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SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | November 6, 1993
The early reports are good on the three Orioles who were given physical examinations yesterday by Dr. Charles Silberstein, the club's orthopedic specialist.Pitcher Mike Mussina was given a clean bill of health, while reliever Gregg Olson and outfielder Jeffrey Hammonds showed progress from the injuries that sidelined them last year.Hammonds, bothered all season by a herniated disk in the upper neck, is scheduled to undergo a magnetic resonance imaging next week. Olson, sidelined the past two months because of a partial tear in the elbow ligament, will stay on the same rehabilitation plan and won't begin throwing until January.
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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Storms that pummeled the Baltimore region Friday meant headaches for travelers at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport as flights were cancelled and delayed throughout Friday event. As of this morning, flights at BWI had returned to a normal schedule. Southwest Airlines, the dominant carrier at BWI, reported that about a dozen flights were cancelled, out of 205 scheduled departures. But because most other flights were full, they could not be rebooked Friday.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 28, 2001
I GUESS THIS is a before-and-after column. Some of the items were composed before 9-11 and were held because of the events of that day. Some were written after 9-11 and because of it. I guess this is a transitional piece, a way of getting back to "normal" business. A lot of Americans have been taking their time getting back to "normal." Since 9-11, it's been difficult to think of much else. It's affected how we feel about a great many aspects of life, in ways too mysterious and difficult to measure.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
The conversation between father and son seemed like hundreds they had before. Ralph Montalvo can't remember the specifics of what he talked about with his 21-year-old son, only how Rafi Montalvo sounded on the other end of the cell phone. After getting off the phone one night a couple of weeks ago, the elder Montalvo recalled telling his wife, Ivette, words that he never thought he'd say again after what happened to their oldest child near their South Florida home a year ago on Thanksgiving night.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | September 7, 1995
"Maybe now things will get back to normal," says Cal Ripken, major-league baseball's new champion iron man, Mr. 2,131.Maybe things will get back to normal, whatever that is. They've been anything but normal lately at Camden Yards.After the Hollywood-like love-ins of the last two nights as Cal caught Lou Gehrig and then passed him, you have to believe a return to normalcy is going to take a while.For one thing, this unassuming, clean-living, 35-year-old family man from little Aberdeen, has changed Baltimore.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 8, 1999
The annual rainfall is back to normal. So they can turn off the hurricanes now.Geography lesson: Chappaqua is not Chappaquiddick.Somebody should tell the IMF not to lend more money to Indonesia until it gives East Timor to the East Timorese. Only that could get President Habibie's and General Wiranto's attention.400 is a nice round figure. 3,000 is even more rotund.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 9, 2001
Poor Bloomberg. Now he has to be mayor of New York. Kathleen has so much money, she should run in a bigger state. Hey, Bud, if it is not in Washington, it is not the national pastime. Things are so back to normal, we'll soon fuss about Gary Condit again. It's ridiculous to think that a team with a 5-3 record could go on to win the Super Bowl.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,Frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
All this rain has ended the drought for farmers, and water tables are rising again. But we are not quite back to normal. The USGS says more than 60 percent of Maryland's monitoring wells remain below seasonal norms. If the rain keeps up, hydrologist Wendy McPherson expects groundwater will keep rising: "P erhaps most of the water levels will be normal by the end of the month."
NEWS
March 15, 2000
Do you know? Snakes live all over the world, except in Iceland, New Zealand, the North and South poles, and one European country. What country is it? Hint: According to legend, St. Patrick drove all the snakes from this country. Answer: Ireland Learn more Visit the green tree pythons and other snakes at The Baltimore Zoo Reptile House. Read "Verdi," by Janell Cannon. 1. Snake skin is dry, not slimy. 2. The jaws of a snake can unhinge so they can swallow their prey headfirst, and whole!
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,Sun Reporter | November 20, 2006
MARC service on the Penn Line between Washington and Baltimore is expected to resume in time for this morning's commuter rush, a Maryland Transit Administration spokeswoman said yesterday evening. Service on the rail commuter line had been halted since Thursday evening when three empty CSX Corp. coal cars derailed between Bowie and Landover, damaging power lines and the tracks. Officials have said Thursday's heavy rains could have been a factor in the derailment. The derailment had thousands of Friday commuters scrambling for other means of transportation.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Recovery for the worst-hit areas of Maryland dragged on three days after the remnants of Sandy swept through, while the rest of the state got back to business as usual. In Crisfield, among the hardest-hit areas, some residents faced long-term relocation after storm waters made their homes uninhabitable, including about 100 who live in a public housing project. Elsewhere, tens of thousands of people remained without power Thursday evening, mostly in snowbound Garrett County. Service for some Verizon customers also was down.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
Perry Hall High School will maintain a heightened police presence until its principal determines that the campus is ready to return to normal, in the aftermath of a cafeteria shooting in which one student critically injured another on the first day of school. Two days after the incident, schools spokesman Charles Herndon said county officials are “debriefing and evaluating” but have not decided on whether to permanently beef up security or student counseling. “Right now, our attention primarily has been focused on the day-to-day recovery from this incident,” he said.
