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By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Q: How early should I begin brushing my son's teeth? He's a year old and has six teeth. When should he see a dentist?A: Cleaning should start as soon as teeth appear. You can brush your son's teeth with a soft-bristled brush before he goes to bed. If he resists the toothbrush, you can use a soft wet cloth. The idea is to remove all food and drink, especially sweet and sticky matter, from the teeth to prevent caries (cavity) formation. And don't let him take a bottle to bed. If you have gotten into this habit and cannot break it easily, fill the bottle with water only.
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By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 15, 2013
Last week's buzz about the potential health benefits of spit-shining your baby's pacifier got me thinking about how much conflicting advice there is out there in the world of raising children. While it stands to reason that exposure to a moderate amount of germs might boost immunity and prepare baby for life in the real world outside the sterile nursery, I seem to remember also recently hearing about how swapping saliva with a baby (via spit-shining, sharing a spoon, straw or food, etc…)
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By Robert Cooke and Robert Cooke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2003
The Tooth Fairy may need to be more aggressive - or at least less of a cheapskate. New research shows that baby teeth may be more valuable than anyone imagined becase they contain fresh stem cells. "Shed teeth may be an unexpected, unique source for stem-cell therapies, including stem-cell transplantation and tissue engineering," said bone research specialist Songtau Shi and colleagues at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, in Bethesda and the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, in Adelaide, Australia.
NEWS
January 12, 2009
Old tooth study revived to look at radiation effects Questionnaires will soon be sent to thousands of men who donated their baby teeth half a century ago to scientists seeking to learn whether radioactive fallout in milk the donors drank as children affected their health later in life. It's the latest step in a study that began in the 1950s and 1960s at Washington University, but then stalled for decades. Fifty years ago, concern about atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons spurred a group of local scientists and other area residents to begin the project, then called the St. Louis Baby Tooth Survey.
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 1996
My 16-month-old daughter will not permit a toothbrush to pass her lips, with or without help. I'd appreciate any advice.Robin Smart,Guelph, OntarioLet your child brush your teeth first and then brush hers, turning an unpleasant task into play. Or buy her a toothbrush that jingles or glows in the dark. Or make up a silly song while brushing.Those are just a few of the ideas parents suggest to get a stubborn toddler to open wide at tooth-brushing time.Just make sure the job gets done, says Marvin Berman, a pediatric dentist in Chicago.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 15, 2013
Last week's buzz about the potential health benefits of spit-shining your baby's pacifier got me thinking about how much conflicting advice there is out there in the world of raising children. While it stands to reason that exposure to a moderate amount of germs might boost immunity and prepare baby for life in the real world outside the sterile nursery, I seem to remember also recently hearing about how swapping saliva with a baby (via spit-shining, sharing a spoon, straw or food, etc…)
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
Baltomommie wrote to ask for advice on how to help her preschooler stop grinding his teeth at night. She also wanted to know whether a sealant that dentists apply to children's teeth these days to prevent cavities would help protect his teeth from the wear and tear of grinding. I sent the question to Shari Kohn, a pediatric dentist at Dentistry for Kids in Hunt Valley and a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School. She counsels patience. "Many preschoolers grind their teeth," she wrote in an e-mail.
NEWS
January 12, 2009
Old tooth study revived to look at radiation effects Questionnaires will soon be sent to thousands of men who donated their baby teeth half a century ago to scientists seeking to learn whether radioactive fallout in milk the donors drank as children affected their health later in life. It's the latest step in a study that began in the 1950s and 1960s at Washington University, but then stalled for decades. Fifty years ago, concern about atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons spurred a group of local scientists and other area residents to begin the project, then called the St. Louis Baby Tooth Survey.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1998
Mouth open, teeth bared, the 2-year-old preens for the dentist. "She's doing great," said Mike O'Donnell, plunging half his arm -- and a flashlight -- into the patient's mouth.Nor does she flinch when O'Donnell begins smoothing her teeth with a metal file, like those found in machine shops.Scrrrunch, scrrrunch, scrrrunch. The file grates back and forth for 20 minutes as the patient -- a 900-pound horse -- stands idly in her stall at the Bowie Training Center in Prince George's County.So goes Mary Bo Quoit's first dental exam, a milestone in the career of the Maryland thoroughbred whose life is being chronicled in The Sun. Mary Bo Quoit, nicknamed "Miss Piggy," passes the checkup.
NEWS
By Muphen R. Whitney | October 30, 1991
Have you been out shopping for a horse lately?The last time I seriously looked for a horse, every one advertised was 15 hands, 2 inches tall and 7 years old.Times have changed.A friend of mine looking for a horse says it seems that every horse for sale is at least 16 hands, and no more than 5 years old. At least that is how they are advertised. The reality may be somewhat different from the ads.If size is really a crucial criterion for you, take along a measuring stick when you look ata horse.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
Baltomommie wrote to ask for advice on how to help her preschooler stop grinding his teeth at night. She also wanted to know whether a sealant that dentists apply to children's teeth these days to prevent cavities would help protect his teeth from the wear and tear of grinding. I sent the question to Shari Kohn, a pediatric dentist at Dentistry for Kids in Hunt Valley and a clinical instructor at the University of Maryland Dental School. She counsels patience. "Many preschoolers grind their teeth," she wrote in an e-mail.
