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NEWS
March 25, 2013
While I am in complete agreement with Allen St. Pierre of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws as to the desirability of reducing penalties for marijuana possession, I take issue with his physics ("Advocates for legal marijuana take first steps," March 20). He states that "the fulcrum on all of this [liberalization of marijuana laws] rests on the baby boomers. " I would say, more accurately, that the baby boomers are the fulcrum. We remember, of course, that a fulcrum is a stationary pivot point upon which a lever rests, and against which it exerts force to create movement.
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NEWS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
As baby boomers ebb out of the workforce and into retirement, financial advisers are helping wind down their clients' careers by preparing them for soon-to-be-reduced incomes. Meet Cyndi Hutchins, Bank of America Merrill Lynch's director of financial gerontology — one of the country's first such positions at a financial management firm. Her recent appointment marks the company's first foray into the science of aging. Hutchins works with other Merrill Lynch financial advisers to manage their clients' transitions into retirement.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 16, 2012
All baby boomers should get tested for hepatitis C, the virus that can lead to liver disease, cancer and death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . One in 30 boomers is infected and most don't know -- read about that in this Sun's story on hep C . In making the recommendation, CDC officials believe raising awareness and testing will avert more disease and deaths. It's now the fastest-rising cause of cancer-related deaths and a leading cause of liver transplants.)
NEWS
By Sheldon Caplis and Diane Bell McKoy | June 9, 2014
America is facing three pivotal points in its history: a workforce vacated by Baby Boomer retirements, a lack of teachers to prepare youth for college and give them the skills required for new and global economies, and a swiftly changing racial demographic (becoming "majority-minority" before the end of this decade). How we navigate these issues is critical. They impact whether we as a state will be able to meet our leadership and workforce needs and whether we will have teachers with the skills and cultural understanding of the communities they serve, which include a growing population of children of color and those living in under-resourced areas.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
When Alan Shackelford's ankles would swell up, he brushed it off as another sign of getting older — only to find out it was a symptom of something much worse. The 59-year-old Windsor Mill man was shocked when his doctor recently diagnosed him with hepatitis C. Even more disturbing to the IT specialist at Johns Hopkins University was that he had probably been living with the disease for years. "I was completely freaked out that this had happened to me and I probably had this for 35 to 40 years," Shackelford said.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 3, 2011
My husband and I have been stashing money in our 401(k)s since they were introduced in the 1980s, but, despite the miracle of compounding interest, he is still convinced we will be working at McDonald's - and eating our only meal of the day off of the steam table there - when we retire. Like most "pre-retirees," we have been paying more attention to our health (weight, diet and exercise), but my husband is still planning to go swimming in shark-infested waters wearing a steak around his neck as soon as he begins to feel knee or hip pain, because there is nothing he dreads more than a long, slow slide into decrepitude.
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | August 30, 1991
The road to 40 has been a dizzying ride for baby boomers.George McGovern to George Bush. Free love to monogamy. Non-materialism to yuppiedom. Drug taking to drug testing.Why such radical shifts? Growing up, mostly. As people age, they simply become more conservative. And since the baby-boom generation makes up a third of the population, the slightest shift in its collective values attracts an enormous amount of attention: When a huge number of people experiment with pot or buy BMWs, the nation takes notice.
NEWS
By Mary Sanchez | June 18, 2007
It's no secret that Americans are in denial when it comes to aging. Sales of Botox are booming, tummy tucks and eyelid lifts are common, and anti-aging creams and gels are multibillion-dollar businesses. So it should come as no surprise that Americans find it difficult to grasp that our population as a whole is maturing, that the median age is slowly climbing upward. This has serious consequences for our economy and our culture, and it also bears on the immigration issue now being debated.
NEWS
By Eugene Steuerle | May 24, 1999
MOST BABY boomers, no matter what their politics, once identified strongly with John F. Kennedy's dictate to "ask not what your country can do for you."Now that they have come into full power in the labor force, business, Congress and the presidency, it is ironic that their legacy could well be a federal government almost solely devoted to meeting their retirement needs, at the expense of other national priorities.This legacy is as firmly rooted in the Republican Congress' budget proposals as it is in the president's or current law.Under all, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid expenditures would rise from about 40 percent of federal revenues today to almost 80 percent in 50 years.
NEWS
By Marilyn Geewax | July 11, 1995
BABY BOOMERS often complain that they must work harder than their parents did to stay in the middle class. They're right about the long hours -- Americans are working more than at any time since World War II.Today, 20.9 percent of the labor force works more than 49 hours a week, according to the U.S. Labor Department. In 1973, only 15.9 percent of workers logged such long weeks. About 10 million Americans, or 8.7 percent of the work force, clock more than 60 hours a week nowadays.Harried employees resent their long hours and wistfully recall that their fathers were able to support families on 40-hour weeks.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
A popular living choice for retiring baby boomers is fast becoming what's known as "55-plus" communities. Such an option is found in a lovely Colonial-style home in the pet-friendly Highland Woods development, just minutes from Main Street in Annapolis, at 714 Darlow Drive. Priced at $539,000, this two-story, vinyl-sided home with a basement is one of just 25 built in the suburban neighborhood and faces a community park. "I like the home's open floor plan that some people call the 'open concept,'" said listing agent Wilma Richards with Long and Foster Real Estate's Annapolis office.
