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By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
For the past two weeks, potential city homeowners have been trying to get the answer to a seemingly simple question: Will those who buy houses at a special city tax sale have to pay delinquent city property taxes?Yesterday, they got an answer.The program will proceed as it was originally billed: 1,500 homes will go on the auction block May 12, and the buyers will not be saddled with either back taxes or liens.The confusion began March 24, when The Sun reported the plans to auction the homes free of liens and back taxes.
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NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she is throwing her support behind City Councilman William "Pete" Welch's bill calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation pending in a City Council committee, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for urban farmers who grow and sell at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables a year. The credits, which must be approved by the city's Cffice of Sustainability, are good for five years, but can be renewed for a total of 10 years, according to the bill.
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Susan Baer contributed to this article | April 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton paid $14,615 in back taxes and interest yesterday to cover previously undisclosed profits from Mrs. Clinton's 1980 commodities trading, the White House disclosed.In a tense White House briefing for reporters, lawyers for the first family conceded that earlier statements they had made about Mrs. Clinton's commodities deals were "inoperative" and that Mrs. Clinton had made a profit of $6,498 in 1980 that was never reported to the Internal Revenue Service.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
The city will conduct its annual tax sale this month in an effort to boost tax rolls, but some critics say it's a quick fix that contributes to one of Baltimore's most entrenched problems - vacant properties. City officials scheduled about 10,000 tax liens to go to auction this year. That's a small fraction of the 240,000 properties that owed money on property taxes or other city bills as of July 1, and less than half of the roughly 23,800 listed in advertisements in March. Those properties represented about $125 million in unpaid bills.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1995
Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier's name has been removed from the rolls of the city's tax deadbeats.The property tax bill on Mr. Frazier's Roland Park home, which was due last September, was paid yesterday -- a day after the commissioner's name was among the owners of 18,472 properties listed in legal notices as owing money for back taxes, water bills, alley paving and other services.The bill was paid yesterday after the commissioner's two-month-old final notice of the $9,364.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
To pay or not to pay, that was the question.For the past two weeks, potential city homeowners have been trying to get the answer to a seemingly simple question: Will those who buy houses at a special city tax sale have to pay delinquent city property taxes?Yesterday, they got an answer.The program will proceed as it was originally billed: 1,500 homes will go on the auction block May 12, and the buyers will not be saddled with either back taxes or liens.The confusion began March 24, when The Sun reported the plans to auction the homes free of liens and back taxes.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | June 26, 1993
For the third year in a row, the owners of Harrison's Pier V, the financially troubled Inner Harbor hotel and restaurant, have failed to pay their property taxes to the city, according to Baltimore tax records.They now owe $1.1 million in back property taxes with interest, according to city records.In addition, the owners owe the city $1 million in overdue payments on loans and on their lease of the prime waterfront land they rent from the city.The heavily subsidized hotel-restaurant, just east of the National Aquarium, opened in June 1989 with a 71-room inn and a waterfront restaurant resembling a lighthouse.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
State officials have revoked tax breaks from more than 550 homes in Baltimore after a Baltimore Sun analysis showed that hundreds of owners have been receiving the homestead property tax credit on multiple houses in apparent violation of state law. The owners now owe a total of $730,000 in additional property tax for the current year. Because the city also has revised tax bills for the past three years, the government's windfall could approach $3 million, assuming the owners pay the back taxes.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1996
A day after Julius Henson resigned as Baltimore's real estate officer, city lawyers are seeking to verify that he and his former wife owe $56,000 in unpaid taxes and other liens on an abandoned inner-city property.The city Law Department has reopened a long-dormant investigation into the back taxes on 702 Mosher St., a vacant, dilapidated rowhouse in West Baltimore.Property records list Mr. Henson and Brenda A. Henson, his former wife, as the owners of the Mosher Street house.Tax records show that they owe $8,800 for unpaid taxes dating to 1985 and bills for water and boarding up the house.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2004
The state comptroller got few takers for a pay-less-now deal to companies using Delaware shelters to avoid at least $78 million in Maryland taxes, interest and penalties. Of the 70 companies that responded by yesterday's deadline, one paid approximately $250,000 and three others said they want to take the settlement. About a dozen asked for more time or made counteroffers. State officials would not identify the companies. The comptroller's office said it's possible more letters postmarked yesterday will show up in the next few days.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
The state comptroller's office says Baltimore-based Constellation Energy owes more than $2.5 million in back taxes, interest and penalties. The comptroller's office filed a lien in December for money it says the energy company owes for the 2006 and 2008 tax years. Most of the amount is interest - the taxes claimed come to just under $440,000. "It hasn't been paid, and this is part of our normal process, to file a lien," said Christine Feldmann, a spokeswoman for the comptroller's office.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
The attorney for ousted Anne Arundel County Councilman Daryl D. Jones said Monday her client made a mistake in failing to file tax returns for several years, but she said that after serving his time, Jones is "fit to be a lawyer and he is fit to be a member of the County Council. " Attorney Linda Schuett made the case for Jones in Annapolis before retired Circuit Judge Arthur Ahalt, who will determine whether Jones will get his seat on the council back. Jones, a Severn Democrat who was first elected to the County Council in 2006 and re-elected in 2010, was charged in August 2011 with failing to file several personal and business tax returns between 2002 and 2007.
