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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Baltimore's spending panel is asked Wednesday to approve about $4,700 in back pay for a city police sergeant who was suspended without pay after allegedly pointing a gun at her 20-year-old son's head. The Board of Estimates will vote whether to pay back salary to Robin Blackmon while she was suspended for about a month in 2013, under an agreement with the Police Department and the union. The board also is asked to provide back pay of about $105,000 to Carlos M. Vila, a former police sergeant accused of secretly recording a conversation with a judge.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A Middle River man who accused a Baltimore police officer of assault and battery will receive nearly $50,000 in a settlement approved Wednesday by the city's spending panel. Charles Faulkner accused Officer Daniel Hersl of battering his face with a police radio and his fists during an arrest Sept. 1, 2010, in the 1900 block of Wolfe St., according to court records and a settlement memo. The Board of Estimates approved the settlement without discussion, although City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young voted to reject the agreement.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
Harford County sheriff's deputies, who challenged a former policy that required them to arrive 15 minutes before roll call, will receive $115,569 in back pay from the county as a result of a settlement.Harford Circuit Judge Cypert O. Whitfill approved the settlement Friday between the county and 87 sheriff's deputies.The deputies sued in February 1990 over the policy of then-Sheriff Dominic Mele, who required them to work the extra 15 minutes without pay.Emory A. Plitt Jr., attorney for the county, said current Sheriff Robert E. Comes ended that policy as soon as he took office in December 1990.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Baltimore's spending panel is asked Wednesday to approve about $4,700 in back pay for a city police sergeant who was suspended without pay after allegedly pointing a gun at her 20-year-old son's head. The Board of Estimates will vote whether to pay back salary to Robin Blackmon while she was suspended for about a month in 2013, under an agreement with the Police Department and the union. The board also is asked to provide back pay of about $105,000 to Carlos M. Vila, a former police sergeant accused of secretly recording a conversation with a judge.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | July 26, 1991
CSX Intermodal, a Hunt Valley-based container transport company, has agreed to give 11 women a total of $57,000 in back pay because they were paid less than the company-set minimum salary for their jobs.The settlement is the company's second back-pay reimbursement agreement in eight months.Dan Murphy, a CSX Intermodal spokesman, said yesterday that the company used to hire people it considered to be unqualified for certain jobs, pay them less than the minimum for a year so they could be trained, then give them a raise.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | August 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Union leaders have succeeded in winning back pay for an additional 3,670 Social Security Administration (SSA) technical assistants, paralegals and translators who did not get paid overtime for more than a decade.The American Federation of Government Employees had taken legal action to force SSA to pay its workers time-and-a-half for working more than 40 hours a week.A ruling last week by an independent arbitrator from Baltimore raises the tally to 24,000 employees given back pay, after two years of grievance proceedings.
NEWS
June 9, 1991
Two Allegany County Jail guards fired after a highly publicized jail break last summer will get their jobs back, but will lose four months of pay and benefits for violating security rules.Gary Huffman and Michele Puderbaugh appealed their firings and asked for reinstatement with back pay. Allegany County Attorney John J. McMullen Jr. agreed they should be rehired but said each should get a 120-day suspension without pay or benefits.Mr. Huffman and Ms. Puderbaugh were on duty Aug. 29 when another correctional officer, Sandra Beeman, helped two inmates escape.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | March 1, 1992
Thirteen non-union deputies of the Harford Sheriff's Office have sued the state, seeking back pay they say is owed to them for coming into work 15 minutes early every day for roll calls.The deputies sayin the suit, filed Monday in Harford Circuit Court, that the state has violated Maryland's wage laws, which requires employers to providewages for hours worked."The deputies conferred a benefit to the state by working and providing services to the state, and have not been compensated for theirefforts," the suit says.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | May 10, 2007
Baltimore City Police Officer Jemini Jones, cleared of rape charges and awaiting trial on handgun charges, will receive nearly $60,000 in back pay. The city's Board of Estimates voted yesterday to approve the payment, for the period dating from Jan. 12, 2006, through April 8 of this year. Jones is currently suspended with pay. Before an April 9 suspension hearing, he was suspended without pay. Jones, 29, faces a Tuesday trial in Baltimore Circuit Court on two misdemeanor handgun charges.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1994
The Howard County Human Rights Commission has awarded a 48-year-old Spanish-American woman more than $26,000 in back pay from her former employer, saying she was wrongly fired because of her national origin.The commission ordered the 19 months of back pay to be paid to Carmen Keggins, a native of Spain who came to America when she was 15 years old. A three-member panel found 2-1 that she "experienced repeated personal ridicule" by the apartment manager at Allstate Management Corp.'s Great Oaks Apartments in Ellicott City, who continually teased her about her accent.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