NEWS
By Robert Cooke and Robert Cooke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2003
The Tooth Fairy may need to be more aggressive - or at least less of a cheapskate. New research shows that baby teeth may be more valuable than anyone imagined becase they contain fresh stem cells. "Shed teeth may be an unexpected, unique source for stem-cell therapies, including stem-cell transplantation and tissue engineering," said bone research specialist Songtau Shi and colleagues at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, in Bethesda and the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, in Adelaide, Australia.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Don Markus and Gary Lambrecht and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
GREENSBORO, N.C. - The Duke Blue Devils are 21-6, defending ACC champions for four years running, and two years removed from winning the national championship. They are also a young team with some obvious weaknesses. Great defense and making the extra pass have been trademarks of the Mike Krzyzewski era, but they have been in short supply at Duke this year. Duke concluded its regular season ranked seventh in the ACC in scoring defense (70.4), eighth in field-goal percentage defense (.434)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1998
Mouth open, teeth bared, the 2-year-old preens for the dentist. "She's doing great," said Mike O'Donnell, plunging half his arm -- and a flashlight -- into the patient's mouth.Nor does she flinch when O'Donnell begins smoothing her teeth with a metal file, like those found in machine shops.Scrrrunch, scrrrunch, scrrrunch. The file grates back and forth for 20 minutes as the patient -- a 900-pound horse -- stands idly in her stall at the Bowie Training Center in Prince George's County.So goes Mary Bo Quoit's first dental exam, a milestone in the career of the Maryland thoroughbred whose life is being chronicled in The Sun. Mary Bo Quoit, nicknamed "Miss Piggy," passes the checkup.
NEWS
By Michael S. Derby and Michael S. Derby,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 8, 1997
It seemed a typical enough classroom exercise: a graph depicting how many teeth a class of third-graders has lost over a school year.But instead of lined paper, rulers and pencils, this graph was an interactive creation, with the third-graders who had lost teeth forming a living line, each representing a point of data on it.Such exercises are among the innovative techniques that helped earn Glyndon Elementary School teacher Linda Gosson the Presidential Award...
NEWS
By Elisabeth Orr and Elisabeth Orr,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 4, 1997
He carries boxes and helps in the cafeteria. He fixes equipment, counsels students, referees games, and, according to Martha Dickinson, a second-grade teacher who has worked with him for more than 20 years, he "is a great spender -- the only person I know who can make a penny stretch a mile."Spring Garden Elementary Principal Larry Bair has even been known to pull loose teeth.After 32 1/2 years, 28 as an administrator in Carroll, Bair is finishing his last week of school."He will not be replaced," said Carol Pfoutz, a secretary at Spring Garden.
NEWS
By Michael S. Derby and Michael S. Derby,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 8, 1997
It seemed a typical enough classroom exercise: a graph depicting how many teeth a class of third-graders has lost over a school year.But instead of lined paper, rulers and pencils, this graph was an interactive creation, with the third-graders who had lost teeth forming a living line, each representing a point of data on it.Such exercises are among the innovative techniques that helped earn Glyndon Elementary School teacher Linda Gosson the Presidential Award...
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Don Markus and Gary Lambrecht and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
GREENSBORO, N.C. - The Duke Blue Devils are 21-6, defending ACC champions for four years running, and two years removed from winning the national championship. They are also a young team with some obvious weaknesses. Great defense and making the extra pass have been trademarks of the Mike Krzyzewski era, but they have been in short supply at Duke this year. Duke concluded its regular season ranked seventh in the ACC in scoring defense (70.4), eighth in field-goal percentage defense (.434)
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 1996
My 16-month-old daughter will not permit a toothbrush to pass her lips, with or without help. I'd appreciate any advice.Robin Smart,Guelph, OntarioLet your child brush your teeth first and then brush hers, turning an unpleasant task into play. Or buy her a toothbrush that jingles or glows in the dark. Or make up a silly song while brushing.Those are just a few of the ideas parents suggest to get a stubborn toddler to open wide at tooth-brushing time.Just make sure the job gets done, says Marvin Berman, a pediatric dentist in Chicago.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Q: How early should I begin brushing my son's teeth? He's a year old and has six teeth. When should he see a dentist?A: Cleaning should start as soon as teeth appear. You can brush your son's teeth with a soft-bristled brush before he goes to bed. If he resists the toothbrush, you can use a soft wet cloth. The idea is to remove all food and drink, especially sweet and sticky matter, from the teeth to prevent caries (cavity) formation. And don't let him take a bottle to bed. If you have gotten into this habit and cannot break it easily, fill the bottle with water only.
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