Alice G. Pinderhughes Administration Building at 200 E. North Ave., is in its third year of operation. During each of the first two years, the staff responded to about 1,000 calls. "With rare exception, one call to the command center puts a parent or guardian in touch with a ... staff person who can provide a quick response to a question or concern," Bonnie S. Copeland, the school system's chief executive officer, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Back-to-school promotions showed up in many area stores in mid-July. But now that the kids are back in classrooms -- or headed there soon -- the real shopping will begin, one analyst believes. Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst for The NPD Group, says this year's shoppers are waiting for school to start. He noted that retail sales in July didn't get the expected bump to help kick off the third quarter. Here's his take: "Parents are prioritizing by purchasing supplies first, then some basic wardrobe necessities and lastly following up with fashion, putting summer aside and purchasing clothing and apparel for colder rather than warmer weather," he said today in an NPD blog post.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 12, 2000
You never saw so many "students" so happy to be back in school. Only these were grown-ups -- supporters of the Baltimore School for the Arts -- getting together for the school's annual fund-raiser, "Expressions 2000." First came an evening "class" in theater, music or art, then dinner in the school's ballroom, followed by a performance by past and current students. Although everyone wore a name tag, it wasn't hard to recognize many of Baltimore's movers and shakers in this student population of 450, including: Erin and Doug Becker, event co-chairs; Amy Elias and Sally Michel, past chairs; Clair Zamoiski Segal, school board chair; Sharon Nevins and Jim Dale, board members; Stanley Romanstein, school director; Leslie Shepard, dean of arts; Claire Ingalls, Towson University music educator; former Mayor Kurt Schmoke, partner with Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering; Ron Daniel, Baltimore police commissioner; and Martha Macks, president of Goya Girl Press.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 30, 1998
IT'S BACK-TO-SCHOOL time, parents, and you know what that means! It's time to get the kids off the TV-room sofa, using logging equipment if necessary, and take them to the mall for back-to-school supplies.Getting the right school supplies is crucial to your child's chances for success. We all remember the tragic story of young Abraham Lincoln, whose family could not afford school supplies, so he had to write on a shovel blade with a piece of coal. This meant that if young Abe saw a cute girl and wanted to pass her a note in class, he had to hand her this gross, filthy digging implement, sometimes with worm parts stuck to it, and she'd go, "Ewwww!"
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2002
SCHOOL IS OPEN, and it's time to volunteer. Local schools offer possibilities to help them provide an excellent place to learn. Volunteering is a direct way to become involved with the community on a flexible schedule. It's a way to meet children of all ages and other adults. Older adults can reconnect with young people. Moms and dads can learn how their children's peers act among friends. Volunteer work can be a bridge to a career in education or related fields. Those interested in art or literature can volunteer in the art room or library.
NEWS
September 1, 1991
The following prices for lunches in the Howard County Public Schoolshave been established for the 1991-1992 school year.Elementary lunch.. .. .. .. .. ..$1.00Middle and high school lunch.. ..$1.25Super lunch.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .$1.75Adult lunch.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .$1.65 w/o beverageMilk.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..25
NEWS
September 1, 1991
Howard County's rapidly growing school system will add two new schools Tuesday -- an elementary school in the western area of the county and a middle school in the east.The opening of Pointers Run Elementary and Mayfield Woods Middle are part of an ambitious $212.6 million construction program that will add 12 more new schools by the year2000. The two new schools opening this year bring the county total to 52.NOTE: SEE MAIN STORY POINTERS RUN IS A PRINCIPAL'S DREAM--AND STUDENTS LIKE IT TOO, NEW MAYFIELD WOODS MIDDLE SCHOOL IS 'AWESOME'
FEATURES
By James A. Fussell and James A. Fussell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 18, 1999
For kids, back-to-school means the end of staying up late and sleeping till noon. But for countless parents, back-to-school means something even more disturbing: open wallet and dump out contents.Back-to-school budgets include way more than just paper and pencils. There are haircuts, athletic fees, band fees and prepaid lunch cards. It's pants and shirts, belts and backpacks, hair ribbons and how much?Worse yet, the costs seem to sneak up on you. Even the most careful planner could miss this annual budget buster.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
At the front door of a home near Holabird Academy in Southeast Baltimore, new city schools CEO Gregory Thornton and the Baltimore Oriole Bird mascot greeted a gaggle of young children with fresh uniforms and backpacks, all ready for the first day of school. Thornton high-fived the children, his enthusiasm matching that of the grade-schoolers. He gestured toward the Oriole Bird. "Do you know that he's my friend?" "Oriole Bird your friend?" a tiny girl asked incredulously. Inside, a woman shrieked with laughter as the girl cautiously shook the mascot's hand.
