Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaby Bells
IN THE NEWS

Baby Bells

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 18, 1991
The former telephone behemoth, Ma Bell, got into trouble in part because of its size, business practices and the fact that government regulations shut out competition. The result was the 1980s birth of seven "Baby Bells," the regional telephone companies. Now there is disturbing evidence that the children have the same anti-competitive appetites as their mother:* In May 1991, Georgia's Public Service Commission found Bell South had designed its voice message service to deny competitors equal access and impede market growth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 7, 2006
AT&T's proposed $67 billion purchase of BellSouth triggers reasonable consumer fears about the return of the old Ma Bell phone monopoly. But in the long run, this deal could be more about the Internet - more about the even more troubling prospect of a loosely regulated near-monopoly on the digital services to your home and wireless devices. Or in other words, the demise of the Internet as we know it. The need for scale, we're told, is the driver of consolidation in the phone business, of the merging of the Baby Bells some two decades after the courts broke up Ma Bell.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 4, 1993
There's about as much ferment in the legal and strategic planning offices of communications companies these days as in their historically productive research labs. As quickly as the engineers come up with technological breakthroughs, the marketers think up ways to convert them into products and the lawyers figure out how to avoid legal obstacles.A federal court in Alexandria, Va., has raised the stakes considerably for regional telephone companies and local cable TV systems. In a case brought by Bell Atlantic, which owns C&P Telephone Co., the court ruled the phone companies had a First Amendment right to sell their own programs over their networks.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 2, 2002
CORPORATE bosses make bad choices all the time. But occasionally a top executive makes a decision so historically wrongheaded, so disastrously fateful, that it haunts his successor's successor's successors and harms shareholders and employees for decades. One error for the ages came in the early 1980s, when IBM honcho John R. Opel allowed an obscure contractor called Microsoft to own the license for the operating system in IBM's new personal computer. By essentially exploiting IBM's brand without paying for it, Microsoft soon eclipsed its business partner, which lost hundreds of billions of dollars in potential sales.
NEWS
July 16, 1994
Ten years is a century in the telecommunications world. When the nationwide Bell telephone monopoly was broken up by U.S. trustbusters in 1984, the industry was emerging from what now looks like its horse and buggy era. Ma Bell, more formally known as AT&T, was forcibly separated from her children, the local telephone companies. They were merged into seven regional monopolies familiarly known as the Baby Bells, including this area's Bell Atlantic. Ten years later, Ma doesn't much resemble her old self, the babies have grown up and the world they function in has changed drastically.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | October 31, 1994
No longer content to offer merely an information pipeline, Bell Atlantic Corp. has forged an alliance with two other phone companies and a leading Hollywood talent agency to produce the programs that will flow through it.Philadelphia-based Bell Atlantic, the company that provides telephone service to most Marylanders, announced today that it will link up with NYNEX and and Pacific Telesis Group to create a "virtual network" covering six of the nation's top...
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | January 5, 1994
NEW YORK -- In what amounted to a declaration of war on the nation's local telephone companies, MCI Communications Corp. said yesterday that it is building a $20 billion telecommunications network that will allow consumers to choose their local phone company just as they now choose their long-distance carrier.Drawing a parallel with MCI's successful battle a decade ago to introduce competition for long-distance telephone calls, which used to be monopolized by AT&T, MCI officials said the "Baby Bells" would find their local monopolies challenged over the coming years.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
The race to create a nationwide network for wireless communications accelerated yesterday as Bell Atlantic Corp. and its Northeastern counterpart, Nynex Corp., announced plans to merge their cellular businesses into a super-regional giant with a ravenous appetite for new acquisitions.The cellular network the companies propose will sprawl down the Eastern Seaboard from Maine to South Carolina, with a portion of New Mexico and Arizona.It's a huge territory, but nowhere near as big as the ambitions of the deal's architects.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, stepping into the midst of the competition over cable TV programming, agreed yesterday to decide whether local telephone companies have a constitutional right to offer cable service to their customers.If the court finds such a right, the seven regional "Baby Bell" companies could prepare their own cable-TV programs -- or have subsidiaries do so -- and transmit them to homes and businesses over local phone lines.That would provide direct competition with existing cable TV operators, the kind of challenge that the National Cable Television Association and its member companies have resisted for years.
BUSINESS
By Boston Globe | July 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A coalition of long-distance companies including AT&T, Sprint and MCI vowed yesterday to fight the four Bell operating companies that are trying to enter the long-distance and telecommunications manufacturing arena."
