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NEWS
March 6, 2014
Your recent article about Babe Ruth incorrectly implied that the Baltimore Orioles stopped in Fayetteville, N.C., en route to spring training in Florida ( "Babe Ruth's first in flight in Fayetteville," Feb. 27). In 1914, only a few baseball teams traveled as far south as Florida for spring training. Fayetteville, not Florida, was the Orioles' destination, and it was also the team's spring training headquarters during Babe Ruth's rookie professional season. The article also included a clipping with a photograph purported to be "the first picture ever made of Babe Ruth as a professional ball player.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
DETROIT -- The Orioles struck first in Game 3 of the American League Division Series -- and they did it in a familiar fashion. Designated hitter Nelson Cruz went deep in October. He has done that a bit. In the sixth inning, Cruz planted an 84-mph changeup from Tigers left-hander David Price just over the wall next to the foul pole in right field for a two-run homer to break a scoreless tie. A frustrated Tigers fan caught the ball and then placed it on the edge of the wall.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
They pass through the tiny row home at a steady clip, 50,000 pilgrims a year on a mission to visit their mecca. Here, in a second-floor bedroom of a narrow little residence on Emory Street, on a bitter cold day in 1895, George Herman Ruth was born. Humble digs, indeed, for one who'd grow up to be larger than life. But as Lorie Vaughan toured Babe Ruth's birthplace on Tuesday, she said the locale wasn't as important as the aura around it. "I've been to Monticello (Thomas Jefferson's home)
SPORTS
Mike Klingaman | August 2, 2014
A century ago in spring training, a rawboned Orioles rookie stepped to the plate, swung from the heels and hit a fastball deep to right field. The ball landed in a rut in a cornfield, more than 400 feet from home plate. In Fayetteville, N.C., a historic marker notes the spot where George Herman Ruth, 19, hit his first professional home run in his first outing as an Oriole in 1914. He wasn't yet The Babe - teammates would pin that nickname on him within the month - but he surely was Baltimore's own. That Ruth began his career with his hometown team surprises many, sports historian Mark Millikin said.
SPORTS
May 7, 1991
Despite fierce opposition, slugger captures stadium name 0) game with late rallyThe two favorites in the stadium debate dueled head-to-head this past week in "It's Your Call," and after a slow start out of the gate, Babe Ruth Stadium put on furious stretch drive to beat out Camden Yards.Two days into the poll, Camden Yards had 774 votes to Babe Ruth Stadium's 447. But over the weekend, the Babe Ruth Stadium forces rallied to finish with 1,728 votes to 1,226 for Camden Yards in the final "It's Your Call" balloting.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
DETROIT -- The Orioles struck first in Game 3 of the American League Division Series -- and they did it in a familiar fashion. Designated hitter Nelson Cruz went deep in October. He has done that a bit. In the sixth inning, Cruz planted an 84-mph changeup from Tigers left-hander David Price just over the wall next to the foul pole in right field for a two-run homer to break a scoreless tie. A frustrated Tigers fan caught the ball and then placed it on the edge of the wall.
NEWS
April 27, 1991
When the new Orioles stadium at Camden Yards is inaugurated next year, Babe Ruth's birthplace will be only a fly-ball away. A museum consisting of four row houses has operated at 212-218 Emory Street since 1974, commemorating the great slugger's roots in Baltimore and his career with the New York Yankees.As exhibits have increased and word has gotten around about the museum, the number of visitors has zoomed. Close to 35,000 fans paid homage to the Babe last year. That number is likely to triple at the very least when the Orioles move to the new downtown ballpark.
NEWS
February 5, 1995
It's difficult, seven decades later, to fully appreciate the hold Babe Ruth had on the American public. Not just baseball fans, let alone New York Yankees fans. Everyone. And not just because of his incredible prowess in the batter's box. His gargantuan personality -- a mixture of Falstaff and Pete Rose -- made him an idol whose every action was grist not only for the newspapers but also the topic of the day at office water coolers and rural soda fountains.And this in an era before media hype.
