Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaby Bottles
IN THE NEWS

Baby Bottles

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Erica C. Harrington and Erica C. Harrington,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1996
A fire that began when an Ellicott City man fell asleep early Friday while sterilizing baby bottles displaced 15 people from the Town & Country Apartments and sent a firefighter to the hospital with minor injuries, fire officials said.Young Jin Yun, 35, fell asleep about 1 a.m. Friday while the bottles were on the stove in his apartment in the 8700 block of Town & Country Blvd., said Deputy State Fire Marshal Ted Meminger.The man awakened to an apartment filled with smoke and left with his wife and 9-month-old daughter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Elizabeth Heubeck, For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
Josephine Grant never knows what she'll find at her doorstep when she comes home. The biggest surprise came when she returned from school one day last spring to a stack of 10 enormous cardboard boxes, each containing dozens of baby bottles. No one in her family could use them. But nearby, there was a great need for the bottles, and Grant knew what to do. This "hobby" of Grant's started when she was 13. "My little cousin was born with Goldenhar syndrome, was always in and out of the hospital, and never had anything to do while in there," she said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
The Maryland House of Delegates gave preliminary approval Saturday to measures aimed at removing phosphorus from the Chesapeake Bay, mercury from old cars and toxins from baby bottles. Over nearly four hours of debate on scores of bills, lawmakers also gave final approval to a measure requiring police agencies to improve record-keeping on SWAT teams in light of a Berwyn Heights police raid last summer in which the town mayor's dogs were killed. A similar bill has already passed the state Senate.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Homeowners in danger of foreclosure now have a right to mediation, schools and police can communicate more freely about gang activity, and civil court filing fees increase — all part of the package of more than 150 new state laws that take effect today. Marylanders are unlikely to be affected by most of the changes, which include local liquor board tweaks and a slew of legislative study panels and reports. The new legislation likely to have the broadest impact, the ban on handling cell phones will driving, doesn't take effect until Oct. 1. That's the date when the majority of the laws passed by the General Assembly this year take effect.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | April 19, 2008
While an American manufacturer of popular plastic water bottles announced it would remove bisphenol A from its products, the Canadian ministry of health said yesterday that the chemical could pose a serious health risk for infants. The Canadian agency said it will likely ban BPA from baby bottles. Bisphenol A is found in millions of plastic products, including can linings, DVDs and plastic bottles. It has come under increasing fire in recent months; some researchers say the chemical can cause a wide range of health problems, including breast and prostate cancer, infertility, diabetes and brain damage.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | February 3, 2010
Lawmakers in Annapolis are being asked to ban products containing two chemicals that have triggered serious concerns about toxicity. On Tuesday afternoon, the House Health and Government Operations Committee aired HB33, which would ban the sale, manufacture or distribution of children's toys or child-care articles such as baby bottles made with bisphenol-A, or BPA. The bill, sponsored by Del. Jim Hubbard, a Prince George's County Democrat, would...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 23, 2010
As scientific evidence mounts against bisphenol-A, a chemical used in plastic baby bottles, soup cans and other containers, many states - including Maryland - are starting to take action to limit the chemical ahead of any federal regulation. The states are responding to some scientists, consumer groups and now even federal officials who have been sounding alarms about the chemical better known as BPA, which has been linked to developmental disabilities in children and reproductive problems in women.
FEATURES
By Julie Deardorff and Julie Deardorff,Chicago Tribune | July 26, 2007
In what may be a first among mainstream parenting books, an updated version of Baby 411 tells parents to stop using polycarbonate plastic baby bottles that contain the controversial chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA. Most baby bottles on the market are made from the hard, clear, shatterproof plastic, such as Avent, Dr. Brown's, Evenflo, Gerber and Playtex. But "until we get more answers about their safety, we do not recommend using polycarbonate bottles," wrote co-authors Denise Fields and pediatrician Ari Brown.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2004
What do you get when your company develops a product that boosts a baby's IQ? A bonanza, that's what. Just two years after hitting U.S. store shelves, baby formula enriched with Martek Biosciences Corp.'s patented nutritional oils have grabbed nearly 60 percent of the $3.5 billion domestic market for infant formula. Three out of five baby bottles are filled with formula that includes the Columbia company's additive, and that's important, doctors say, because a significant share of babies get their nutrition from formula, not mother's milk.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
A bill to ban the chemical bisphenol-A from baby bottles and infants' cups passed its final hurdle in the General Assembly on Thursday. The Senate passed the BPA bill 46-0, after the House passed an identical bill last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley hasn't reviewed the legislation, but a spokesman said he doesn't believe the governor would have objections. If the bill is signed, Maryland would become the fourth state to ban the chemical linked to developmental problems in young children, reproductive troubles in women and other diseases.