NEWS
By Randi Hogan and Norris P. West | August 25, 2014
Every school should have a Donte Samuel. For more than eight years, Mr. Samuel has created a warm and happy environment at Belmont Elementary in West Baltimore, where excited pupils greet him daily with bright eyes and wide smiles in the middle of their regimented school day. Mr. Samuel is not a teacher or an administrator; he's not a school nurse, social worker or custodian. To the children, he's "coach," and to the principal and teachers at Belmont Elementary, he's a godsend and the key to a better classroom climate for the 355 students and 24 teachers.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
At the Target in Baltimore's Mondawmin Mall, megaphone-shaped "college" signs hang over aisles stocked with must-haves for students living on their own, such as mini-refrigerators, desk lamps and six-packs of ramen noodles. "Back to College" is a well-stocked department at Target and many other stores this time of year. It's no wonder. The college market represents the biggest chunk of back-to-school shopping, which itself is the second-biggest season for retailers after the holiday season.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
On Friday morning, in the auditorium of Loch Raven High School, more than 300 school administrators closed their eyes for 30 seconds. Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance had asked them to think about what could make schools "opportunity rich" for all students. "Those are the types of conversations we're going to have over the course of this year," Dance said in the school system's administrative and supervisory meeting to kick off the school year, which begins Aug. 25. The meeting for administrators and principals focused on equity, opportunity, engagement and relationships in county schools.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
As music videos played on flat screen TVs overhead, Brendon Lee, 7, sank into a brown cushioned stool at Shoe City on Monday while his great-aunt poked the toe of the white Converse sneaker on his left foot. It was the right shoe but the wrong size. "Your toe is right there," said Evelyn Forby, as she waited for a store associate to check in the back for something larger. New shoes were the last thing on the list as the Baltimore resident wrapped up back-to-school shopping for the boy she's raised since he was a baby.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | August 8, 2014
The Anne Arundel County school system is anticipating more than 8,000 county residents to attend back-to-school events that offer resources and information for the upcoming school year. For the fourth consecutive year, the school system is staging its Back-to-School Expo in partnership with Abundant Life Church in Glen Burnie. The Aug. 23 event is slated to be part of the church's Super Saturday Kids Carnival. On Fort Meade, the school system will launch its inaugural Back-to-School Bash on Aug. 16 at Meade Middle School, in conjunction with the  i5 Church and the Full Gospel Emancipation Life Center, both located in Odenton.
NEWS
By Gary M. Galles | August 10, 2007
MALIBU, Calif. -- Human nature often entails putting off unpleasant things. One of those often-unpleasant things is back-to-school shopping, which can mean high-volume wardrobe "negotiations" between parents and children. The mall awaits - and so do potential shopping disagreements that can leave parents feeling frustrated and befuddled. But understanding the economics of this traditional conflict can help ease parents' trepidation. Economics can be reduced to the proposition that incentives matter.
NEWS
sheila.peter@verizon.net | November 4, 2013
American Education Week will sweep through our local schools Nov. 18-22. Parent visitations, open houses and many exciting programs have been planned for this special week. Rodgers Forge Elementary School welcomes parents of grade three on Nov. 18, grades one and two on Nov. 19, grade five on Nov. 20, kindergarten on Nov. 21 and grade four on Nov. 22. From 8:30-11:30 a.m. on Nov. 20, St. Pius X School will hold an open house so that parents may visit their children's classrooms.
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