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Baby Jane

FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 5, 2007
A whacked-out serial killer, obsessed with the number three and telephone terrorism. A seminary student who may be his next victim. A deranged aunt who layers on her makeup with a trowel. Riddles that, if answered properly, might keep death at bay. Phone Booth. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Se7en. Saw. Most of the fun to be had with Thr3e is to spot the movies from which it cribs. Beyond that, what one has is a conventional psychological thriller that cheats too often and depends on actors determined to play only one note.
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NEWS
May 7, 1998
Chatichai Choonhavan,76, a cigar-smoking wine-lover known as Thailand's "no problem" prime minister during the now-collapsed economic boom, died of cancer complications yesterday in Bangkok.Maidie Norman,85, an actress who played a black servant in "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" but rewrote her lines to get rid of "old slavery-time talk" and give the role more dignity, died Saturday in San Jose, Calif. She had lung cancer.Dr. Emily Mudd,99, a one-time college dropout who trained to be a landscape architect before becoming a pioneering marriage and family counselor, died Saturday at her home in Haverford, Pa.Natasha Gelman,86, who with her husband, Jacques, amassed a group of 20th-century European paintings and sculptures and who was a friend and patron of Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and many other Mexican painters, died Saturday at her home in Cuernavaca, Mexico, after a long illness.
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 27, 1991
NEW YORK -- From designers attending a reception in New York for the fashion press given by the Council of Fashion Designers of America, I repeatedly heard the same refrain:Designers don't dictate anymore. They listen to customers.So which one of you has been telling them women want to wear crinolines?I ask because the rest of us would like to find you and express our profound appreciation, perhaps by stuffing several yards of tulle down your throat.Stiff, frilly petticoats have returned in abundance.
NEWS
January 4, 1997
Wesley Addy, 83, whose acting career ranged from Shakespeare to soap operas, died Tuesday in New York.Mr. Addy launched his stage career with a 1935 appearance with Orson Welles in Archibald MacLeish's "Panic." His Shakespearean roles included a stint as Benvolio in "Romeo and Juliet," with Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh.Mr. Addy spent most of the 1940s and 1950s playing leading roles on Broadway. He often starred opposite his wife, Celeste Holm, his sole survivor. His film credits included "The First Legion," "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane" and "Hush Hush, Sweet Charlotte."
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | January 17, 1991
FEBRUARY, one of the months when Nielsen rates all the television markets, is considered the most crucial of the sweep months because networks expect winter weather to keep people home watching TV. Indeed, there is little planning beyond February as all the networks, for competitive reasons, are holding their scheduling decisions until the last moment these days. So most of the big events we know are coming up on television are set for next month, though, of course, events in the Persian Gulf could play havoc with these schedules.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 17, 1998
Remember your first?For me, it was "Mary Poppins." Definitely "Mary Poppins." My distant but distinct memory is of me and Darcy Gibson, my lifelong best friend, attending "Mary Poppins" in Des Moines, Iowa. We were 4 years old.As the audience streamed in, we realized something was missing: C.J., Darcy's 2-year-old brother. Darcy's mother dispatched us to look under seats and headed for the lobby. Suddenly, we heard laughter coming from the front of the theater. There, a tiny head could be seen, bobbing over the first row. It was C.J., marching back and forth across the stage in front of the screen, to the approbation of the crowd.
NEWS
April 14, 2006
June Pointer, 52, the youngest of the Pointer Sisters - known for the '70s and '80s hits "I'm So Excited," "Fire" and "Slow Hand" - died of cancer Tuesday at a hospital in Santa Monica, Calif. The four sisters grew up singing in the choir of an Oakland church where their parents were ministers. Bonnie and June formed a singing duo and began performing in clubs around the San Francisco Bay area. Anita and Ruth later joined the group. Their self-titled debut album was released in 1973, and the song "Yes We Can Can" became their first hit. They followed up with "That's A Plenty," which featured an eclectic mix of musical styles ranging from jazz to country and pop. They won a Grammy Award in 1974 for best country vocal performance by a group for the song "Fairytale."
NEWS
January 9, 2000
To celebrate Read Across America, reading specialist Bernice Cullinam created a list of authors and illustrators everyone should know. The list was meant to introduce children, and the adults who care for them, to newer books in the field of children's literature. That's why well-known classics, such as Beatrix Potter, Lewis Carroll, A.A. Milne and E.B. White are not included. They are enduring masterpieces that every child should know. If you've not yet introduced your child to them, start today.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1998
Some people are just plain nasty.Such as Martha Baring, as played by Jessica Lange in "Hush," a mother-in-law-from-hell film co-written and directed, with more good intentions than good sense, by newcomer Jonathan Darby.She's not a full-bore loon. She's not a knife-wielding maniac. And she's not blessed with the sort of supernatural powers that would allow her to die at a crucial moment, only to be revived in time for the final, blood-curdling act.Nope, she's just mean. And perhaps a tad too devoted to her son.We're introduced to Martha the morning after her son, Jackson, and his girlfriend, Helen (Johnathon Schaech and Gwyneth Paltrow)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 14, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:THE MEMORIES LINGER ON -- Elvis Presley may have died in 1977 (or maybe not, depending on your conspiracy leanings), but this week's nightly Elvis salute on Channel 54 is showing his memory is certainly alive and well. The station says Monday's screening of Presley's 1968 "Comeback Special" generated more than a 50 percent increase in the usual ratings. Still to come are "Aloha From Hawaii," at 8 tonight, an internationally telecast special which may have been seen by a billion people in 1973, and Friday's film, "Fun In Acapulco," from 1963.
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