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NEWS
By Steven I. Simmons | February 13, 1996
NEW YORK -- Two years ago, I was diagnosed with AIDS. Since then, I have often experienced the mind-numbing fear and desperation that leads some people to submit to bizarre medical experiments. The now-famous AIDS patient Jeff Getty, for example, allowed bone marrow from a baboon to be transplanted into his own weakened body. Convinced that this procedure represents his only chance for survival, and that it offers hope for the rest of us, Mr. Getty has staked his very life on a gamble he is sure to lose.
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TRAVEL
January 24, 1999
Baboon hitches a ride; A Memorable TripBy Melanie Pefinis, Special to the SunVisions of wildlife and expansive sky rolled before me as I headed along the famed Garden Route on the South African coast.While on location, filming a documentary series throughout the region, my colleagues and I absorbed the rich landscape and natural surroundings. I was especially struck by the presence of monkeys in public -- almost as common as squirrels here in the States.As we drove, windows down, we spotted a group of baby baboons, the size of my hand, playing in the road ahead.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 26, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- It is after hours and the AIDS clinic at San Francisco General Hospital is almost empty. Just one patient remains, confused and emaciated, waiting for a ride home.Steven Deeks, who works here, stops to help the man he calls "Dallas" with one of the smaller indignities of this disease. The doctor calls again for a cab to come to an address the drivers may know too well and avoid too often.For three years, Dr. Deeks has kept a name and address book of 100 AIDS patients. Sixty have died and half the remaining 40 have moved on to late-stage disease.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN | October 19, 1997
Just as the inspection of the National Zoo in Niamey, Niger, was getting started, a baboon escaped.After a 20-minute chase, the animal lay unconscious, hit by a dart from a blowgun fired by Dr. Michael Cranfield, chief veterinarian at the Baltimore Zoo. Officials at the zoo in Niger's capital city were impressed with the blowgun's effectiveness. Their zoo has an animal collection that includes lions, baboons, chimpanzees and hyenas, but no blowguns. When an animal escaped, workers just chased it until it collapsed from exhaustion, or called police to come out and shoot it."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1992
PITTSBURGH -- In a renewed effort to help relieve the dire shortage of human donor organs, surgeons from the University of Pittsburgh yesterday took a liver from a baboon and implanted it in a human patient.The recipient was a man dying from hepatitis B, a virus that had destroyed his liver and made him ineligible to receive a donated human organ.The operation, which began shortly before noon, continued last night.The patient's name is not being released because of his desire for confidentiality.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | July 22, 1992
A 35-YEAR-OLD man dying of liver failure received a transplant on June 29.There is nothing especially newsworthy about that, since there are more than 2,000 liver transplants performed each year in the United States.What was remarkable was that the liver came from a baboon. This was the first attempt to use a liver from a baboon in a human recipient. So far, the transplant seems to be going well.While it is still too early to say that the experiment is a success, it is not too early to examine the morality of this experiment with a baboon liver.
NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | October 8, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- The University of California at San Francisco has given the green light to a controversial experiment in which a man will be injected with bone marrow from a baboon in the hope the animal's immune system will help him fight the AIDS virus.Clearance by medical committees evaluating the safety and ethics of the experiment means that preparations can begin for the procedure on volunteer Jeff Getty, a 38-year-old Oakland AIDS activist who has battled critics and the Food and Drug Administration to win approval for the test.
NEWS
July 31, 1992
In 1990, 2,200 Americans died while awaiting organ transplants. This year, 600 Americans will perish because of a shortage of transplantable hearts. And last year in Uruguay, in a case that underscored the poverty of the perpetrators as much as the dire need for human organs, 20 people were accused of illegally selling their own kidneys.Doctors and potential transplant recipients worldwide have decried the organ shortage. That's why the recent baboon-to-human liver transplant in Pittsburgh has drawn international attention.
NEWS
August 12, 1992
Rhetorical refugeWith the campaign heating up early this year, I'm certain the increasingly desperate Republicans are soon going to loudly and sanctimoniously stake their claim to being the party that truly represents "family values."Yet for all their impending bombastic rhetoric, have they actually ever defined what these values are to the average American voter?As someone reared in a traditional ethnic family, I'd like to help them in this defining: A cornerstone of family values is a deep, abiding concern for one's family members, one's neighbors and the trials and tribulations of one's community.
TRAVEL
January 24, 1999
Baboon hitches a ride; A Memorable TripBy Melanie Pefinis, Special to the SunVisions of wildlife and expansive sky rolled before me as I headed along the famed Garden Route on the South African coast.While on location, filming a documentary series throughout the region, my colleagues and I absorbed the rich landscape and natural surroundings. I was especially struck by the presence of monkeys in public -- almost as common as squirrels here in the States.As we drove, windows down, we spotted a group of baby baboons, the size of my hand, playing in the road ahead.
