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Back Pain

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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Naomi Morgan reached her limit when her doctor recommended a third surgery for chronic back pain. Tired of being cut open only to have the pain return, Morgan, a 65-year-old nursing assistant, began looking for a less invasive and hopefully more effective way to treat her ailment, which she thinks started from lifting patients or moving furniture. She turned to a chiropractor, whom Morgan credits for helping her manage her back pain for the past 21 years with stretching, realignments and other treatments.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Angel, an aging 17-year-old giraffe born and raised at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore , was euthanized Tuesday, officials said. Angel long struggled with leg and back pain, which worsened recently, Dr. Ellen Bronson, the zoo's chief veterinarian, said in a statement. "While we were able to provide her with pain medicine which made her more comfortable, we realized that her quality of life was declining and the decision was made to euthanize her," Bronson said. She is the fourth older female giraffe to die at the zoo since 2008.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Just a few weeks after reporting to spring training camp and expressing confidence that his recent health issues are behind him, second baseman Brian Roberts is again dealing with back pain. Roberts, who has been sidelined since Monday after experiencing back spasms, had "trigger-point injections" Friday and is scheduled to have an MRI on Saturday. "We don't know. We'll just have to see," Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail said. "Fortunately, this is a doctor that he saw last year.
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
When Gene Shirokobrod's patients started asking the doctor of physical therapy to come home with them, he decided to find a product to recommend as an alternative for help with back and neck pain. But he couldn't find any product he thought was good enough to recommend, so he set out to make something. Shirokobrod reached out to Corey Fleischer, a mechanical engineer and co-founder of the Baltimore Foundery, to help him create the ARC, a product to relieve back and neck pain and retrain muscle.
NEWS
October 4, 1995
A local woman says she has turned her home into a "treasure chest of information" for sufferers of back pain.Margaret Hall, founder of the Back Pain Association of America, says she has developed an international network and database that can link primary care physicians and their patients with back pain medical specialists.The nonprofit organization, which operates out of Ms. Hall's home, has information and library material on medical findings.The group also sponsors a support group that meets at 7:30 p.m. the last Tuesday of each month at the Riviera Beach Library, 1130 Duvall Highway.
NEWS
By Rick Ansorge and Rick Ansorge,the colorado springs gazette | March 21, 1999
Sherry Brourman, a physical therapist, never suspected her back was out of whack until she had a baby, went dancing a couple weeks later, and suffered a "spondy." Short for spondylolisthesis, that's what happens when spinal vertebrae slip forward."I was in tremendous pain," Brourman says. "A lot of docs suggested surgery."Her response: No thanks.She turned to a colleague, who suggested exercises to strengthen her abdominal muscles, which assist back muscles. As she became stronger, she experimented with ways of walking that kept her back pain at bay.Eventually, the California-based therapist developed a system of gait corrections outlined in her 1998 book, "Walk Yourself Well: Eliminate Back, Neck, Shoulder, Knee, Hip, and Other Structural Pain Forever -- Without Surgery or Drugs" (Hyperion)
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | September 3, 1991
Q: Do you have any tips that may stop further attacks of lower back pain?A: Maintain good posture when standing, walking or running. Keep your backbone straight by pulling in your stomach and chin and holding your shoulders back.Maintain good posture when sitting by supporting your spine and supporting muscles.Lose weight to lessen the burden on the lower spine and supporting muscles.Exercise to strengthen the muscles of your back and abdomen. Ask your physician for instructions for appropriate exercises.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | May 6, 2005
For decades, people with low back pain were often told there was only one real solution to their misery: Spinal fusion, in which two or more bony vertebrae are surgically "welded" together in hopes of reducing pain and stabilizing the back. The trouble is, there has never been compelling evidence that this works, partly because new problems - such as stiffness and increased pressure above and below the fused vertebrae - often occur. And the risks are serious, including bleeding to the point of needing a transfusion and accidental nerve injury that leads to pain or weakness.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2006
I need a good machine for someone with lower back problems. I want to keep a good cardio workout. Would a NordicTrack walk-fit be any good? Ouch! I'm recovering from a lower lumbar sprain, myself, so I feel your pain. Still, your phrase "lower back problems" is raising red flags. To answer your question, I turned to one area expert, Chris Wood, a physical therapist and leader of the Good Samaritan Hospital Back School. We both had the same thought: Is your back pain chronic or acute? Consider that about 80 percent of Americans older than 20 will have at least one episode of debilitating back pain in their lifetimes.
