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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,edward.lee@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
The friendship that bloomed between Ravens coach John Harbaugh and the Minnesota Vikings' Brad Childress was rooted in the meeting rooms and hallways of the Philadelphia Eagles' training facility when both men toiled as assistant coaches for Andy Reid. But that relationship was further enhanced outside the Eagles' building when the duo took part in long-distance runs during lunchtime. "I'd say we've shared a lot of the same kind of ideas about football over the years," Harbaugh recalled.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
This month, beleaguered General Motors announced that after 83 years, it was finally eliminating its Pontiac division in hopes of averting bankruptcy. This news catapulted me back to another time, when Pontiacs were Kings of the Road. I was also awash in Pontiac nostalgia because the first family car I really remember was a Pontiac. With the outbreak of World War II, automakers ceased production. With the return of peace, Americans were eager to take to the highways once again . The pent-up desire was fueled by cheap gas, big postwar salaries, and a desire to drive the fastest and most stylish models Detroit could provide.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 8, 2009
WASHINGTON -When Barack Obama was campaigning for president, he promised to enact legislation to prohibit the states from limiting the right to abortion. Now that Obama is in the White House and solid Democratic majorities are ensconced in Congress, opponents of abortion rights have been bracing for that and other major changes to abortion laws. But there are indications that what those groups dread most and some liberal voters eagerly anticipate as the rewards of victory might not come to pass - at least not yet. Democrats on Capitol Hill say that while they are committed to reversing several Bush administration policies with regard to abortion rights and family planning, they might hold off on pursuing the kind of expansive agenda feared by social conservatives.
NEWS
By Noam Levey and Noam Levey,Tribune Washington Bureau | December 22, 2008
After years of food poisoning episodes, tainted imports and unrealized promises of reform, the incoming Obama administration has been saying the embattled Food and Drug Administration would finally get what it needed to make the nation's food supply safer. But now, some of the leading champions of rebuilding the FDA and the food safety system acknowledge that big reforms are likely still years away. "This is an issue that will have to wait its turn," said Assistant Senate Majority Leader Richard J. Durbin, a Democrat from Illinois and longtime proponent of tougher food laws and a friend of President-elect Obama.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
He wants to change, said Jimmy Patsos, the hot-tempered men's basketball coach at Loyola College. There's a peace sign on the silver wrist bracelet that he has worn since June, and a muzzle on his mouth. "I'm trying hard to grow," said Patsos, the Greyhounds' fifth-year coach known for his fiery antics. "I haven't cursed an official this year. St. Augustine said, 'Patience is wisdom.' Want me to recite the Serenity Prayer? I say it every day." How goes the makeover? Perhaps Patsos still has some work to do. Early in Loyola's 82-72 loss to Cornell in the National Invitation Tournament Season Tip-Off on Tuesday in Boston, Patsos was slapped with a technical foul, his second of the season.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella | November 9, 2008
By now, Scott Gibbons Jr. expected to be on his way to earning six figures selling research equipment to academics and biotech and pharmaceutical firms. Instead, the 28-year-old is looking for work after losing a promising job he had for just three months. In August, he took a job as a territory manager for a Glen Burnie-based branch of the Swedish company Q-Sense. He was to help expand sales into the western United States. It was just what he was looking for, after four years of hands-on research and client development at Paragon Bioservices, a local biotech firm.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | October 27, 2008
Politics of late give us not the flavor of the month or the week but of the moment. The American people have recently been force-fed a steady diet of "financial crisis," and whether they admit it or not, it's a flavor that has been quite beneficial to Sen. Barack Obama's campaign. But flavors of the month, week or moment can be fleeting distractions from issues or threats that should permanently hold our attention. One such threat that has merited little or no notice from the media of late is terrorism.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Brent Jones and Frank D. Roylance and Brent Jones,Sun Reporters | June 11, 2008
The region's late-spring heat wave ended with a bang overnight as a barrage of showers and thunderstorms pummeled the area, cutting power, toppling trees and frightening drivers. More than 58,000 customers in Central Maryland had lost power by 10 p.m. as the storms rolled toward the Baltimore region, according to BGE. The wind and rain boiled up ahead of a cool front moving out of the Midwest, which is expected to reduce the humidity that has smothered the area since Saturday. However, the storms that brought the cooler weather were fierce - and nearly fatal.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | June 9, 2008
So much for the orderly transfer of power. Late yesterday afternoon, Lorena Ochoa worked her way through the crowd that was cheering her and chanting her name as she headed off Bulle Rock's 18th green and to the scorer's trailer. About 15 minutes later, Annika Sorenstam made the same trek, except the crowds were cheering even louder. The cheers were not for the victor. The victor was still playing, heading back to the 18th tee for the playoff to decide the McDonald's LPGA Championship.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 16, 2008
At yesterday's Alibi Breakfast, there was much of the latter but remarkably little of the former. Usually, this pre-Preakness event is an opportunity for big talk. Owners and trainers would make boastful predictions about how their horses would do in the race - or perhaps start dropping excuses should they perform badly - and politicians would use the event to promote the need to support the grand tradition of thoroughbred racing. Translation: Slots. Slots! SLOTS. But this year, with Kentucky Derby winner Big Brown far and away the favorite in Saturday's Preakness, most of the breakfast-goers speaking on behalf of the other horses in the race were not so much bragging as nearly conceding.
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