NEWS
By Steven I. Simmons | February 13, 1996
NEW YORK -- Two years ago, I was diagnosed with AIDS. Since then, I have often experienced the mind-numbing fear and desperation that leads some people to submit to bizarre medical experiments. The now-famous AIDS patient Jeff Getty, for example, allowed bone marrow from a baboon to be transplanted into his own weakened body. Convinced that this procedure represents his only chance for survival, and that it offers hope for the rest of us, Mr. Getty has staked his very life on a gamble he is sure to lose.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 26, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- It is after hours and the AIDS clinic at San Francisco General Hospital is almost empty. Just one patient remains, confused and emaciated, waiting for a ride home.Steven Deeks, who works here, stops to help the man he calls "Dallas" with one of the smaller indignities of this disease. The doctor calls again for a cab to come to an address the drivers may know too well and avoid too often.For three years, Dr. Deeks has kept a name and address book of 100 AIDS patients. Sixty have died and half the remaining 40 have moved on to late-stage disease.
NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | October 8, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- The University of California at San Francisco has given the green light to a controversial experiment in which a man will be injected with bone marrow from a baboon in the hope the animal's immune system will help him fight the AIDS virus.Clearance by medical committees evaluating the safety and ethics of the experiment means that preparations can begin for the procedure on volunteer Jeff Getty, a 38-year-old Oakland AIDS activist who has battled critics and the Food and Drug Administration to win approval for the test.
NEWS
By New York Times Service | January 11, 1993
A 62-year-old man became the world's second recipient of a baboon liver at the University of Pittsburgh yesterday in a transplant that was part of an effort to overcome the species barrier and alleviate the growing shortage of organs from human donors.The patient was dying from hepatitis B, a virus that destroyed his liver, building up bile in his blood and giving his skin a deep yellow hue.But his chronic active hepatitis B infection would most likely infect a donated human liver, making him ineligible to receive a donated human organ at most transplant centers, including the University of Pittsburgh, officials said.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 2, 1992
Miami -- So I was in my yard, cutting and dragging trees, which is pretty much what I do these days, and I stopped to listen to the battery-powered radio, and the announcer informed me that there were 300 baboons on the loose.And I thought to myself: Of course! Loose baboons! The one inconvenience we have not yet encountered this week!"The baboons are harmless," stated the announcer. "But don't get in their way."And I won't. If the baboons come to our house, they can just go on inside and help themselves to our rotting food and our water with bleach in it.We put bleach in the water because the radio announcer told us to. The theory is, the bleach makes the water taste so awful that nobody will drink it, thereby preventing the spread of disease.
NEWS
August 12, 1992
Rhetorical refugeWith the campaign heating up early this year, I'm certain the increasingly desperate Republicans are soon going to loudly and sanctimoniously stake their claim to being the party that truly represents "family values."Yet for all their impending bombastic rhetoric, have they actually ever defined what these values are to the average American voter?As someone reared in a traditional ethnic family, I'd like to help them in this defining: A cornerstone of family values is a deep, abiding concern for one's family members, one's neighbors and the trials and tribulations of one's community.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN | October 19, 1997
Just as the inspection of the National Zoo in Niamey, Niger, was getting started, a baboon escaped.After a 20-minute chase, the animal lay unconscious, hit by a dart from a blowgun fired by Dr. Michael Cranfield, chief veterinarian at the Baltimore Zoo. Officials at the zoo in Niger's capital city were impressed with the blowgun's effectiveness. Their zoo has an animal collection that includes lions, baboons, chimpanzees and hyenas, but no blowguns. When an animal escaped, workers just chased it until it collapsed from exhaustion, or called police to come out and shoot it."
NEWS
By New York Times Service | January 11, 1993
A 62-year-old man became the world's second recipient of a baboon liver at the University of Pittsburgh yesterday in a transplant that was part of an effort to overcome the species barrier and alleviate the growing shortage of organs from human donors.The patient was dying from hepatitis B, a virus that destroyed his liver, building up bile in his blood and giving his skin a deep yellow hue.But his chronic active hepatitis B infection would most likely infect a donated human liver, making him ineligible to receive a donated human organ at most transplant centers, including the University of Pittsburgh, officials said.
NEWS
July 31, 1992
In 1990, 2,200 Americans died while awaiting organ transplants. This year, 600 Americans will perish because of a shortage of transplantable hearts. And last year in Uruguay, in a case that underscored the poverty of the perpetrators as much as the dire need for human organs, 20 people were accused of illegally selling their own kidneys.Doctors and potential transplant recipients worldwide have decried the organ shortage. That's why the recent baboon-to-human liver transplant in Pittsburgh has drawn international attention.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | July 22, 1992
A 35-YEAR-OLD man dying of liver failure received a transplant on June 29.There is nothing especially newsworthy about that, since there are more than 2,000 liver transplants performed each year in the United States.What was remarkable was that the liver came from a baboon. This was the first attempt to use a liver from a baboon in a human recipient. So far, the transplant seems to be going well.While it is still too early to say that the experiment is a success, it is not too early to examine the morality of this experiment with a baboon liver.
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