NEWS
November 24, 2013
The recent articles about America of Nov. 22, 1963 and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy have been wonderful; it was such an important time in American history. However, one very universal memory has been left out from the baby boomers just getting out of school on the East Coast on that day. We typically found out about the shooting as we were leaving school, at the locker room or school bus, and we all remember going home to a mother in tears in front of an old black and white television.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Susan Reimer 's thoughtful column ("How much are they worth to you?" Oct. 9) reminded this reader how fortunate my Baby Boom generation has been that the federal government provides so many services for our elderly parents. Without them, we would have long ago had to start making even more agonizing choices between pursuing our dreams and caring for Mom and Dad. These programs have made us all, boomers and the World War II generation, much freer in our personal lives. Conservatives often deride federal programs like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, and the state programs that supplement them, as "entitlement programs," implying that the increased government power and taxes necessary to run them somehow make us less free.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 25, 2013
Beverly Jones was my life coach before she was anybody else's life coach. Back at Ohio University, she was a young administrator and I was a reporter on the student newspaper, The Post. We were the rare woman in our jobs, and she talked me in off the ledge many times. Bev went on to Georgetown Law School and eventually worked as a lobbyist on Capital Hill. A golden parachute allowed her to re-invent herself as an executive coach, helping professionals figure out where they, like her, will be next.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
I am a member of the baby oil generation. Half a century ago, we spent our summers at the pool, slick with a kind of fluid magnifying glass that turned our skin red, then brown. You wouldn't have been caught dead without a suntan back in the day. And you were in a hurry to get it done so you would spend the rest of the summer glowing in your sundresses and your two-piece bathing suits. There was an art to "laying out," as we called it. We were so focused on rotating our exposure to the sun - like rotisserie chickens on a spit - that we barely paid attention to the boys.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Susan Reimer 's recent column on Social Security Dilemma completely missed the mark ("Don't blame boomers for Social Security dilemma," April 22). Neither Baby Boomers nor the lack of new workers has anything to do with the current Social Security dilemma. The problem lies with Congress and the politicians in Washington. Social Security was originally set up in the 1930s as a "pay as you go" retirement system. Money was collected from workers and supposedly invested and saved for their retirement.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 24, 2011
"Near-retirees," as those of us of a certain age are often called, are getting a lot of mixed messages. Fortune magazine reports that companies are hanging onto their baby boomers because they fear a brain drain - a loss of skills and institutional knowledge. In 1985, the magazine says, about 11 percent of people over 65 worked full- or part-time. This year, the figure is more than 18 percent. However, while unemployment among older workers is 6.2 percent, significantly below the national rate of 9.1 percent, it is double what it was three years ago. And the U.S. Government Accountability Office says that those 55 and older who lose their jobs wait an average of three times longer than they did in 2007 - from 11 to 31 weeks - before they find work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
I know we have become a nation of such short attention spans and long-term addiction to instant gratification that asking viewers to spend even an hour with a documentary that could change the way they see the world is probably a fool's errand. But this fool is asking -- no begging -- you to see "Hard Times: Lost on Long Island," an HBO documentary premiering at 9 Monday night and repeating throughout the month on HBO and HBO2. I have not seen anything on-air, online or in print that so deftly nails one of the most important and least reported stories of our economic and political lives in this presidential election year.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 22, 2013
We baby boomers get blamed for just about every economic hiccup, because there are so many of us. And our children are particularly furious because they believe the crisis in Social Security, which may affect their ability to retire, can be laid at our feet like kindling for a burning at the stake. They are convinced we boomers, with our outsized appetites and sense of entitlement, are going to consume everything on our way to the cemetery, right down to the amount of ground we leave for those who die after us. But data from the Social Security Administration itself, provided by chief actuary Stephen Goss, demonstrates that boomers are not the pig-through-the-python that we have been described as being.
NEWS
By Stephen H. Morgan | March 27, 2013
When economic times are tough and the daily headlines remind us of our nation's deficit challenge, it's easy to use misinformation and anecdotes of abuse to demonize certain entitlement programs. Unfortunately, this has the unintended effect of stereotyping whole groups of people as lazy, unmotivated or, worse yet, committing intentional fraud. First, it was those living on the edge of poverty and relying on Medicaid for health care and other critical support services who took the hit. Now it's the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)
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