Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaby Food
IN THE NEWS

Baby Food

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | August 12, 1994
London. -- It probably passed most of the world by that last week was World Breast-Feed Week. It almost did me, and why should you be different? Unless you were one of the mothers of 4,000 babies that UNICEF estimates die every day because they're not breast-fed, but bottle-fed with commercial baby food.Twenty-one years ago, Derek Jellife, an expert on infant nutrition, published an article in a British medical magazine entitled ''Commerciogenic Malnutrition.'' At that time breast-feeding wasn't a proper subject for dinner-table discussion, much less for great campaigns.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Stokely Baksh, For The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahh! We've all been there, wedged uncomfortably in between two people on a flight, cramped legroom, anxious to reach our destination and that adorably squishy baby you waved to earlier has now turned into a shrieking creature like something out of Mothra vs. Godzilla. If I could go back in time to those flights where I let those little angels get to me, I'd tell myself  "Get over it! That kid's parents have it way worse. At least you aren't also dodging spit up, avoiding blowback poop or inventing new ways of changing diapers in the world's tiniest bathroom.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | September 16, 2007
The old joke says parents carry pictures of their children in their wallets - where their money used to be. Babies are expensive. But many parents spend far more than they need to. The reason is easy to guess - having a baby is an emotional event in life. It's common for couples, especially first-time parents, to develop the attitude, "Only the best for my baby." Where emotion is involved, poor spending choices often follow. "Marketers take advantage of that," said Kimberly Danger, author of 1,000 Best Baby Bargains.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Recent studies have shown that many commercial baby foods are lacking in nutrition and full of things your baby doesn't need, like sugar and preservatives. But is homemade worth the hassle? We weighed the pros and cons. Pro: It's easy. Pureeing carrots is a far cry from making coq au vin . Steaming, mashing, stirring - that's as complicated as baby food needs to be. Con: It's time consuming. Yes, it does take longer to make your own food than to buy it. But take a tip from Baltimore dad Chi Yan, who would make a big batch of pureed fruits or veggies, then freeze single servings in ice cube trays for quick meals for his son, Henry.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
When it comes to mealtime with baby, are the French onto something that we're missing in the States? Jenny Carenco's “Bébé Gourmet: 100 French-Inspired Baby Food Recipes for Raising an Adventurous Eater” suggests that might be the case. The author is the founder of the French baby food company Les Menus Bébé, a second career inspired by her experiences feeding her first child. Carenco's cookbook contains lunch, dinner and snack recipes appropriate for babies 4 months old and up. There's everything from pumpkin, sweet potato and vanilla soup to risotto Milanese with butternut squash and sage to lemon-yogurt cake.
FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Recent studies have shown that many commercial baby foods are lacking in nutrition and full of things your baby doesn't need, like sugar and preservatives. But is homemade worth the hassle? We weighed the pros and cons. Pro: It's easy. Pureeing carrots is a far cry from making coq au vin . Steaming, mashing, stirring - that's as complicated as baby food needs to be. Con: It's time consuming. Yes, it does take longer to make your own food than to buy it. But take a tip from Baltimore dad Chi Yan, who would make a big batch of pureed fruits or veggies, then freeze single servings in ice cube trays for quick meals for his son, Henry.
NEWS
December 12, 1990
Charlyne Varkonyi, food and home writer for The Sun, has received the top food/nutrition award in the national JCPenney-Missouri awards competition for lifestyle and feature writing.Her story, which appeared May 16, 1990, in A La Carte, showed how baby-food manufacturers were exaggerating the results of a medical study so they could gain an exemption from proposed federal legislation requiring full nutritional labeling. The manufacturers argued that they should be allowed to keep the amount of fat, cholesterol and fiber off the label because well-meaning parents would be misled and would underfeed their children.
FEATURES
By Ginger Munsch Crichton and Ginger Munsch Crichton,Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | July 8, 1992
Hey, baby, what's for dinner?Might be organically grown rice and lentils, with a carrot-parsnip mix on the side and guava juice. Maybe even a papaya-pineapple dessert.In the $1 billion-a-year baby food industry, organic and Hispanic foods are among the latest items competing for pint-size palates.These consumers may not have much to say about the variety of foods available. But they do eat a lot of them -- an average of 500 jars during the eight to 12 months that a child usually is given prepared baby foods.