NEWS
April 13, 2010
The General Assembly considered hundreds of bills during its 90-day session, and adopted only a fraction. Here's a sample of what got accomplished, and what didn't: Baby bottles Lawamkers approved a ban on the chemical bisphenol-A from use in baby bottles and infan' cups passed its final hurdle in the General Assembly on Thursday. The prohibition would taking effect in 2012, making Maryland the fourth state to ban the chemical linked to developmental problems in young children, reproductive troubles in women and other diseases.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
A bill to ban the chemical bisphenol-A from baby bottles and infants' cups passed its final hurdle in the General Assembly on Thursday. The Senate passed the BPA bill 46-0, after the House passed an identical bill last week. Gov. Martin O'Malley hasn't reviewed the legislation, but a spokesman said he doesn't believe the governor would have objections. If the bill is signed, Maryland would become the fourth state to ban the chemical linked to developmental problems in young children, reproductive troubles in women and other diseases.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 23, 2010
As scientific evidence mounts against bisphenol-A, a chemical used in plastic baby bottles, soup cans and other containers, many states - including Maryland - are starting to take action to limit the chemical ahead of any federal regulation. The states are responding to some scientists, consumer groups and now even federal officials who have been sounding alarms about the chemical better known as BPA, which has been linked to developmental disabilities in children and reproductive problems in women.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | February 3, 2010
Lawmakers in Annapolis are being asked to ban products containing two chemicals that have triggered serious concerns about toxicity. On Tuesday afternoon, the House Health and Government Operations Committee aired HB33, which would ban the sale, manufacture or distribution of children's toys or child-care articles such as baby bottles made with bisphenol-A, or BPA. The bill, sponsored by Del. Jim Hubbard, a Prince George's County Democrat, would...
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
The Maryland House of Delegates gave preliminary approval Saturday to measures aimed at removing phosphorus from the Chesapeake Bay, mercury from old cars and toxins from baby bottles. Over nearly four hours of debate on scores of bills, lawmakers also gave final approval to a measure requiring police agencies to improve record-keeping on SWAT teams in light of a Berwyn Heights police raid last summer in which the town mayor's dogs were killed. A similar bill has already passed the state Senate.
NEWS
By Deborah L. Shelton and Deborah L. Shelton,Chicago Tribune | September 17, 2008
CHICAGO - The debate over the safety of a chemical ubiquitous in the lives of Americans took center stage at a scientific hearing of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration yesterday as federal officials, scientists and health advocates gave vastly different assessments of the effects of exposure to bisphenol A. Bisphenol A, commonly known as BPA, is used extensively in epoxy resins lining food and beverage containers and in polycarbonate plastics used...
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | January 12, 1992
Q: We collect early fireplace cooking implements and would like to know where we can find a certain type of wrought-iron toaster designed to bake flat breads on the hearth. Also, can you tell us how such breads were made?A: Horseshoe-shaped wrought-iron toasters were made to stand the hearth like easels. They were used in Scotland as early as the 17th century for baking bannocks, or Irish flat bread; the dough was placed on a narrow ledge at the bottom of the piece and positioned before the fire.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | June 11, 2008
WASHINGTON - Parents don't need to throw away plastic baby bottles containing the chemical BPA, government scientists told Congress yesterday, despite mounting concerns about toxic side effects. "We do not see a need to change baby bottles," Norris Alderson, a Food and Drug Administration official, said. Michael A. Babich, a chemist at the Consumer Product Safety Commission, agreed that there was no reason to stop using the bottles. The two officials said evidence of danger from BPA was too limited to corroborate concerns.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.