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By Marilyn Lewis and Marilyn Lewis,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 6, 1991
The number of births in the United States increased so dramatically in the first seven months of 1990 that even scientists and social planners who expected an increase are being caught by surprise."
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 12, 2011
Last Sunday, my brother and I went to the Catholic church in our hometown to make arrangements for a funeral Mass for my mother, Rose — more familiar to readers of this column as the former Rose Popolo — and, for the first time in all the years since I lived there and served as an altar boy, I didn't recognize a single soul in the pews. What I did recognize were names engraved on a wall — the men and women who had donated things the church needed for its reconstruction after a fire in 1954.
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NEWS
By Antonia C. Novello | October 19, 1998
THE BABY boom generation has left its mark on society throughout the 50 or so years it has been around.From Davy Crockett caps to the Beatles, from Earth shoes to minivans -- the boomers' impact has traced their different phases in life.Now, this generation is slowly but surely approaching the golden years, and there can be no doubt that the group that once defined youth culture in this country is going to redefine what it means to be elderly as well.Even before the boomers become senior citizens, their very presence is starting to raise serious questions about programs currently in place to care for the elderly.
HEALTH
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2010
As Kyra Vocci leaned in to blow out her birthday candles last January, she closed her eyes tight and issued one wish — for a baby. The smoke had barely cleared when an earnest snow began falling on the Baltimore area in early February. It fell, and fell and then fell some more — until it became a full-on snowstorm, and then another. Vocci, a budget analyst at the Johns Hopkins University, didn't make it in to work that week and neither did her husband, Chris, a chef at the Baltimore Country Club.
HEALTH
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2010
As Kyra Vocci leaned in to blow out her birthday candles last January, she closed her eyes tight and issued one wish — for a baby. The smoke had barely cleared when an earnest snow began falling on the Baltimore area in early February. It fell, and fell and then fell some more — until it became a full-on snowstorm, and then another. Vocci, a budget analyst at the Johns Hopkins University, didn't make it in to work that week and neither did her husband, Chris, a chef at the Baltimore Country Club.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1993
No lights. No air conditioning. Husbands and wives cooped up together for days.What to do?Hundreds of Floridians found something to pass the time after Hurricane Andrew. And nine months later, Broward County is greeting Andrew's legacy: a baby boom.Around the county, many hospitals are reporting a surge in births in May, nine months after the storm.While some of the boom stems from the area's expected population growth, many of the extra births are to families who have moved from hard-hit Dade County.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | December 18, 1990
BEIJING -- China, facing a baby boom it does not need, is stepping up enforcement of its one-child-per-family policy in populous rural areas.Although China's family planning campaigns have averted an estimated 200 million births over the last 20 years, top birth-control officials yesterday announced they will increase efforts to limit the rapid growth of the world's largest population -- growth that is straining the nation's resources and stalling its...
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Benjamin Spock's enduring gift is the comfort he provided parents who came to a new job with no training.In his landmark 1946 book, "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care," the tall, graceful Yankee sent parents a simple but profound message: There really were answers to their questions about raising children. Until then, pediatricians used intuition when it came to behavioral or developmental issues or ignored them.Spock's book allowed parents to feed their babies when the babies cried, not according to an arbitrarily imposed doctor's schedule.
NEWS
April 12, 1991
Hear the boom? It's the combined roar of crying, gurgling and the squeak of baby-stroller wheels in the nation's new baby boom, which continued in earnest last year.The estimated 4,179,000 births in 1990 were the most in nearly 30 years. Only at the postwar baby boom's peak, between 1956 and 1961, were the number of births in this nation ever higher, according to the National Center for Health Statistics."They may have to reopen some schools . . . the ones that they closed in the 80s," says Stephanie J. Ventura, a demographer with the center, which is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
?Every day, I will be making choices that will help me live or lead me down a path of early death.? The Rev. Frank M. Reid III, pastor of Bethel AME Church, after his heart surgery Article, PG 1b Up next Tomorrow 'Scandal' Notes on a Scandal stars Cate Blanchett as a teacher whose troubles only begin after an affair with a student. in Movies Today Saturday Posters Tips on starting a vintage poster collection. in Go Today Sunday Baby boomers Stories of two area women, one born the first day of the baby boom in 1946, one at the end, in 1964.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
Amid the largest crop of American newborns since the baby boom, a new federal report reveals some worrisome changes in recent childbirth patterns across the nation. Rates of births to teens and to unwed women have ended years of declines and headed higher, setting new records, according to the report on birth trends in 2006 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At the same time, the percentage of women receiving prenatal medical care in their first trimester, a trend that had been improving, turned lower.