President Barack Obama was expected to sign legislation late Wednesday to reopen the federal government 16 days after agencies were forced to close. Here's a look at what happens next: When will federal employees return to work? The Obama administration said federal workers should expect to return to work on Thursday. The White House encouraged workers to check the U.S. Office of Personnel Management's website for further guidance. What about back pay? The agreement passed by Congress on Wednesday provides retroactive pay to furloughed employees.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Like her colleagues at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Tiffany House packed up her desk last week hoping the government shutdown would last only a few days. But the single mom from Hyattsville will be in a position different from her co-workers when the agency reopens. Because House works for NOAA through a private contractor, she isn't likely to receive retroactive pay. As Congress considers legislation to provide back pay to an estimated 800,000 furloughed federal workers , far less attention has been paid to contract employees - many of whom work side by side with their agency counterparts.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
The House of Representatives approved a bipartisan bill Saturday to provide back pay to 800,000 furloughed federal employees when the government shutdown ends. If approved by the Senate, the proposal would limit the economic impact of the shutdown. That's particularly true in Maryland, where tens of thousands of federal workers have been furloughed since agencies closed on Tuesday. The House voted 407-0 to approve the measure. "Federal workers didn't cause this shutdown and they shouldn't be punished for it," said Rep. John Delaney, a Maryland Democrat who cosponsored the bill.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Charter pilot Martin Campanella said he thought he was doing the right thing when he refused to fly a plane he believed was unsafe. The Forest Hill resident said he was fired after he made an emergency landing with several passengers aboard a 10-seat corporate jet and then refused to fly the damaged aircraft to the charter company's headquarters. After getting fired, he said, he nearly lost his house and struggled with mounting anxiety and family tension. Now an administrative law judge for the U.S. Department of Labor decided the employer violated a federal law that prevents employment-related retaliation against air carrier employees acting in the interest of safety.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2011
Forty physical and occupational therapists who came to the United States through a visa program to work in 15 states, including Maryland, were awarded a total of $134,000 in back pay in a U.S. Labor Department case, the department announced in a statement Monday. Labor Department investigators found that Jackson Therapy Partners, of Orlando, Fla., failed to pay the workers the required wages for the period between their arrival in the country and their reporting to work. The workers came to the United States from the Philippines under the H-1B visa program.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
Five former ESPN Zone employees filed a class action lawsuit Monday against the company, alleging it had violated federal standards for notifying and paying workers who lost their jobs when the Inner Harbor location closed in June. The federal lawsuit claims that ESPN Zone, owned by Walt Disney Co., did not provide laid-off workers the mandated 60 days' notice of termination under the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification, or WARN, Act. The company has previously stated that it followed the federal regulations.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1999
Anne Arundel County is appealing a court decision that could cost it $600,000 in back pay for 67 clerical and blue-collar employees whose bosses in 1996 asked them to work longer hours without an increase in pay.Circuit Judge Eugene M. Lerner gave newly elected County Executive Janet S. Owens her first problem when he ruled Jan. 4 that the county owed money to workers in two employee unions, Locals 582 and 2563 of the American Federation of State, County...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Newly declassified government documents prove that the United States, after sending hundreds of Vietnamese commandos into North Vietnam during the 1960s, deliberately declared them dead, lied to their wives and then buried their story under a shroud of secrecy.Nearly 200 of those secret agents survived capture, torture and prison and are alive in the United States. They are asking the government for back pay -- $2,000 a year, without interest, for their prison time -- and help in getting 88 fellow commandos out of Vietnam.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2010
So you want to be a cop in Baltimore City? Your $42,289 starting salary will be competitive compared with those of your suburban neighbors — slightly higher than in Anne Arundel County, but a few thousand dollars lower than in Baltimore County. But just for the moment, think ahead. In 10 years with the city, your salary as a city beat cop will top out at just under $60,000. Your friends on the Baltimore County force will be pulling in more than $68,000 a year. Stay for 20 years?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | March 17, 2010
A Baltimore police officer who was suspended without pay in September after being accused of falsely claiming his car had been stolen to obtain an insurance settlement could get more than $11,400 in back pay, despite pleading guilty to a charge in the case in November. The Board of Estimates, the city's spending panel, is to vote today on whether to pay Officer Hikeen D. Crampton three months' salary. He is eligible because he pleaded guilty to a single misdemeanor charge of attempted theft - and not to more serious felony charges.
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