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By Judy Foreman Judy Foreman Judy Foreman | November 3, 2006
Christina Shimek, a senior at St. Bernard's High School in Fitchburg, Mass., is only 17, but she has already experienced more pain than many adults have to bear in a lifetime. A year ago, Christina said, she woke up one morning "in excruciating pain in my lower back and pelvic area. I was in tears." Frantic, her parents took her to the hospital, where doctors assumed the trouble was her appendix and took it out. But the appendix turned out to be normal. The pain persisted. She missed school for four months, had to repeat chemistry and missed an important rite of passage, her "junior ring ceremony," in which students get their class rings.
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FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | April 30, 1991
CHICAGO -- The world's foremost experts in dealing with aching backs have come up with a revolutionary new treatment.For up to 90 percent of all backaches, the doctors concluded, the best treatment is no treatment at all."Take two aspirin and don't call me in the morning" was the unofficial motto of the three-day conference, which attracted 25 doctors from 13 states, Canada and Sweden to Chicago last weekend."We're used to immediate treatment and response in this country," said Dr. James Weinstein, a spinal surgeon from the University of Iowa who organized the conference.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | April 4, 2004
A new desk job has forced me to sit for long hours at a time. My back is starting to pay the price. What can I do to keep from having a sore back at the end of the day? Who would have thought sitting still could be so stressful -- on the back, that is? Many of us have to tolerate eight or more hours of sitting in front of a computer. While teaching yoga might be a back-sufferer's dream job, not all of us are that lucky. Here are some tips desk-bound folks can use to ease back stress. Don't: * Cross your legs.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | January 4, 2004
I sleep on my side because it's most comfortable on my bad back. A friend suggested I sleep with a pillow between my knees. What would this do? We posed this question to Jennifer Kline, who is a physical therapist at Physiotherapy Associates in Lutherville. "The primary function of the pillow is to help maintain a neutral spine and pelvic alignment," says Kline. By keeping the top leg from pulling you into an unbalanced position, the pillow prevents stress on the back. If your top leg naturally stays where it is when you sleep, Kline says there's no need for the pillow.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 30, 2004
I've been having back spasms and have a five-hour plane trip coming up. Other than getting up and walking around, what stretches or exercises can I do to make myself more comfortable on the plane? We posed your question to Mike Clune, physical therapist and site coordinator at Health South Rehabilitation in Annapolis. Before you get on the plane, Clune suggests doing trunk twists and standing side bends -- with your arms at your sides, lean to one side, sliding your arm down your leg. On the plane, slip a lumbar roll or rolled towel between your seat and the small of your back.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1999
TORONTO -- Three days after telling team trainers that his lower back pain had dramatically eased, Orioles third baseman Cal Ripken was forced from yesterday's lineup against the Toronto Blue Jays and seems headed for the disabled list. Ripken will be examined today by a Cleveland orthopedist after a recurrence of the pain. Team officials were careful not to speculate on the extent of Ripken's latest problem, but a club source indicated it is a virtual certainty that Ripken will land on the disabled list for the first time in his 19-year career.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1998
OAKLAND, Calif. -- A long season caught up to Lenny Webster last night when a strained trapezius muscle forced the Orioles catcher to be scratched from the starting lineup in favor of Chris Hoiles.Manager Ray Miller was uncertain how long the soreness alongside his neck would prevent Webster from catching, but it is a virtual lock that Charlie Greene will receive his second major-league start this afternoon."I don't know if I slept on it wrong or it was the plane flight, but there's no way I can throw with it this way," said Webster.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2000
Cal Ripken would have made Eddie Gaedel proud. Almost as proud as his orthopedist. Participating in a packed afternoon fan forum at yesterday's FanFest at the Baltimore Convention Center, Ripken fielded a question about his myriad batting stances. A topic that has frequently irritated the Orioles third baseman throughout his career this time elicited a chuckle while bringing him out of his chair. "I've been working on a new stance. Want to see it?" At that, Ripken went into a convoluted crouch -- even for the Iron Man of 1,000 stances -- that included a deep knee bend with him hunched over so his elbows were no higher than his knees.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
Mike Mussina has a short and sweet answer to the run of nagging injuries that has taken the edge off what began as a promising season."It's the odd years. I got hurt in '89 in college and in '91 in Rochester and now it's '93 and it's one thing after another. I'm just kind of waiting for '94 to roll around," Mussina said yesterday.To be sure, Mussina hasn't given up on contributing to whatever success the Orioles have the rest of this 1993 season, and his 11-4 record still leads the pitching staff.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 29, 1995
GREENBELT -- A Rockville man sued Montgomery County police yesterday for $7 million, claiming they burst into his home and mistreated him and his family in a way that brought back memories of the 8 1/2 years he spent as a prisoner of war in Vietnam.Everett Alvarez Jr., 57, and his family alleged in a federal civil rights lawsuit that three officers -- suspecting underage drinking on the premises -- barged into their home and disrupted the birthday party of their 21-year-old son, Marc. "This is what I would expect over there," said Mr. Alvarez, meaning the former North Vietnam.
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