NEWS
By Mark N. Cooper | October 2, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Local telephone competition in Maryland, where Verizon Communications has managed to perpetuate a virtual monopoly, seems no closer than it was four years ago, when the federal Telecommunications Act was adopted. Currently, consumers in only two states -- New York and Texas -- enjoy the benefits of local and long-distance telephone competition. It is clear why it took so long to open up those phone markets: the "Baby Bells" tried mightily to get into long-distance without first truly allowing competitors into their local markets.
NEWS
May 11, 1999
BY ACQUIRING MediaOne Group Inc., AT&T has dramatically regained access to most of America's households.When AT&T's monoply was ended in 1984, the goal was to promote competition in the nation's telecommunications industry. Then, when Congress deregulated the phone industry three years ago, it believed that unfettered competition among dozens of companies -- AT&T, the regional Bells, wireless and cable companies -- would provide Americans with leading-edge products at competitive prices.That goal has yet to be realized, and AT&T's access to 60 percent of the nation's households through cable television lines may further stymie competition.
NEWS
August 5, 1998
THE LATEST round of telephone mergers fulfills only half the mandate of the ambitious 1996 Telecommunication Act.Opening the industry to marketplace forces has led to a raft of mergers and consolidations, but the promised opportunities for competitive choices, improved service and lower prices have been slow to arrive.Seven regional operating companies (the Baby Bells) emerged after the court-ordered breakup of AT&T. The theory had been that these companies would provide competition in local and long distance service.
NEWS
May 15, 1998
AT&T's breakup 14 years ago and the enactment of the 1996 Telecommunications Act were intended to spur competition and innovation in the nation's telephone and telecommunications service. The proposed merger of two Baby Bell companies, SBC Communications Inc. and Ameritech Corp., raises the possibility that the nation won't fully realize the full benefits of telephone deregulation.Vigorous competition exists in certain telecommunications markets, such as long distance and wireless communications.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston DTC and Lyle Denniston DTC,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In a case likely to set an important antitrust precedent, the Supreme Court agreed yesterday to consider a plea by a Bell Atlantic Corp. subsidiary to block a lawsuit that targets that company's dealings with suppliers in New York state.The subsidiary, Nynex Corp., and two affiliated companies are facing a potential damage verdict for allegedly engaging in a "group boycott" against Discon Inc., a New York company that removes outmoded telephone equipment from central office facilities.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1998
The nation's chief telephone regulator yesterday blasted a recent court decision that could open the long-distance market to regional local-service phone companies.Federal Communications Commission Chairman William Kennard called the decision "unequivocally bad for the consumers of America."On Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Joe Kendall, in Wichita Falls, Tex., ruled that the Telecommunications Act of 1996 unconstitutionally prevents the regional local-service companies, known as Baby Bells, from entering the $80 billion long-distance market.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 26, 1994
HOLLYWOOD -- The Creative Artists Agency is expected to join with three regional Bell companies as early as next week in forming a venture to offer video entertainment programming for telephone customers on the East and West Coasts, movie-industry executives said yesterday.The venture would involve Bell Atlantic Corp., Nynex Corp. and Pacific Telesis, which have hired Michael Ovitz, the most powerful talent agent in Hollywood, to organize an enterprise that could provide movies and programming for as many as 46 million businesses and homes.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For years, Harold H. Greene has lived, good-naturedly, with a reputation as the man who caused America's telephones to stop working.Judge Greene, a genuinely funny man in private (and sometimes in public, too), can appreciate the sarcastic humor behind that complaint.He is a federal judge with a thick skin, who comfortably hears and tells jokes on himself about the decision nine years ago to break up the telephone company -- in fact, the entire Bell System. That decision brought competition -- and sometimes chaos, static, malfunction or maddening silence -- to telephone service.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 3, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose on the first trading day of 1998 as bond yields fell to four-year lows and the dollar rose to a 5 1/2 -year high against the yen.A report showing restrained growth in U.S. manufacturing last month sparked the bond rally and reinforced expectations for slow inflation and low interest rates in 1998.Traders sold yen on concern that Japan isn't moving swiftly enough to spur consumer spending or keep more of its financial institutions from going bankrupt.The Dow Jones industrial average rose 56.79 points to 7,965.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- AT&T Corp.'s merger with any large local telephone company is "unthinkable" because it would undermine competition among long-distance and local telephone systems, FCC Chairman Reed Hundt said yesterday.Hundt's comments come as AT&T and SBC Communications Inc. consider a $50 billion transaction that would combine the largest long-distance company with the biggest Baby Bell. Last week, AT&T Chairman Robert Allen said there were several advantages to buying one of the Baby Bells, the regional telephone companies shed by AT&T more than a decade ago.But such a combination "yields a resulting concentration that is unthinkable," Hundt said in a speech at the Brookings Institution in Washington.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.