NEWS
January 23, 2000
A food processor is the most efficient kitchen tool for chopping or pureeing bulky ingredients. However, if the work bowl is too large to process small amounts effectively, a mini work bowl or a conventional or immersion blender is a better choice. An immersion blender is ideal for pureed soups, baby food or smoothies. Immersion blenders are highly portable and reduce clean-up, since the blades go directly into the cooking pot, mixing bowl or glass. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | July 7, 1991
Look for more processed foods to show up with "organic" on the label, predict industry insiders.Processing takes organics beyond the fresh-produce aisle and serves up the ready-made convenience Americans crave. And it solves a problem: Fresh organic produce that's often not picture-perfect, partly because it's not treated for long shelf life.Washington's Cascadian Farm is an industry leader, producing many processed products from organically grown fruits and vegetables that are sold nationally.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
When it comes to mealtime with baby, are the French onto something that we're missing in the States? Jenny Carenco's “Bébé Gourmet: 100 French-Inspired Baby Food Recipes for Raising an Adventurous Eater” suggests that might be the case. The author is the founder of the French baby food company Les Menus Bébé, a second career inspired by her experiences feeding her first child. Carenco's cookbook contains lunch, dinner and snack recipes appropriate for babies 4 months old and up. There's everything from pumpkin, sweet potato and vanilla soup to risotto Milanese with butternut squash and sage to lemon-yogurt cake.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 25, 2013
Moms are feeding their babies solid foods before their bodies are developed enough to handle it, a new study by the Centers For Disease Control has found. The American Academy of Pediatrics has long advised that babies don't get solid food until they are four to six months-old. But 40 percent of the nearly 1,300 mothers surveyed in the study said they introduced food before that. Babies are better developed at 4 to 6 months of age, including having the ability to hold their heads up and open their mouths for food.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | November 18, 2012
OK The Walking Dead , I see you, doing your thing. This Sunday night's episode was by no means earth shattering, but in keeping with the style of season three, there was plenty to satisfy us fans and keep us coming back next week: humans were killed (albeit inconsequential humans), questions were answered (Where is Carol? Who was on the phone?) and the plot was advanced. We were left with Michonne strolling up to the prison fence, injured and covered with a camouflage of zombie entrails, and carrying a supermarket basket full of powdered baby formula.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Kristy Skocik and her husband, Chris, signed up for a community-supported agriculture plan last winter to ensure they would have farm-fresh fruits and vegetables in the spring for the baby they were expecting. Disappointed when that weekly plan was canceled, the Columbia couple searched for an alternative and found one, in Friends and Farms, that they say has exceeded their expectations. "We hardly ever have to go to the grocery store now because we also get dairy, meat, eggs and bread," said Skocik, a NASA engineer now working part time from home to care for 9-month-old Samantha.
NEWS
May 29, 2012
Regarding your recent article on the health benefits of Hollywood-hip practices, there actually is a rationale for mothers who pre-masticate food for their infants ("Extreme mothering, celeb-style," May 24). There is a marked absence of a certain salivary enzyme in infants during the period from birth to 3 to 5 months. This enzyme is needed to digest complex carbohydrates found in grains such as rice, wheat, oatmeal, etc. It's the digestive enzymes in the mother's saliva that matters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
The Gypsy Queen food truck is having a baby. Annmarie Langton and Tom Looney have purchased the old Curbside Cafe truck and will be launching a slightly pared down version of the popular cafe on wheels.   "We're super excited," Gypsy Queen co-owner Looney said. The truck is set to launch within 10 days, he added. "We just got all of our permits. " The new truck is tentatively named The Little Gypsy, but the name has not been painted on yet. If you have a suggestion for a name, leave it here.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | June 21, 1991
London. -- Fifteen years ago the Paris-based international Herald Tribune published an editorial article that asked in its first line, ''Does Nestle make chocolates and kill babies?'' It caused a minor European storm and, after a follow-up article, its author was threatened with arrest if he should ever set foot again on Nestle's home turf, Switzerland.Nestle is the world's biggest manufacturer of baby food, and the controversy has swirled around its elegant headquarters on the vine-covered shores of Lake Geneva ever since.
FEATURES
By T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. and T. Berry Brazelton, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | July 5, 1998
Q.Earlier this year, my daughter and her husband installed bunk beds in their 2-year-old son's room in preparation for the birth of their second child. They gave Jake a couple of months to make the change to a "grown-up" bed and allowed another month to put his dismantled crib out of sight before the baby arrived and the crib was set up in her room.However, Jake refused to give up his crib. As the birth date approached, his parents sought the advice of their pediatrician on how best to persuade him to make the change.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
Organic products and those without preservatives and harsh processing remain big business in the United States — with $81 billion in sales last year — despite a tough economy. Sales in stores, online and in practitioners' offices were up 7 percent from the year before, according to the trade publication Natural Food Merchandiser, which conducts a survey every year. The public consumed items that included foods and herbal supplements, health and beauty items, and pet supplies. During the next few days, about 25,000 buyers from groceries, drugstores and big-box retailers, as well as distributors and food service operators at hospitals and colleges, will scour the aisles at the Natural Products Expo East, the largest show of its kind on the East Coast, to find the Next Big Things to put on store shelves.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2010
Cynthia Brooks is not about to let a recession, dwindling donations or a disconnected phone stop her from helping the needy. The executive director of the Bea Gaddy Family Center in East Baltimore is keeping the doors open and moving forward with plans to serve Thanksgiving dinner to 50,000 people despite the center's financial woes. The center, founded by Brooks' mother, the late city councilwoman, is barely meeting the ever increasing demand for help. The floor-to-ceiling shelves for canned goods are often empty, and the leased refrigerated containers, which were mostly bare, are gone because the center couldn't afford them.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.