NEWS
By David Donadio | September 25, 2008
To everyone born after Woodstock: In the past week, government has proposed to commit hundreds of billions of dollars to an unprecedented financial bailout, and we're the ones who will pay for it. If you've been disappointed by how tight the feds have been with your money of late, Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. and the Democratic Congress have just the plan for you. "U.S. Democratic lawmakers said they would act quickly on a $700 billion rescue plan for financial companies," Bloomberg reported, "while demanding that the legislation limit compensation for executives of companies that will benefit."
NEWS
August 19, 2008
Baby boomers will demand care As The Sun has noted, we're beginning to feel the impact of an aging baby boom generation ("Senior population soars," Aug. 7). Thanks to medical advances, seniors are living longer, more active lives. But aging boomers require more services from hospitals and health care practitioners. And health professionals are in increasingly short supply. In less than a decade, we could face a nursing shortage of 10,000. And the state is faced with a particular lack of primary care physicians and severe shortages in many other medical specialties ("Family doctors called scarce," Aug. 12)
NEWS
By Richard Alba and Richard Alba,Los Angeles Times | June 20, 2007
The revived immigration bill will again be up for debate in the Senate this week. Amendments will be heard, and compromises made. One element that needs that extra look is the way the bill would profoundly shift the priorities of U.S. immigration. For more than half a century, the core principle of the system has been family reunification. The proposed bill would create instead a point scheme dominated by "human capital" considerations - those who have certain educational credentials and labor-market qualifications would be first in line.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,[Sun Reporter] | January 14, 2007
Endlessly characterized as brimming with disposable income and determined to remain young, America's 78 million baby boomers are becoming more diverse as they age. In 2007, the oldest boomers, born in 1946, will turn 61. The youngest, born in 1964, will turn 43. The stories of two Baltimore-area boomers, Yvonne Christie and Mary Murphy, reveal the range of experiences that define and also separate the first and last members of this generation, especially the...
NEWS
January 11, 2007
?Every day, I will be making choices that will help me live or lead me down a path of early death.? The Rev. Frank M. Reid III, pastor of Bethel AME Church, after his heart surgery Article, PG 1b Up next Tomorrow 'Scandal' Notes on a Scandal stars Cate Blanchett as a teacher whose troubles only begin after an affair with a student. in Movies Today Saturday Posters Tips on starting a vintage poster collection. in Go Today Sunday Baby boomers Stories of two area women, one born the first day of the baby boom in 1946, one at the end, in 1964.
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | August 30, 1991
The road to 40 has been a dizzying ride for baby boomers.George McGovern to George Bush. Free love to monogamy. Non-materialism to yuppiedom. Drug taking to drug testing.Why such radical shifts? Growing up, mostly. As people age, they simply become more conservative. And since the baby-boom generation makes up a third of the population, the slightest shift in its collective values attracts an enormous amount of attention: When a huge number of people experiment with pot or buy BMWs, the nation takes notice.
NEWS
May 21, 2004
THE LEGS ARE SHOT. The vision's gone. The belt needs to be loosened a notch -- or two. Memory seems to be hanging in there (but did we mention the legs are shot?). The baby boom is not so babyish anymore. The oldest are staring at 60. The rest? Let's just say they're deep into retirement planning. So it is with overwhelming generational pride that baby boomers can rejoice in the athletic feats of Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Randy Johnson. The rangy left-hander tossed a perfect game Tuesday.
NEWS
By CONNOR ADAMS SHEETS and CONNOR ADAMS SHEETS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2006
Long before it was officially designated the 21st of Maryland's 23 counties in 1851, Howard County was considered prime real estate. By 1699, Thomas Brown, an early explorer and settler, had distinguished himself as one of the first American settlers to lay eyes on the county's rolling hills - which now have been booming with development and growth for decades. The county's quaintest town, Ellicott City, was founded four years before Howard's most famous son, Charles Carroll III, signed the Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
By LEONARD STEINHORN | February 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The oldest members of the most mocked and vilified generation in our nation's history, the baby boomers, are turning 60, making it a good time to reflect on the boomer legacy. Are boomers just a collection of self-absorbed, latte-drinking narcissists who threw a tantrum in the 1960s and haven't stopped whining since, as conventional wisdom suggests? Or is there more to the story than this well-worn media caricature? To pundits, the verdict already is in: Boomers are the antithesis of their "Greatest Generation" parents, who fought the good war, braved the Depression and sacrificed for all. To Greatest Generation chronicler Tom Brokaw, his heroes "never whined or whimpered," unlike boomers who "have forgotten the example of their parents."
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