NEWS
February 3, 1995
This week, The Sun celebrates the 100th anniversary of Babe Ruth's birth on Feb. 6. Today, a 14-page commemorative section looks at the life and times of America's greatest sports legend, the Baltimore-born boy who became baseball's first prolific home run hitter.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | July 7, 1999
The Babe Ruth League Inc., a national youth baseball organization, is naming its largest division the Cal Ripken Baseball Division.Beginning next spring, the 471,000-player division for youth aged 5 to 12 will take the name of the Orioles third baseman and his recently deceased father, a former Orioles manager.The division is currently named "Bambino," a nickname of Babe Ruth.At a Camden Yards news conference yesterday, Ripken said he hopes Cal Ripken division players will be imbued with the "Ripken way" of baseball taught by his father.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 14, 2014
Phoenix Suns center Alex Len (Maryland) fractured a finger on his right hand and will miss the remainder of the team's summer-league games. Len suffered the injury Saturday night against the Golden State Warriors when his pinky got stuck in an opponent's jersey. This is the second straight year Len has missed time during the summer league because of injury; he sat out last year while recovering from ankle surgeries. Len made only 42 appearances for the Suns as a rookie, averaging 8.6 minutes per game.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 13, 2014
Memorabilia Ruth bat, contract sold at auction, but ball withdrawn A nearly century-old Babe Ruth bat sold for $214,000 at a memorabilia auction Saturday night, but the first baseball whacked over the Yankee Stadium fence by the legendary slugger failed to land a new home. The auction, held at the Sports Legends Museum a day after the 100-year anniversary of Ruth's first major league game, featured 200 items related to the Baltimore-born home run king. Ruth's bat was discovered in a stash of pre-World War I Red Sox bats found in a 150-year-old home outside Boston, according to Goldin Auctions of New Jersey, which handled the sale.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Your recent article about Babe Ruth incorrectly implied that the Baltimore Orioles stopped in Fayetteville, N.C., en route to spring training in Florida ( "Babe Ruth's first in flight in Fayetteville," Feb. 27). In 1914, only a few baseball teams traveled as far south as Florida for spring training. Fayetteville, not Florida, was the Orioles' destination, and it was also the team's spring training headquarters during Babe Ruth's rookie professional season. The article also included a clipping with a photograph purported to be "the first picture ever made of Babe Ruth as a professional ball player.
TRAVEL
By Roberta Sandler, For The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
On Saturday, March 7, 1914, George Herman Ruth planted his feet in the batter's box of the baseball diamond at the Cape Fear Fair Grounds in Fayetteville, N.C., and slammed a pitch. The confident rookie, who had just signed with the Baltimore Orioles, sent the ball soaring 350 feet, hitting his first home run as a professional baseball player. Fayetteville has never let go of that historic moment. Babe Ruth is still reverently referred to, his name inserted into local newspaper articles and spotlighted at a couple of local museums.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Orioles center fielder Adam Jones will receive this year's Babe Ruth Museum Community Service Award on Thursday during the annual Babe's Birthday Bash. Each year, the Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation gives the award to recognize "an active or former professional athlete or individual with ties to the Maryland sports community who has shown a strong devotion to giving back to the local community. " The Orioles' three-time All-Star and Gold Glove outfielder has a lengthy history of philanthropy in Baltimore, especially with local youth organizations.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | June 30, 2013
If you live in this town and love baseball, the Chris Davis story just keeps getting better and better. Thirty-one jacks, the most in franchise history this early in the season? The first player in baseball history - that spans a few years, as I recall - to have 30 homers and 25 doubles before July 1? This is starting to get surreal. But you wonder: has all this success gone to the guy's head? Has he changed in any way? "Besides from not really talking to anybody anymore and staying at different hotels [from the team]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 31, 1999
More than 200 guests crowded into the screening room of the ESPNZone at the Inner Harbor to celebrate the coming baseball season and to raise money for the Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum's planned expansion into historic Camden Station at Oriole Park."
NEWS
February 3, 1995
Whether handing out milk, dishing out ice cream or taking time out to visit a sick child, Babe Ruth had an affinity for children. His visits to hospitals and orphanges were innumberable. Often described as "just a big kid," Ruth felt so at ease with children perhaps because he was so like them in many ways.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Saint Agnes Hospital and the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation said Friday that they have raised $1.4 million to renovate the baseball field of the former Cardinal Gibbons School, preserving a site where Babe Ruth once played. The hospital, meanwhile, is firming up plans to add homes and offices around the field, on the campus of the Catholic school that closed in 2010. Saint Agnes plans to break ground on the baseball field within the next year, launching what officials have envisioned as Gibbons Commons, a mixed-use development on Caton Avenue, across the street from the hospital.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2012
July 7, 2001: Brady Anderson's bases-loaded triple gives the slumping Orioles a 4-3 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies before an announced 49,072, then the largest gathering to see a regular-season game at Camden Yards. "That's the first big base hit we've had in the last ... six days," manager Mike Hargrove says. The Birds will lose 14 of their next 16 games. July 6, 1983: Dick Edell becomes the seventh men's lacrosse coach in Terrapins history and declares: "It's great to be home.
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