SPORTS
By Peter May and Peter May,Boston Globe | July 3, 1991
BOSTON -- One of the surgeons who operated on Larry Bird's back said yesterday that there were no real surprises in the two-hour procedure.However, Dr. Alexander Wright took one look at Bird's beat-up lower back on the morning of June 7 and wondered to himself, "How did this guy do it?""I don't see how he played with what he had," said Wright, an orthopedic surgeon and chief of spine surgery at New England Baptist Hospital, who operated on Bird along with Dr. Gerwin Neumann, a neurosurgeon.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
A Baltimore County pain treatment center is resisting involvement in a probe into the deadly national fungal meningitis outbreak linked to tainted steroids last year. Baltimore Pain Management Center, which received some doses of the recalled medications, filed an objection Tuesday in federal court to a subpoena it received last month. Lawyers are seeking documents from 76 clinics across the country, including seven in Maryland, that received the drugs as they build a case against New England Compounding Pharmacy Inc., the Massachusetts facility that produced them.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Naomi Morgan reached her limit when her doctor recommended a third surgery for chronic back pain. Tired of being cut open only to have the pain return, Morgan, a 65-year-old nursing assistant, began looking for a less invasive and hopefully more effective way to treat her ailment, which she thinks started from lifting patients or moving furniture. She turned to a chiropractor, whom Morgan credits for helping her manage her back pain for the past 21 years with stretching, realignments and other treatments.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
Graham Motion can't help but hear snippets of news coming from Elmont, N.Y., where I'll Have Another is preparing for a shot at the first Triple Crown in 34 years. "It's great for the sport," the Fair Hill-based trainer said. "But for us, it's tough, too. The length that he won by at Preakness, we lost by that much last year. " Motion can take some solace in knowing the colt that gave him such a gallant run, Animal Kingdom, is finally headed back toward the race track.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Orioles right-hander Jim Johnson, the favorite to win the closer job this spring, said he believes he's no more than a week behind the other pitchers as today's first spring workouts commence Johnson is slated to have a throwing session on flat ground today as part of a “trunk stabilization” program to aid his recovery from some recent lower back pain. He said he began to experience some pain early last month. “There was no (specific) incident,” Johnson said. “I just went to see the doctor and it's no big deal.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Just a few weeks after reporting to spring training camp and expressing confidence that his recent health issues are behind him, second baseman Brian Roberts is again dealing with back pain. Roberts, who has been sidelined since Monday after experiencing back spasms, had "trigger-point injections" Friday and is scheduled to have an MRI on Saturday. "We don't know. We'll just have to see," Orioles president of baseball operations Andy MacPhail said. "Fortunately, this is a doctor that he saw last year.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Elizabeth Coxe's back pain was flaring up again. She'd been thrown from a horse about 35 years ago, and a new knee injury was aggravating the old hurt. Last fall, on the advice of friends, she sought and got relief from Dr. David B. Cohen, the Johns Hopkins orthopedic surgeon who was shot in the abdomen by the distraught son of another patient Thursday morning. "He sat down and explained so much to me in great detail," she said. "Today, some doctors take time, but many do not. He was so careful about explaining everything.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,Special to the Sun | April 4, 2004
Ron Ferguson loved his new mattress so much that after he bought it, he signed on to work at the store that sold it to him. Injuries and backaches plagued Ferguson, 60, for two decades. He couldn't tilt his head, raise his arm or roll out of bed. But after he bought his new mattress last year, he says, it was much easier to get up, get around and get to sleep. "It makes such a difference when you finally find the right one," he says of a good mattress. Americans spend an estimated one-third of their lives sleeping, and sleep is crucial to good health.
NEWS
August 26, 2005
More than 65 million Americans suffer low-back pain every year. Backaches are the most common reason for doctor visits, after cold and flu symptoms. In most cases, back pain is caused by the irritation of a nerve root near the spine, not by problems with the muscles, ligament or bone. - American Association of Neurological Surgeons
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Jeff Zrebiec | February 19, 2010
Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts has been dealing with lower-back pain, but Orioles officials said Thursday that they believe he'll be able to hit the ground running when full squad workouts begin next week. "He told me when he's here he'll be a full go," Orioles manager Dave Trembley said. There had been Internet speculation that Roberts suffers from kidney stones, but Trembley said he talked to Roberts and was told he had a back spasm. President of baseball operations Andy MacPhail seemed unconcerned that Roberts might come to camp with any restrictions.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Jeff Zrebiec and Baltimore Sun reporters | February 18, 2010
Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts has been dealing with lower back pain, but Orioles officials said Thursday that they believe he'll be able to hit the ground running when full squad workouts begin next week. "He told me when he's here he'll be a full go," Orioles manager Dave Trembley said. There had been some Internet speculation that Roberts is suffering from kidney stones, but Trembley said he talked to Roberts recently and was told that he had a back spasm. President of baseball operations Andy MacPhail also seemed unconcerned that Roberts might come into camp under any restrictions.
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