SPORTS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2012
At first glance, Pimlico Race Course 's infield didn't look quite as trash-filled as Yolanda Wade is used to seeing it the Sunday morning after the Preakness, despite record crowds this year. It was an illusion. With more tents than in previous years, there was more room for the detritus of 121,300 fans to hide, turning the annual clean-up into a kind of warped treasure hunt. The tents "camouflaged the trash," said Wade, a fill-in supervisor for Pritchard Sports & Entertainment who works at Pimlico and the Laurel Park racetrack year-round.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 16, 2012
It feels like there's a chill in the air, but this is really just a normal day for mid-March with temperatures struggling to break out of the 50s Friday. A cold front that slipped over the Baltimore area Thursday has stalled south of here and clouds have been stubborn to break, said Heather Sheffield, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va. That has kept temperatures from climbing much at all from the overnight low of 50 degrees at BWI Airport. It was 52 and foggy at BWI as of 11 a.m. and 55 at the Sun weather station downtown as of noon.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | March 16, 2012
Five days after suffering what his doctor called a mild heart attack Sunday, Salisbury coach Jim Berkman has only the tender area on his leg where a catheter was inserted as physical evidence of that procedure. “I feel all right,” Berkman, 52, said Friday morning from his home. “Actually, I'm a little antsy here. I'm not a guy who can sit around a whole lot. So I'm kind of getting stir-crazy right now.” The NCAA's all-time winningest coach with 395 victories, Berkman has not been allowed to return to the top-ranked Sea Gulls, who have captured nine national championships, including last year's title, under Berkman.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Amtrak service between Washington and New York and Philadelphia and Harrisburg, Pa., was back to normal for the evening rush hour Tuesday after an early-morning service disruption. About 30 Amtrak trains in the Northeast were delayed from 11 minutes to almost two hours Tuesday because of a low-voltage problem. The disruption began shortly before 8 a.m., and power was restored about an hour later. The cause of the outage was under investigation. The outage also disrupted MARC service on the Penn Line, which is operated by Amtrak.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 9, 1999
A hit-and-run accident on north Interstate 95 near Catonsville injured two people and tied up traffic for miles yesterday afternoon, said a spokeswoman for Maryland Transportation Authority Police.Lori Vidal said the vehicle that caused the accident -- its description was not released -- struck a 1996 Mercury and a 1996 Cadillac about 3: 12 p.m. Vidal said a man from New York, who was in the Cadillac, and a New Jersey woman, who was in the Mercury, were treated for injuries at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 15, 1999
BARRON'S REPORTS: "Edward Yardeni, Deutsche Bank, expects stocks to slide 30 percent or more this year. Then he sees a recession, after which `the U.S. will reach the Promised Land of economic growth with no inflation.' "And Alfred Goldman, A. G. Edwards & Sons, says, "After reaching 10,500, the Dow could drop to 9,600 near year end as people worry whether computers can meet the year 2000 challenge."WHO'S LEFT TO BUY? "This is a `blowoff' of classic proportions, the type that usually ends a bull market.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Timothy B. Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporters | February 12, 2010
Maryland dug, scraped, clawed and hauled its way back toward a semblance of normal life - at least on main roads - as a break in the weather gave residents and workers an opportunity to remove snow without more falling on their heads. Many secondary roads and neighborhood streets were still covered in snow - and might still be today and Saturday - after the second of two storms to pummel the state in a week added 20 inches or so in many areas. But interstates in the Baltimore area were fully cleared to the pavement, in some cases for the first time since Maryland's ordeal by flakes began late last Friday.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Frank Roylance,Frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
All this rain has ended the drought for farmers, and water tables are rising again. But we are not quite back to normal. The USGS says more than 60 percent of Maryland's monitoring wells remain below seasonal norms. If the rain keeps up, hydrologist Wendy McPherson expects groundwater will keep rising: "P erhaps most of the water levels will be normal by the end of the month."
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