NEWS
BALTIMORE SUN MEDIA GROUP | April 3, 2013
Harford County Del. Mary-Dulany James said Tuesday she received a pledge from the state comptroller he will not to penalize businesses who have become victims of alleged financial fraud by a the Bel Air payroll company Accu-Pay. Accu-Pay is being investigated for collecting payroll taxes but allegedly not directing those taxes to the state and federal governments, according to prior news reports by The Aegis and The Baltimore Sun . After hearing from a large number of her constituents concerned that back taxes unpaid by the payroll company would be pursued for collection by the State of Maryland, James said in a news release she has been working with numerous state officials, including Comptroller Peter Franchot, to potential victims are protected from further financial burden.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 15, 2013
Representatives of business and labor groups urged Maryland lawmakers Friday to fall in line behind Gov. Martin O'Malley plan to raise taxes on gasoline to fund transportation projects. At a morning news conference in Lawyers Mall outside the State House, Greater Baltimore Committeee president Donald C. Fry said an increase in transportation revenue is necessary for Maryland's economic health and quality of life. Fry said additional funding is needed to continue work on such major projects as Baltimore's Red Line.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
The organizers of the first Baltimore Grand Prix — which ran up millions in debts to vendors and taxpayers — have begun paying their back taxes, an attorney for the closed business said Thursday. Steven D. Silverman, who represents Baltimore Racing Development, said company managers have entered into an agreement with the Maryland comptroller's office that will result in all of the nearly $600,000 in back taxes being paid. The company owes $567,594 to Baltimore in admissions and amusement taxes, and $23,838 in sales and use taxes to Maryland, according to state officials.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
State officials have revoked tax breaks from more than 550 homes in Baltimore after a Baltimore Sun analysis showed that hundreds of owners have been receiving the homestead property tax credit on multiple houses in apparent violation of state law. The owners now owe a total of $730,000 in additional property tax for the current year. Because the city also has revised tax bills for the past three years, the government's windfall could approach $3 million, assuming the owners pay the back taxes.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | November 14, 1990
MUSTANG, Nev. -- Joe Conforte, the nation's most famous brothel owner, joined yesterday the ranks of the thousands of people whose property is auctioned for back taxes each year by the Internal Revenue Service.Resplendent in a blue cashmere topcoat and red silk tie, Mr. Conforte cursed the IRS and signed autographs for a sympathetic crowd as his Mustang Ranch went on the tax collector's auction block.Minutes after the gavel first fell, Joe and Sally Conforte lost their celebrated ranch to a top bid of $1.49 million.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1995
Dozens of veterans groups across Maryland are threatened with the loss of their tax-exempt status and may owe the government hundreds of thousands of dollars in back taxes as a result of an investigation by the Internal Revenue Service.In an aggressive sweep that began in Maryland more than two years ago and is now being watched nationally, investigators with the IRS district office in Baltimore have audited at least 29 Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion posts across the state.The office has concluded that many of the organizations violated tax rules by allowing non-veterans to use their facilities -- a practice that it said inappropriately helped subsidize the costs for legitimate members.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
Eugene Schoene maxed out a credit card, drained his checking account and borrowed money from a relative. It was the only way, he says, to pay an unexpected property tax bill of gigantic proportions. His tab from the city Bureau of Treasury Management's Collections Division: $21,939. Schoene is part of a group of Baltimore homeowners who have recently gotten hefty property tax bills going back four years after revelations that they were improperly collecting "homestead" credits — a widespread problem highlighted in an investigation published Sunday by The Baltimore Sun. A 65-year-old schoolteacher, Schoene says he didn't know he was getting undeserved breaks on three rental homes in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2011
Since 2009 Patrick Tong has received "homestead" property tax breaks worth $18,000 on three rowhouses he owns in East Baltimore. He's quick to agree that he hasn't been entitled to a penny of it. Homeowners qualify for the break only on their principal residence, and Tong doesn't live in any of the three houses, which he has used as storage "for several years. " He says he didn't even realize he was enjoying the steep discounts until being informed recently by a reporter. "I would like to correct or rescind that," Tong, an ophthalmologist in Columbia, said in an interview.
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